National Indigenous History Month Event Series

Event

Online
Price: 
Free

National Indigenous History Month

National Indigenous History Month

Event Series

Wachiya, Kwe, Tansi, Ullukkut, Hawa’a, Bonjour, Hello.

In the spirit of reconciliation, it is our pleasure to announce and welcome you to this year’s School of Continuing Studies National Indigenous History Month event series. This year our series will include talks and presentations from remarkable Indigenous speakers, educators, scholars, and professionals from across the country, who will share with us the history, culture, and stories of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada. I encourage you to join us and take this opportunity to learn more about First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples. It is through learning and understanding that we can create change, envision new opportunities, and experience personal growth.

Niá:wen, Meegwetch, Nakurmik, Merci, Thank you!

George R. Kennedy, Faculty Lecturer, McGill School of Continuing Studies

 

Upcoming Events


Ka'nón'sen - Reviving and Revitalizing the Dormant Practice and Language of Tattooing Traditions

Presented by Kanen'tó:kon Hemlock, Kahnawà:ke Bear clan

Date: Wednesday, June  15, 2022
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EDT

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Event Description

Kanen'tó:kon Hemlock is a member of the traditional Bear clan from the Mohawk Nation at Kahnawà:ke, a small community located outside Montreal. From a young age, Kanen'tó:kon was fascinated by his culture and began to practice the art of tattooing according to the ancient protocols to revitalize the lost tradition. During this event, he invites us to witness the first tattooing in a longhouse in roughly 300 years.

This event will be held in English.

About Kanen'tó:kon Hemlock, Kahnawà:ke Bear clan
Kanen'tó:kon Hemlock of the Mohawk nation has been helping revive tattooing traditions that have not been practiced for several hundred years. Using cultural and traditional protocols from the past, as well as modern sanitation practices, he is the first in his tradition. The practice is a cultural endeavor and not a business activity.

1760 Written Treaties with the Fires of the 7 Nations and the Crown are “Still Intact”

Presented by Konrad Sioui, Former Chief of the Huron - Wendat Nation

Date: Tuesday, June 21, 2022
Time: 10:30 a.m.  to 12:00 p.m. EDT

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Event Description

In 1982, Georges, Hugues, Régent, and Konrad Sioui were charged and convicted of illegally camping, starting fires, and cutting down trees in Jacques-Cartier Park in Québec. They appealed their case to the Supreme Court of Canada. In R. v. Sioui, also known as the Sioui Decision, the Siouis won a unanimous decision at the Supreme Court of Canada in 1990. The ruling acknowledged that a document known as “the Huron-British Treaty of 1760” signed between British General James Murray and the Huron-Wendat chief was still valid as it was an international agreement entered into between sovereign nations and it protected their right to use the land for ceremonial purposes. During this webinar, former Chief Konrad Sioui discusses the role this formative case played in his life and career and how it changed the way Indigenous treaties are interpreted in Canadian courts of law since then.

This event will be held in French but participants may ask questions in French or English.

About Konrad Sioui, Former Chief of the Huron - Wendat Nation

Konrad Sioui is a hereditary chief of the Bear Clan of the Huron-Wendat Nation, Grand Chief of the Council of his Nation, and has been elected three consecutive times as Regional Chief of the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador. During that time, he represented the region on the Executive Council and acted on numerous occasions as Grand Chief under the leadership of George Erasmus. He was also the official and national spokesperson on constitutional reform issues between 1984 and 1994.

In 1991, we won a landmark, unanimous decision at the Supreme Court of Canada against Quebec and Canada known as the Sioui Decision. This ruling acknowledged that treaties entered into between the Crown and First Nations are international agreements entered into by sovereign nations.

Sioui is a dedicated humanitarian and diplomat and is a respected and skilled negotiator. He pursues a simple and traditional lifestyle with his wife, Linda Rock of the Innu Nation, and his four children on the Huron Reserve at Wendake, Quebec.


Indigegogy in the Classroom

Presented by Dr. Kathy Absolon

Date: Wednesday, June 29, 2022
Time: 10:30 a.m.  to 12:00 p.m.

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Event Description

In this presentation, Dr. Kathy Absolon will discuss the second edition of her newly released book, "Kaandossiwin How We Come to Know: Indigenous Re-Search Methodologies." She will provide a brief history of research of Indigenous Peoples and share her development of “Indigenous re-search,” which is steeped in Indigenous ways of learning through an Indigenous lens. She will also speak about her research on colonial trauma and how embedded within Indigenous knowledge systems are methodologies that can guide knowledge production, aka: re-search.

This event will be held in English.

About Dr. Kathy Absolon

Kathy Absolon (Minogiizhigokwe – Shining Day Woman) is Anishinaabe kwe who is a community helper, knowledge carrier, seeker, educator, re-searcher, and writer. Kathy is a member of Flying Post First Nation Treaty 9. At the age of 60, Kathy carries truth stories about both a rich cultural history and Canada’s colonial history. Her lifetime of work in decolonial stories and Indigenous education has been informed by her land-based philosophy.

Currently, Kathy is a Professor in the Indigenous Field of Study, Masters of Social Work Program in the Faculty of Social Work and the Director of the Centre for Indigegogy at Wilfrid Laurier University. She spent the first 20 years of her life in the bush in Cranberry Lake. The land, she says, taught her so much about life and she continues to reflect and draw on her land-based teachings.

Her passion for wellness among her peoples and the restoration of Indigenous knowledge in Creation has been one of the driving forces in her life work as an Indigenous wholistic practitioner in child welfare, Native mental health, youth justice, and community work. Her academic and cultural work has been in restoring, reclaiming, and re-righting Indigenous history, knowledge, and cultural worldviews, and making the invisible visible. She promotes this through Indigenous research methodologies and published “Kaandossiwin, How We Come to know” (2011). She has authored other works in wholistic practice, social inclusion, reconciliation, community healing and wellness, and Indigenous knowledge.


Past Events


The Apology 24 Years After

Presented by Beverley Jacobs, CM, LLB, LLM, PhD Bear Clan, Mohawk Nation

Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2022
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. EDT

Watch the Replay

 

Event Description

On June 11, 2008, then Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologized for the harms caused by establishing the residential school system. He said, The Government of Canada sincerely apologizes and asks the forgiveness of the Aboriginal peoples of this country for failing them so profoundly. We are sorry. Dr. Beverley Jacobs is an intergenerational survivor and was President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada at the time and had the opportunity to respond on the floor of the House of Commons in front of millions of people. During this webinar, she will share her experience and her thoughts post-apology.

This event will be held in English.

About Beverley Jacobs, CM, LLB, LLM, PhD Bear Clan, Mohawk Nation

Recently appointed as Senior Advisor to the President on Indigenous Relations and Outreach at the University of Windsor, Dr. Beverley Jacobs is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Windsor and practices law part-time in her home community of Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. Her research focuses on Indigenous Legal Orders, Indigenous Wholistic Health, Indigenous Research Methodologies, and Decolonization of Eurocentric Law.

Beverley obtained a Bachelor of Law Degree from the University of Windsor in 1994, a Master of Law Degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2000, and a Ph.D. from the University of Calgary in 2018.

Dr. Jacobs is a former President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (elected 2004 to 2009) and also a consultant/researcher/writer/public speaker. Her work centres around ending gendered colonial violence against Indigenous people and restoring Indigenous laws, beliefs, values, and traditions.

A prolific scholar, her published work has earned her numerous awards; her research combined with her advocacy has translated into national and international recognition. Dr. Jacobs received the Laura Legge Award from the Law Society of Ontario in 2021 and she was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2018. She received two awards from Mohawk College in 2018: Alumni of Distinction Award and Distinguished Fellow – Adjunct Professor. In her first year of teaching at the Faculty of Law at the University of Windsor in 2017, she received an Office of Human Rights, Equity & Accessibility, Human Rights and Social Justice Award. In 2016, she received a Franco-German Prize for Human Rights and the Rule of Law from the Governments of France and Germany for her human rights fight for the issues relating to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. In 2008, she also received a Governor General’s Award in Commemoration of the Person’s Case, an Esquao Award from the Institute for the Advancement of Aboriginal Women and a Canadian Voice of Women of Peace Award from the Canadian Department of Peace Initiative and Civilian Peace Service Canada.


The Anthropocene and Learning to Be Guests

Presented by Yann Allard-Tremblay, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, McGill University

Date: Friday, June 3, 2022
Time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EDT

 

Event Description

The world faces catastrophic climate change and ecological ruin. Often, solutions are sought that reassert the modern logic of technological mastery over nature. In contrast, Indigenous ways of life ground our responsibilities in concrete relationships with humans and all other living things. By learning from Indigenous peoples, we can discover how to be guests of the land and we can envision a path away from the Anthropocene.

The proceeds from the lecture ($10 fee/person) will be directed to the SCS Indigenous Students Bursary fund.

About Yann Allard-Tremblay, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, McGill University

Dr. Allard-Tremblay, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, McGill University, holds a PhD in philosophy from St Andrews University. He is a member of the Huron-Wendat First Nation. He is interested in the ways in which the political thought of Indigenous peoples offers alternative ways to think about, and transform, political concepts.


Silverwork of the Haudenosaunee

Teyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant and Yonenyà:kenht Jesse Brant, Mohawk Turtle Clan Sisters and Founders of Sapling & Flint

Date: Wednesday, June 8, 2022
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:00  p.m. EDT

Watch the Replay

Event Description

With the introduction of trade silver by European traders', the legacy of the formation of the United States of America and Canada was solidified by the commitment of the Haudensoaunee, in their allyship to the new visitors. Jesse and Dakota Brant will be speaking on how Silversmithing has a 400-year tradition amongst the Haudenosaunee.

This event will be held in English.

About Teyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant and Yonenyà:kenht Jesse Brant, Mohawk Turtle Clan Sisters and Founders of Sapling & Flint

Jesse and Dakota Brant are Mohawk nation sisters from Ohswé:ken and are the co-founders of Sapling & Flint, a retail and wholesale jewellery manufacturer specializing in gold and sterling silver that has sold across Canada, the USA, western Europe, Japan and Korea. Silversmithing has a 400 year tradition in Haudenosaunee communities beginning with the introduction of trade silver by european traders wanting the Haudenosaunee connection into North American markets. Trade, and jewelry's place within trade is part of the story of Canada and Sapling & Flint is creating "Conversation pieces that share the story of Turtle Island" while revitalizing arts-based jobs in the jewellery industry for the Ohswé:ken community.

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