In the Headlines

"Depending on how you remind the person, you might be able to erase different aspects of the memory," said Wayne Sossin of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University, whose lab collaborated with researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York.

Read more: CBC News

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Published on: 4 Jul 2017

The joint degree will be taught by comparing and contrasting indigenous peoples’ legal traditions with those of common law. The four-year program will include classroom and community-based components, and will follow the lead of McGill Law School’s transsystemic approach to common law and civil law legal education, by giving students the opportunity to tackle legal problems from multiple perspectives.

Read more: The Hill Times

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Published on: 28 Jun 2017

"Given their postmodern worldview, the millennial generation believes that organizations can grow and prosper through greater emotional openness. They also perceive negative emotions as having the ability to destroy a company. In her seminal work The Managed Heart, Arlie Hochschild studies the effects of emotional labor and the negative impacts of repressed emotions. Hochschild identifies emotional labor as the act of managing one’s own emotions in the workplace. High degrees of emotional labor can lead to burnout, employee dissatisfaction, and reduced productivity."

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Published on: 27 Jun 2017

According to Charles Boberg, an associate professor of linguistics at McGill University, there are two main differences in Canadian English pronunciation of vowels. "One of them is called 'Canadian rising,' and this is the stereotype that most Americans have of Canadian English and it involves the 'OU' vowel and the 'I' vowel. It's referring to raising the pronunciation of the vowel in the mouth," says Boberg, author of "The English Language in Canada." 

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Published on: 27 Jun 2017

The “Neuro”, as the institute is known, hopes its six-month-old open-science experiment will attract more private venture capital, create jobs and lure companies back to the city’s shrunken medical-research sector. The institute is in the midst of drawing up “measurable indicators” to track whether its groundbreaking approach to research and development is delivering on the promise, said Richard Gold, a professor of law and human genetics at McGill, who is leading the evaluation.

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Published on: 27 Jun 2017

While the LDT program stresses physical activity and a healthy lifestyle, Laurent Duvernay-Tardif said his mission is to promote balance. “It’s about a balance between school, physical activity, the arts,” he said. “Our goal is to help make better people.” It’s difficult to find a better role model than the Mont-St-Hilaire native who has combined playing football at the highest level with medical school. He was a standout at McGill even though his practice time was limited by his studies. 

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Published on: 21 Jun 2017

Graduation season is upon us, and with many bright young people taking their first steps into the workforce, it is important to acknowledge the challenges of what lie ahead. Learning and work styles of extroverts and introverts can be very different, so in order to succeed in the workplace, it is crucial to understand these differences and how to navigate them. As a newbie in the workforce, we have some advice from recent extroverted grads on how to start your career off on the right foot.

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Published on: 20 Jun 2017

"Especially in real time, the narrator has to keep going on the same storyline," said Nathalie Cooke, professor of literature at Montreal's McGill University. "So as Trump fuels the storyline with the populist Trump, the polarization in his readers actually fuels the continuation of the story."

Read more: NPR.org

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Published on: 19 Jun 2017

"International studies have shown that greater public contribution to dental care helps to level these sorts of socioeconomic inequalities. The federal government must work together with provincial partners, as well as doctors and dentists, to come up with a new minimum standard of acceptable public dental coverage. Until that happens, Canadians should probably turn their smugness toward the American system down a few notches."

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Published on: 16 Jun 2017

“The aim is not placement,” says Marie-José Beaudin, executive director of the Soutar Career Centre at McGill University’s Desautels Faculty of Management. Instead, the goal is to equip students with career-long skills in networking. “Your career can’t evolve in a silo,” she says. “You need to have champions who support that and mentors can be fantastic.”

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 15 Jun 2017

Tough on litigators who prattle on, famously reserved in person, McLachlin has a plain-speaking, often wry style in court. Yet those who know her speak of her easy laugh. McGill University law professor Daniel Jutras, who worked as her executive legal officer for three years, said McLachlin deals with stress by resorting to humour and was an impressive champion for the Canadian charter, Canadian judges and the independence of the judiciary abroad.

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Published on: 14 Jun 2017

"In a welcome development, 40 years after publishing the first Essential Medicines List (EML), WHO is poised to begin the development of an Essential Diagnostics List (EDL). An EDL should help amplify the impact of the EML. After all, patients need access to both diagnosis and treatment."

Op-ed by Dr. Madhukar Pai, Professor & Director of Global Health, McGill University

Read more: Huffington Post Canada
 

 

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Published on: 13 Jun 2017

Jamie Orchard speaks to Paul Martin after McGill University awarded the former prime minister an honorary doctorate recognizing his work after politics.

Find out more: Global News

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Published on: 13 Jun 2017

To Andrew Piper, a professor and director of the .txtLAB at McGill University in Montreal, that's another potential pitfall and danger of data visualizations like these: People read a lot into it. "Just picking the top [word] isn't a good way of representing what comes across as really important semantic implications," he said. "Are people googling 'pneumonia' because it's raining in BC? We have no idea."

Read more: Motherboard

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Published on: 9 Jun 2017

Still, Ecofiscal chairman Chris Ragan – an economist at McGill University – said future governments should raise the levy significantly after 2022, and could offset the impact of a higher carbon levy by lowering other taxes. “It would be a very bad outcome if the price peaked out at $50 in 2022 and everything else is done by complementary policies,” he said in an interview.

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Published on: 8 Jun 2017

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