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Gains made towards treatment of rare bone disease

Diagnosed in toddlers, X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the most common form of heritable rickets, in which soft bones bend and deform, and tooth abscesses develop because infections penetrate soft teeth that are not properly calcified.  Researchers at McGill University and the Federal University of Sao Paulo have identified that osteopontin, a major bone and tooth substrate protein, plays a role in XLH. Their discovery may pave the way to effectively treating this rare disease.  

Classified as : External
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Published on : 20 Feb 2013

Eye movements reveal impaired reading in schizophrenia

A study of eye movements in schizophrenia patients provides new evidence of impaired reading fluency in individuals with the mental illness.

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Published on : 18 Feb 2013

Chronic pain alters DNA marking in the brain

Injuries that result in chronic pain, such as limb injuries, and those unrelated to the brain are associated with epigenetic changes in the brain which persist months after the injury, according to researchers at McGill University. Epigenetics explores how the environment – including diet, exposure to contaminants and social conditions such as poverty – can have a long-term impact on the activity of our genes.

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Published on : 14 Feb 2013

Global governments’ failure to support family policies

A new report, launched today by the World Policy Analysis Centre, contains never-before-available comparative data on laws and public policies in 191 countries covering poverty, discrimination, education, health, child labour, child marriage and parental care. Changing Children’s Chances reveals how millions of children across the world face conditions that limit their opportunities to thrive and reach their full potential.

Classified as : External
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Published on : 13 Feb 2013

McGill, ÉTS announce collaborative aerospace projects

Close to one hundred and fifty professors, students and members of Montreal’s aerospace community were present last week, at the McGill Faculty Club, to celebrate the official announcement of six major collaborative projects in the aerospace field between McGill University and École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS).

Classified as : External
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Published on : 12 Feb 2013

Few women, visible minorities among top decision makers

While women have gained ground, accounting for 31.2% of senior leadership roles in Montreal, visible minorities remain more markedly underrepresented in these ranks. In spite of accounting for 22.5% of the population, only 5.9% of senior leaders were visible minorities according to a study led by researchers from McGill University’s Desautels Faculty of Management and Ryerson University’s Diversity Institute.  

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
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Published on : 08 Feb 2013

Making mobile robots work together

The danger that icebergs represent to both shipping and to the underwater cables that traverse the ocean floors is very real. It’s tricky for satellites to identify icebergs, and almost impossible to accurately predict the level of risk they present. Drifting clouds can make it difficult to see the movements of sea ice as well as the underwater shape of the icebergs that determines their movement and whether they are a threat. This is why ships moving off Newfoundland’s Grand Banks and the coast of Labrador are asked to report their position and ice observation to Ice St. John’s every six hours. 

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
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Published on : 08 Feb 2013

Heart valve disease linked to unusual cholesterol

The results of the study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, point to the first known cause of aortic stenosis and to a potential treatment to prevent this disease. “We found that an unusual type of cholesterol called Lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) – that is not normally screened for in current clinical practice – appears to be a cause of aortic valve disease,” says Dr. George Thanassoulis, one of the co-lead authors of the study, who is also director of preventive and genomic cardiology at the MUHC and an Assistant Professor in Medicine at McGill University. “High levels of this type of cholesterol are predicted primarily by an individual’s genetic make-up with only modest influence from lifestyle or other factors.” 

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
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Published on : 07 Feb 2013

Lifting Off and Flying High: Talent, Success in Canada

How does Canada foster and grow its celebrities and success? Is Canada efficient enough at spotting talent and supporting it through incubation and lift-off? The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) will examine what it means to have a career in Canada in three sectors: culture/entertainment, high-tech and sports/athletics at its annual conference, “Lifting Off and Flying High: Talent and Success in Canada”. The two-day event will be held at the Omni Mont-Royal Hotel, 1050 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, on February 11-12, 2013.

Classified as : External, MISC, Will Straw
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Published on : 31 Jan 2013

Media Advisory: Flood update

Please note that McGill University will be giving an update on the flooding experienced on the downtown campus since yesterday.

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Published on : 29 Jan 2013

Lupus drugs carry no significant cancer risk

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), commonly known as lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks healthy tissue such as the skin, joints, kidneys and the brain, leading to inflammation and lesions. The disease affects about 1 in 2000 Canadians, particularly women. Previous research has suggested that lupus patients have an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly lymphoma.  Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that occurs when cells called lymphocytes, which usually help protect the body from infection and disease, begin growing and multiplying uncontrollably leading to tumor growth.

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Published on : 25 Jan 2013

Facing life after death

One lies hidden inside a coffin. Another has his face exposed with hands extended at his sides. A third wears a mask over her face. They are three human Egyptian mummies that have been trapped in the manner they held when laid to rest nearly 2,000 years ago. And now we can reveal what they might have looked like.

Classified as : External
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Published on : 22 Jan 2013

Dietary shifts driving up phosphorus use

Dietary changes since the early 1960s have fueled a sharp increase in the amount of mined phosphorus used to produce the food consumed by the average person over the course of a year, according to a new study led by researchers at McGill University. Between 1961 and 2007, rising meat consumption and total calorie intake underpinned a 38% increase in the world’s per capita “phosphorus footprint,” the researchers conclude in a paper published online in Environmental Research Letters.

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Published on : 17 Jan 2013