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Can you judge a man by his fingers?

Maybe you should take a good look at your partner’s fingers before putting a ring on one. Men with short index fingers and long ring fingers are on average nicer towards women, and this unexpected phenomenon stems from the hormones these men have been exposed to in their mother’s womb, according to a new study by researchers at McGill University. The findings might help explain why these men tend to have more children.

Published on : 18 Feb 2015

New hope in the fight against pain

An international study led by scientists at McGill University reports, for the first time, that drugs that selectively target the melatonin MT2 receptor represent a novel class of analgesic drugs that could be used to treat patients with neuropathic pain.

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Published on : 17 Feb 2015

McGill researchers get $4.7M in NSERC project grants

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) announced 78 Strategic Project Grants today at the University of New Brunswick, including 10 for McGill University researchers totaling nearly $4.7 million. 

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Published on : 10 Feb 2015

Pick a card, any card

Magicians have astonished audiences for centuries by subtly, yet powerfully, influencing their decisions. But there has been little systematic study of the psychological factors that make magic tricks work.

Published on : 09 Feb 2015

Socioeconomic differences in adolescent health widen

Health inequalities in young people have grown alongside socioeconomic disparities between the rich and poor.

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Published on : 04 Feb 2015

Invasive Species in the Great Lakes by 2063

The Great Lakes have been invaded by more non-native species than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. In spite of increasing efforts to stem the tide of invasion threats, the lakes remain vulnerable, according to scientists from McGill University and colleagues in Canada and the United States. 

Published on : 29 Jan 2015

Blame it on your brain: salt and hypertension

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake “reprograms” the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body’s arterial blood pressure from rising.

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Published on : 22 Jan 2015

Current nutrition labeling is hard to digest

Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study by McGill University researchers published in the December issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Published on : 20 Jan 2015

Daily quiet time to improve new mothers’ health

A quiet time scheduled every afternoon could improve the health of newborns and mothers in maternity wards according to researchers at McGill University.

Published on : 19 Jan 2015

Is it possible to reset our biological clocks?

Imagine being able to easily get over all of the discomfort and problems of jet lag or night-shift work. Science is not quite there, but recent work by Marc Cuesta, Nicolas Cermakian and Diane B. Boivin from the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University has opened new therapeutic avenues for improving the synchronization of the body's different biological clocks.

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Published on : 16 Jan 2015

The secret of empathy

The ability to express empathy -- the capacity to share and feel another’s emotions -- is limited by the stress of being around strangers, according to a new study published today in the journal Current Biology.

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Published on : 15 Jan 2015

Isotopic memory of atmospheric persistence

Chemical analysis of some of the world’s oldest rocks, by an international team led by McGill University researchers, has provided the earliest record yet of Earth's atmosphere. The results show that the air 4 billion years ago was very similar to that more than a billion years later, when the atmosphere -- though it likely would have been lethal to oxygen-dependent humans -- supported a thriving microbial biosphere that ultimately gave rise to the diversity of life on Earth today.

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Published on : 14 Jan 2015