Quick Links

In the Headlines news

Edmonton Journal - Sharing secrets of the beautiful game

Over the last century, soccer has evolved into an extremely high-intensity sport -- very few sports are played on such a large field, or last as long without regular rest periods. It's a fast-paced sport requiring both endurance and agility, as well as strength and speed. An elite player may expend 1,500 to 1,700 calories and run up to 12 kilometres a game. McGill University kinesiologist Dilson R

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 28 Jun 2010

The Mark - Canada's balanced capitalism

Desautels Faculty of Management professor Karl Moore, in video, on how Canada occupies the precious middle ground between "red meat capitalism" on the right and risky deficit spending on the left.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 28 Jun 2010

Panorama des universités

McGill : Considérée comme l'un des établissements les plus prestigieux du Canada, l'université anglophone McGill est aussi la plus ancienne du Québec. Mondialement réputée pour la qualité de l'enseignement et l'excellence de ses programmes, McGill se place au 18e rang des meilleures universités au monde, d'après le THE pour l'année 2009. L'Express http://www.lexpress.fr/emploi-carriere/panorama-

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 28 Jun 2010

L'Express - Des universités qui cliques

Impossible de s'endormir pendant les cours d'Ariel Fenster! Professeur de chimie à l'université McGill, à Montréal, ce Français d'origine n'est pas seulement un redoutable communicateur. Il sait aussi jouer des nouvelles technologies pour captiver son auditoire.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 28 Jun 2010

Globe and Mail: From magic trick to medical treatment

Before he was a neuroscientist, Amir Raz was a magician. He regularly performed stage shows to finance his university studies, but resisted introducing hypnosis to his act because he didn’t understand the science underlying the crowd-pleasing stunt... Dr. Raz, a researcher at McGill University, he is one of a small but growing number of brain scientists giving hypnosis serious attention.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 25 Jun 2010

BusinessWeek - Mouse Study Sheds Light on Diabetes-Heart Disease Link

A potential link between diabetes and a heightened risk of heart disease and sudden cardiac death has been spotted by researchers studying mice. In the new study, published in the June 24 issue of the journal Neuron, the investigators found that high blood sugar prevents critical communication between the brain and the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary activities in the body.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 24 Jun 2010

The Gazette - 24 Quebecers we love

Brenda Milner: At 91, the grande dame of cognitive neuroscience -she is a researcher at the Montreal Neurological Institute - is still reaping honours. In the past year: the 2010 lifetime achievement award by the Society of Experimental Psychologists for her work on memory; a runner-up for Canada's prestigious Herzberg science medal; and an honorary doctorate from UQAM.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 23 Jun 2010

CNN - Is your desk job bad for your health?

The hazards of sitting all day long--whether you're staring at a computer screen at work or watching TV on the couch at home--are better understood now than ever. In recent years, researchers have linked too much sitting to back pain, repetitive stress injuries, obesity, and even an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease… Good posture is also important for avoiding stress and strain at work,

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 22 Jun 2010

CBC - Sask. dinosaur industry lags, experts say

McGill paleontologist Hans Larsson says Saskatchewan has rich dinosaur fossil deposits, comparable to Alberta's.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 21 Jun 2010

The Gazette - What's Next for the Montreal Neuro?

A healing garden, a cafeteria as good as the city's best museum bistro, perhaps a lounge with interactive games that both distract and engage the minds of patients and their loved ones.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 19 Jun 2010

The Gazette - He's chasing a Holy Grail... at 16

Science whiz's dream: a Nobel; Marymount student has a mess of medals, but makes time for other stuff, too... Though he just finished Grade 10, Abicumaran Uthamacumaran's already talking about continuing his research to the Ph. D. level. His life's goal is a Nobel Prize in medicine.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 18 Jun 2010

McGill research magazine "Headway" named Magazine of the Year in education awards

The Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education presented their annual Prix d'excellence awards last week, and several of the winners were magazines and magazine people. Headway, McGill's research magazine, took the top prize for Best Magazine. Edited by James Martin and designed by Carmen Jensen, it was praised by the CCAE judges as "adventurous" and "inventive."

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 17 Jun 2010

Globe and Mail: Virtual rehab

In recent years, researchers around the world have been investigating the potential of virtual reality to help victims of stroke and other brain injuries. While it can't replace work with a physical therapist, it is still effective and far cheaper. But most importantly, because it's entertaining, patients are more likely to do the same exercises over and over again, which is crucial for recovery.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 14 Jun 2010

The Gazette: Miracle berry turns a pucker into sweetness

(Chemistry professor Joe Schwarcz's column in Sunday's Gazette): "I needed a couple of human guinea pigs. So I volunteered my teenage daughter Rachel and her friend Eden. (They said I could use their names because they want to be famous.) Their task was a simple one. They were to dissolve a little tablet on their tongue and then suck on a lemon wedge…"

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 13 Jun 2010

The Gazette: Genes linked to Vitamin D deficiency

In the era before vitamins and cod-liver oil, children suffering from rickets got the "sunshine cure" to rid them of the deforming condition caused by soft, weak bones... Now, an international study co-authored by McGill University researcher Brent Richards explains why sunshine and certain foods aren't always enough to ward off a Vitamin D deficiency.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Category :
Published on : 12 Jun 2010