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Chairs in social pediatrics to be established

The Montreal Children’s Hospital Foundation, McGill University, the Université de Montréal and the Fondation du Dr Julien will establish two chairs in social pediatrics in the community, to be based in the Montreal neighbourhood of Hochelaga-Maisonneuve. In a Canadian first, researchers will conduct a long-term study on social pediatrics in the community.  This clinical practice has a proven track record, thanks to its founder, Dr. Gilles Julien, who has been practicing social pediatrics in disadvantaged neighbourhoods for nearly 30 years.

Published on : 26 Feb 2015

‘Blue-green algae’ proliferating in lakes

The organisms commonly known as blue-green algae have proliferated much more rapidly than other algae in lakes across North America and Europe over the past two centuries – and in many cases the rate of increase has sharply accelerated since the mid-20th century, according to an international team of researchers led by scientists at McGill University.

Published on : 26 Feb 2015

Current version of Bill 20 not supported

Classified as : External, medicine, Bill 20
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Published on : 25 Feb 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step

Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block – a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be used in applications such as optical and electronic devices or smart drug-delivery systems.

Published on : 23 Feb 2015

Epigenetic study tabs genes linked to allergies, asthma

Researchers from Canada, the UK, Sweden and the US have discovered more than 30 genes that strongly affect an antibody involved in allergies and asthma. Some of the genes could provide targets for drugs to treat those conditions, according to the international team’s study, published online in Nature on Feb. 18.

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Published on : 18 Feb 2015

Can you judge a man by his fingers?

Maybe you should take a good look at your partner’s fingers before putting a ring on one. Men with short index fingers and long ring fingers are on average nicer towards women, and this unexpected phenomenon stems from the hormones these men have been exposed to in their mother’s womb, according to a new study by researchers at McGill University. The findings might help explain why these men tend to have more children.

Published on : 18 Feb 2015

New hope in the fight against pain

An international study led by scientists at McGill University reports, for the first time, that drugs that selectively target the melatonin MT2 receptor represent a novel class of analgesic drugs that could be used to treat patients with neuropathic pain.

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Published on : 17 Feb 2015

McGill researchers get $4.7M in NSERC project grants

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) announced 78 Strategic Project Grants today at the University of New Brunswick, including 10 for McGill University researchers totaling nearly $4.7 million. 

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Published on : 10 Feb 2015

Pick a card, any card

Magicians have astonished audiences for centuries by subtly, yet powerfully, influencing their decisions. But there has been little systematic study of the psychological factors that make magic tricks work.

Published on : 09 Feb 2015

Socioeconomic differences in adolescent health widen

Health inequalities in young people have grown alongside socioeconomic disparities between the rich and poor.

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Published on : 04 Feb 2015

Invasive Species in the Great Lakes by 2063

The Great Lakes have been invaded by more non-native species than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. In spite of increasing efforts to stem the tide of invasion threats, the lakes remain vulnerable, according to scientists from McGill University and colleagues in Canada and the United States. 

Published on : 29 Jan 2015

Blame it on your brain: salt and hypertension

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake “reprograms” the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body’s arterial blood pressure from rising.

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Published on : 22 Jan 2015

Current nutrition labeling is hard to digest

Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study by McGill University researchers published in the December issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Published on : 20 Jan 2015

Daily quiet time to improve new mothers’ health

A quiet time scheduled every afternoon could improve the health of newborns and mothers in maternity wards according to researchers at McGill University.

Published on : 19 Jan 2015