News releases

A multi-centre clinical study, led by Dr. Susan Kahn at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH), determined that nearly half of the patients who suffer a pulmonary embolism (PE) – a blood clot in the lung – experience long term limitations to their capacity for physical activity and that this had a negative impact on their quality of life. This research, published in Chest, is the first to demonstrate that PE may have a lasting effect on patients.

Classified as: faculty of medicine, Susan Kahn, Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, Pulmonary embolism
Category:
Published on: 20 Mar 2017

UPDATE: Thursday, 6:00 am

Back to business as usual today, after our very rare snow day. Students should consult with professors about rescheduled tests, exams, assignments and so on. Thanks to all staff who made it in yesterday. Now, let’s look forward to Spring!

 -------

 

UPDATE: Wednesday, 10:45 am

Category:
Published on: 15 Mar 2017

Global migration has stirred questions of human rights, democracy, of living together, of ‘us and them.’ The philosopher Charles Taylor and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants, and McGill law professor, François Crépeau, explore these and other questions at a time of rising populism and what may be called the fear of others.
Watch
Listen

 

 

Category:
Published on: 10 Mar 2017

Dr Morag Park, an associate member and research director for two of our PhD candidates in the department of Pathology, is the recipient of the Canadian Cancer Society 2017 Robert L. Noble Prize, as announced on March 8.

An acclaimed leader in Canadian cancer research, Dr. Park is widely recognized for her outstanding work in identifying key events in cancer development and the importance of tumour surroundings for cancer growth.  She has also demonstrated exceptional leadership in establishing national cancer research strategies as acknowledged by the Canadian Cancer Society.

Category:
Published on: 9 Mar 2017

Before they have the wing span to actually permit them to fly, young guillemots (also known as murres) leap hundreds of metres off towering cliffs and flutter down towards the sea, guided by their fathers. Scientists have long wondered why these tiny chicks make this remarkable leap, hoping to avoid the rocks below them, in what seems an unlikely survival strategy for a species.

Classified as: science, Department of Natural Resource Sciences, birds, Kylie Elliot, Survival, guillemot, murre
Published on: 9 Mar 2017

A foray into plant biology led one researcher to discover that a natural molecule can repair axons, the thread-like projections that carry electrical signals between cells. Axonal damage is the major culprit underlying disability in conditions such as spinal cord injury and stroke. 

Classified as: Biology, brain injury, neurosurgery, Neurology, axons, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI), Fusicoccin-A, Andrew Kaplan, Alyson Fournier, spinal injury
Category:
Published on: 8 Mar 2017

McGill University is the world’s third-best university for the study of Anatomy & Physiology, behind only the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, according to the 2017 QS World University Rankings by Subject. 

The seventh edition of QS Quacquarelli Symonds’s analysis of subject-specific university performance, released today, lists the world’s best universities for the study of 46 different subjects. Anatomy & Physiology is one of four new subject categories introduced in this year’s listing.

Classified as: QS, engineering, medicine, physiology, mining, subject rankings, anatomy, mineral
Category:
Published on: 7 Mar 2017

The Government of Canada announced today in Montreal that McGill University and two of its affiliated hospitals will receive $70.7 million through the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund, for upgrades to research facilities and energy-saving renovations. The Quebec government will provide an additional $5.1 million toward the cost of the work. 

Classified as: society and culture
Category:
Published on: 2 Mar 2017

At the University of New Brunswick this morning, The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced $51,968,051 for 223 projects at 39 universities across the country, including over $4.5 million across 14 projects at McGill, through the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund. The Fund was established to help universities like McGill innovate, as well as to attract and retain top research talent, by giving them access to cutting-edge research equipment, laboratories and tools.

Classified as: science and technology, Department of Chemistry
Published on: 28 Feb 2017

The risk of acute myocardial infarction for the elderly living in and around small cities is increased by air pollution caused by biomass burning from woodstoves.  

It is well documented that air pollution in big cities causes heart and lung problems. But what are its consequences on people in smaller urban centres?

Classified as: environment, pollution, health and lifestyle, Heart attacks, Scott Weichenthal, Wood burning stoves, biomass, British Columbia
Category:
Published on: 27 Feb 2017

A new mouse model with a working immune system could be used in laboratory research to improve understanding of Zika virus infection and aid development of new treatments, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens.

Classified as: faculty of medicine, virus, science and technology, zika, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, martin richer, selena sagan, plos pathogens
Published on: 23 Feb 2017

During an announcement at the University of Ottawa today, 94 research projects in universities across the country were awarded funding from the NSERC Strategic Partnership Grants program. Nine McGill projects are together receiving more than $4.1 million from the funding envelope to partner with a supporting organization on strategic research, including highly innovative research in green energy storage.

Category:
Published on: 16 Feb 2017

Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumour growth? Yes, according to a study conducted by Nicolas Cermakian, a professor in McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry.

Published in the journal BMC Biology, these results show for the first time that directly targeting the biological clock in a cancerous tumour has an impact on its development.

Classified as: science, Cancer, cancer cells, health and lifestyle, Nicolas Cermakian, McGill Department of Psychiatry, biological clock
Category:
Published on: 16 Feb 2017

Pages