In the Headlines

Newsweek | “Usually when we see a short gamma-ray burst, the jet emission generated gets bright for a short time as it smashes into the surrounding medium—then fades as the system stops injecting energy into the outflow,” said McGill University astrophysicist Daryl Haggard in a statement. “This one is different; it’s definitely not a simple, plain-Jane narrow jet.”

 

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Published on: 19 Jan 2018

"No one gains by coming up with inaccurate and exaggerated estimates," says lead author Dr. Brett Thombs, a professor in the department of psychiatry at McGill University. "What we do need to understand is what the burden is out there, how many people [have depression], and then we need to really advocate strongly to make sure those people get better care."

The Globe and Mail
 

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Published on: 19 Jan 2018

"We found something that is clearly in an extreme place and the extreme location may create a phenomenon that is one of the biggest astrophysical mysteries of recent times," offered study co-author Victoria Kaspi, a professor at McGill University and leading voice on pulsars and neutron stars, in a statement. 

Vice (Motherboard)

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Published on: 19 Jan 2018

Some medical students at McGill University in Montreal are getting a firsthand look at what working in an Indigenous community is like. It’s through a new program that includes a grassroots approach to healthcare.

APTN

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Published on: 19 Jan 2018

The study, published in Child Development, has found new reasons to believe that Autistic children who are bilingual have increased cognitive flexibility compared to children that are monolingual. According to Professor Aparna Nadig, the senior author of the paper, from McGill University, this research has been a long time coming…

The Independent 
 

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Published on: 19 Jan 2018

McGill University meteorology professor John Gyakum, along with the revered late Massachusetts Institute of Technology meteorologist Fred Sanders, first coined the term in a paper they published in 1980. They used the phrase to describe powerful cyclones that get their energy from rapid drops in pressure caused by hot and cold temperatures colliding.

"If the term itself — ‘bomb’ — helps to spur more constructive research, then I’m happy."―John Gyakum

Classified as: Faculty of Science, department of atmospheric and oceanic sciences, John Gyakum
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Published on: 4 Jan 2018

Excerpt from Merve Emre's new book, Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America. She is an assistant professor of English at McGill.

Classified as: merve emre, New Yorker, Paraliterary
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Published on: 4 Jan 2018

That could mean the jets of high-speed radiation sent out by the explosion were not aimed directly at Earth, and were instead slightly off axis, says Daryl Haggard of McGill University, whose team used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to spy on the merger.

Read more: National Geographic

 

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Published on: 21 Dec 2017

Minister of Finance Bill Morneau, Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan and McGill University’s Martha Crago attend a prebudget discussion with scientists and researchers at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto on Dec. 15, 2017.

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 19 Dec 2017

As a consequence, researchers such as Abhishek Gupta are trying to help Montreal lead the world in ensuring AI is developed responsibly. "The spotlight of the world is on (Montreal)," said Gupta, an AI ethics researcher at McGill University who is also a software developer in cybersecurity at Ericsson. His bi-monthly "AI ethics meet-up" brings together people from around the city who want to influence the way researchers are thinking about machine-learning.

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Published on: 18 Dec 2017

"To some extent, it is beyond the control of world leaders, and has more to do with the cycle of protest," says Rex Brynen, a political science professor at McGill University whose work focuses on the conflict. "Most Western leaders will be trying to calm things. The Palestine Authority, although deeply dismayed by the U.S. decision, has no interest in protests getting out of hand. Nor does Jordan. However, some in the region—President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey, for example, or Hamas, or Hizbullah—will be trying to build on popular anger, however."

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Published on: 14 Dec 2017

Ask Montreal pain specialist Yoram Shir about the deadly opioid crisis ravaging North America, and he immediately calls for perspective on the rivers of narcotic pills running into so many homes. Nothing here is black or white, says Shir, director of the McGill University Health Centre’s Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit, starting with the ubiquitous nature of pain. One in four people suffers from chronic pain — a condition that is arduously resistant to therapy. But the best painkiller in the medicine cabinet risks turning the patient into a drug-abusing addict.

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Published on: 13 Dec 2017

Article by Daniel Plourde, Bioresource Engineering undergraduate at McGill University.

With the ski season rapidly approaching, many resorts across Canada are beginning to prepare to make artificial snow, a process that has become an annual tradition. Although snow-making has been used extensively since the early 1970s, we now see it used more and more because of climate change and declining annual snow cover across the nation.  In fact, according to Statistics Canada, the mean annual snow cover in Canada declined by 5.1 per cent from 1972 to 2010.

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Published on: 12 Dec 2017

Mr. Morneau has faced criticism this fall from business groups over proposed small-business tax changes set to take effect Jan. 1, and the government s appetite for undertaking further tax changes is unclear. Council member Christopher Ragan, a McGill University economics professor, said the group didn't discuss political challenges the Liberals may face in following its advice. "We don t care about the politics," he said. "Is this minister going to take it on? We'll have to wait and see. … I think he would because it s a good thing to do."

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Published on: 11 Dec 2017

In the past two decades, some two dozen new city projects were announced in the Middle East. About half remain “power point cities” existing only on websites, said Sarah Moser, an urban geography professor at McGill University in Montreal. Others are well behind schedule.

Read more: The Washington Post


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Published on: 8 Dec 2017

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