Desautels research

Authors: P.P. Silveira, I. Pokhvisneva, H. Gaudreau, L. Atkinson, A.S. Fleming, M.B. Sokolowski, M. Steiner, J.L. Kennedy, Laurette Dubé, R.D. Levitan, M.J. Meaney, MAVAN research team

Publication: Appetite, Vol. 120, January 2018

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Classified as: Laurette Dube, Marketing
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Published on: 20 Nov 2017

Professor Desmond Tsang's paper "Quality of Life and Earnings Management: Do Firms at Less Desirable Locations Manipulate Earnings More Aggressively?" with co-author Jing Zhang was awarded the 2017 ARES Manuscript Prize in the category of Innovative Thinking "Thinking Out of the Box" presented at the ARES Annual Conference.

Classified as: Desmond Tsang, Accounting
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Published on: 17 Nov 2017

Authors: Georgios Darivianakis, Angelos Georghiou, Roy S. Smith, John Lygeros 

PublicationIEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology (Volume: PP, Issue: 99)

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Classified as: Angelos Georghiou, operations management
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Published on: 10 Nov 2017

Authors: Linda M.Ippolito and Nancy J. Adler

Publication: Journal of Business Research, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Nancy Adler, Organizational Behaviour
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Published on: 6 Nov 2017

Authors: Nancy J. Adler and Andre L. Delbecq

Publication: Journal of Management Inquiry, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Nancy Adler, Organizational Behaviour
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Published on: 6 Nov 2017

Book: The Internet Trap: Five Costs of Living Online

Author: Ashesh Mukherjee

Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Rotman -UTP Publishing, Forthcoming in March 2018

Classified as: Ashesh Mukherjee, Marketing
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Published on: 1 Nov 2017

Professor Emmanuelle Vaast's paper published in Information Systems Research, "Folding and Unfolding: Balancing Openness and Transparency in Open Source Communities," with Maha Shaikh has been awarded the runner-up for the best paper award for papers published in 2016 at ISR.

Classified as: Emmanuelle Vaast, Information Systems, Information Systems Research
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Published on: 27 Oct 2017

Desautels prides itself on being a research-intensive management faculty that brings together scholars with a broad range of expertise, including mathematics, economics, psychology, sociology, and technology. Together, they address in their work issues of great importance to not only the business community, but also to society.

Classified as: Vihang Errunza
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Published on: 27 Oct 2017

Authors: Ayse Cilaci Tombus¸ Necati Aras, Vedat Verter

Publication: Journal of Remanufacturing, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Vedat Verter, operations management
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Published on: 23 Oct 2017

Authors: Laurent Mirabeau, Steve Maguire and Cynthia Hardy

Publication: Strategic Management Journal, Forthcoming

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At the intersection of Strategy Process (SP) and Strategy-as-Practice (SAP) research lies the focal phenomenon they share – strategy, which manifests itself in a variety of ways: intended, realized, deliberate, emergent, unrealized, and ephemeral strategy.

We present a methodology comprised of three stages that, when integrated in the manner we suggest, permit a rich operationalization and tracking of strategy content for all manifestations. We illustrate the utility of our methodology for bridging SP and SAP research by theorizing practices that are more likely to give rise to unrealized and ephemeral strategy, identifying their likely consequences, and presenting a research agenda for studying these transient manifestations.

Classified as: Steve Maguire, Strategy & Organization, Strategic Management Journal, Desautels 22
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Published on: 23 Oct 2017

Authors: Juan Serpa and Harish S. Krishnan

Publication: Management Science, Vol. 63, No. 2, February 2017

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The use of business insurance has been traditionally studied in a single-firm setting, but in reality preventing operational accidents involves the (unobservable) efforts of multiple firms. We show that, in a multifirm setting, insurance can be used strategically as a commitment mechanism to prevent excessive free riding by other firms. In the presence of wealth imbalances, contracts alone leave wealth-constrained firms with inefficiently low incentives to exert effort (because of limited liability) and firms with sufficient wealth with excessive incentives. Insurance allows the latter to credibly commit to lower effort, thereby mitigating the incentives of the wealth-constrained firms to free ride. This finding shows that insurance can improve the efficiency of risk management efforts by decreasing free-riding problems.

Read full article: Management Science

Classified as: Juan Serpa, operations management, management science, Desautels 22
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Published on: 19 Oct 2017

Authors: Juan Serpa and Harish S. Krishnan

Publication: Management Science, Forthcoming

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Firms in a vertical relationship are likely to affect each other’s productivity. Exactly how does productivity spill over across this type of relationship (i.e., through which mechanisms)? Additionally, how does the relative importance of these mechanisms depend on the structure of the supply chain?

To answer these questions, we decompose the channels of upstream productivity spillovers—from customers to suppliers—by developing a structural econometric model on a sample of approximately 22,500 supply chain dyads.

We find that the “endogenous channel” (i.e., the effect of the customer’s own productivity on the supplier’s productivity) is by far the most important source of spillovers. This is especially true if (i) the supplier has a concentrated customer base, (ii) the supplier and the customer have similar operational characteristics, and (iii) the relationship has medium maturity.

In the converse scenarios, we find, it is more important to have a partner with a portfolio of favorable “contextual” characteristics (high inventory turnover, financial liquidity, and asset turnover) than to have a productive partner.

Read full article: Management Science

Classified as: Juan Serpa, operations management, management science, Desautels 22
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Published on: 19 Oct 2017

Authors: Jason R. Blevins, Ahmed Khwaja and Nathan Yang

Publication: Management Science, Forthcoming

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We develop and estimate a dynamic game of strategic firm expansion and contraction decisions to study the role of firm size on future profitability and market dominance. Modeling firm size is important because retail chain dynamics are more richly driven by expansion and contraction than de novo entry or permanent exit. Additionally, anticipated size spillovers may influence the strategies of forward looking firms making it difficult to analyze the effects of size without explicitly accounting for these in the expectations and, hence, decisions of firms. Expansion may also be profitable for some firms while detrimental for others.

Thus, we explicitly model and allow for heterogeneity in the dynamic link between firm size and profits as well as potential for persistent brand effects through a firm-specific unobservable. As a methodological contribution, we surmount the hurdle of estimating the model by extending the Bajari, Benkard and Levin (2007) two-step procedure that circumvents solving the game. The first stage combines semi-parametric conditional choice probability estimation with a particle filter to integrate out the serially correlated unobservables.

The second stage uses a forward simulation approach to estimate the payoff parameters. Data on Canadian hamburger chains from their inception in 1970 to 2005 provides evidence of firm-specific heterogeneity in brand effects, size spillovers and persistence in profitability. This heterogeneous dynamic linkage shows how McDonald’s becomes dominant and other chains falter as they evolve, thus affecting market structure and industry concentration.

Read full article:  Management Science

Classified as: nathan yang, Marketing, management science, Desautels 22
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Published on: 19 Oct 2017

Authors: David Chambers, Sergei Sarkissian and Michael J. Schill

Publication: Review of Financial Studies, Forthcoming

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We study market segmentation effects using data on U.S. railroads that list their bonds in New York and London between 1873 and 1913. This sample provides a unique setting for such analysis because of the precision offered by bond yields in cost of capital estimation, the geography-specific nature of railroad assets, and ongoing substantial technological change. We document a significant reduction in market segmentation over time. Whilst New York bond yields exceeded those in London in the 1870s, this premium disappeared by the early 1900s. However, the segmentation premium persisted in the more remote regions of the United States.

Read full article: Review of Financial Studies

Classified as: Sergei Sarkissian, finance, Review of Financial Studies, Desautels 22
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Published on: 18 Oct 2017

Authors: Matthieu Bouvard and Raphaël Levy

Publication: Management Science, Forthcoming

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In a market where sellers solicit certification to overcome asymmetric information, we show that the profit of a monopolistic certifier can be hump-shaped in its reputation for accuracy: a higher accuracy attracts high-quality sellers but sometimes repels low-quality sellers. As a consequence, reputational concerns may induce the certifier to reduce information quality, thus depressing welfare. The entry of a second certifier impacts reputational incentives: when sellers only solicit one certifier, competition plays a disciplining role and the region where reputation is bad shrinks. Conversely, this region may expand when sellers hold multiple certifications.

Read full article: Management Science

Classified as: Matthieu Bouvard, finance, management science, Desautels 22
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Published on: 18 Oct 2017

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