News releases

Despite ongoing global pollution, researchers have discovered that levels of mercury in seabirds off the coast of B.C. have remained relatively stable over the past 50 years. Surprisingly, mercury in seabirds is now actually slightly lower. This might appear to be good news, but unfortunately it is due to a decline in fish stocks near the surface which has forced seabirds to change their diet, and in the process to feed in areas low in bacteria (known as sulfate-reducing bacteria) which act to control the levels of mercury in their bodies.

Classified as: environment, science, Kyle Elliott, Dept. of Natural Resource Sciences, food and sustainability, polution
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Published on: 16 Dec 2016

From laptops to cellphones, today’s technology advances through the ever-increasing speed at which electric charges are directed through circuits. Similarly, speeding up control over quantum states in atomic and nanoscale systems could lead to leaps for the emerging field of quantum technology.

Classified as: science and technology
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Published on: 15 Dec 2016

The total shoreline of the world’s lakes is more than four times longer than the global ocean coastline. And if all the water in those lakes were spread over the Earth’s landmass, it would form a layer some four feet (1.3 metres) deep.
 

Classified as: environment, ecology, Geography, global, Lehner, lakes, database, Messager, watersheds
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Published on: 15 Dec 2016

Lottery tickets may be fun-filled and exciting presents, but they are not suitable gifts for minors. Studies suggest that gambling is a popular yet risky activity among youth. Additionally, researchers have reported a correlation between age of gambling onset and problem gambling later in life. Lottery play is sometimes an initial introduction to gambling activities for minors.

Classified as: youth gambling, health and lifestyle, McGill University’s Youth Gambling Centre, Keith Whyte
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Published on: 8 Dec 2016

Assessing the risks that toxic chemicals pose to natural ecosystems is a huge challenge, given the thousands of chemicals that require testing. But the task is expected soon to become less daunting, thanks to a new tool being developed by McGill University researchers. 

Classified as: environment, Genome Québec, Natural Resource, Genome Canada, environmental risk, Basu, food and sustainability, kirsty duncan, chemicals, EcoToxChip
Published on: 8 Dec 2016

McGill University, in association with Lawrence and Frances Bloomberg and Manulife, is pleased to announce that Dr. Thomas Robinson, a Stanford University professor of Pediatric Medicine and pioneer in using novel motivational techniques to combat childhood obesity, is the winner of the 2016 Bloomberg Manulife Prize for the Promotion of Active Health.

Classified as: Desautels Faculty of Management, Bloomberg Manulife Prize, society and culture
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Published on: 7 Dec 2016

Rapid evolution of other species happens all around us all the time – and many of the most extreme examples are associated with human influences.

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Published on: 5 Dec 2016

Study tracks patients to better understand effects and possible treatments

December 1 is World AIDS Day, a time to raise awareness about a disease that has afflicted 70 million people worldwide, 35 million of whom have died as a result.

Classified as: HIV, AIDS, Lesley Fellows, SIDA, Cognitive neuroscience, VIH, Journée mondiale du sida
Published on: 1 Dec 2016

Just four weeks of prehabilitation (pre-surgery preparation) may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. That’s according to a recent study of close to 120 colorectal cancer patients in Montreal. This potentially means that, barring unforeseen circumstances that stem from the surgery itself, their recovery is likely to be speedier too, according to earlier research from the same McGill-led team.

Classified as: medicine, health, education, Cancer, Prehabilitation
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Published on: 1 Dec 2016

Researchers have linked a debilitating neurological disease in children to mutations in a gene that regulates neuronal development through control of protein movement within neuronal cells. 

Classified as: staff, science, neurological disease, genes, External, Student, Peter McPherson, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro)
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Published on: 28 Nov 2016

By Shawn Hayward, Montreal Neurological Institute

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University are playing key roles in uncovering the mechanisms underlying ALS and will share in $3.9 million, part of $4.5 million in research funding announced on Nov. 23 by the ALS Society of Canada in partnership with Brain Canada. 

Classified as: science, External, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro), ALS Society of Canada
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Published on: 24 Nov 2016

When two people smell the same thing, they can have remarkably different reactions, depending on their cultural background. Researchers at the Neuro have found that even when two cultures share the same language and many traditions, their reactions to the same smells can be different.

Classified as: staff, students, External, olfactory system, cognitive, Cognitive neuroscience
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Published on: 23 Nov 2016

A new athletic financial award -- known as the Jean Béliveau Award -- has been established at McGill University to recognize outstanding student-athletes and honour the memory of the legendary Montreal Canadiens captain and inspirational community leader.

Classified as: Athletics, Awards, award, jean béliveau, Jean Béliveau Award, marc gélinas
Published on: 23 Nov 2016

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) today awarded its 2016 Gold Medal to Prof. Claudia Mitchell of McGill’s Department of Integrated Studies in Education, in recognition of her work to strengthen HIV/AIDS education and prevention. 

Classified as: education, SSHRC, Suzanne Fortier, claudia mitchell, Gold Medal, HIV/AIDS
Published on: 22 Nov 2016

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