Feindel Virtual Brain and Mind Lecture Series: Causal role of brain oscillations, large-scale synchronization, and cross-frequency interactions in working memory

Event

Dr. Philippe Albouy presents, "Causal role of brain oscillations, large-scale synchronization, and cross-frequency interactions in working memory". 

Registration available here

Speaker: Philippe Albouy, Ph.D.

CERVO Brain Research Centre, School of Psychology, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada

International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS); Centre for Research in Brain, Language and Music; Montreal, QC, Canada

Abstract: Several prior studies using MEG, EEG and iEEG have shown that local brain oscillations as well as large-scale connectivity in multiple frequencies are enhanced in working memory (WM) in humans. Yet the specific functional and causal roles of these oscillations in the representation of different kinds of sensory information in memory are poorly understood. I will discuss our recent studies using source-reconstructed MEG / EEG as well as iEEG data in WM that aim to define the specific fingerprints of large-scale networks underlying the maintenance of feature-specific information and contents of auditory WM.

Second, I will discuss the causal relationship between fronto-parietal theta oscillations and working memory performance by presenting studies combining information-based neuromodulation (rhTMS/visual rhythmic stimulation/MEG/EEG) and longitudinal WM training. I will show how such optimized non-invasive brain stimulation procedure (targeting functional relevant oscillatory metrics) can enhance brain plasticity and improve behaviour. In summary, I will speak about how different oscillations and their within-frequency and cross-frequency interactions coordinate memory formation.

Bio: Dr. Philippe Albouy is assistant professor in cognitive neuroscience at the psychology department of Laval University, a regular researcher at CERVO Brain Research Centre (Quebec city), at the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), at the Centre for Research in Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM) and a FRQ-S Junior 1 Scholar. He received his PhD in Neuroscience in 2013 from Lyon 1 University (France, with Dr Barbara Tillmann and Dr Anne Caclin) where he used multimodal neuroimaging approaches (MEG, fMRI, EEG, iEEG) to study the brain dynamics related to auditory perception and working memory in humans. In 2014, he joined the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University, first as a FYSSEN, then as a Banting postdoctoral Fellow in Pr Robert Zatorre’s and Pr Sylvain Baillet’s groups. His work focuses on the identification of the causal links between the dynamics of neural activity and human cognitive functions. In his research he combines multimodal neuroimaging data and information-based neuromodulation methods (i.e., online TMS/visual stimulation configured to match specific ongoing spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity) with the aim of causally enhancing cognitive abilities in health and disease. His overarching interests are in the translational impact of such optimized neuromodulation approaches as personalized therapeutic tools and preventive solutions for pathology-associated neurocognitive deficits.


The Feindel Virtual Brain and Mind (VBM) Seminar Series will advance the vision of Dr. William Feindel (1918–2014), Former Director of the Neuro (1972–1984), to constantly bridge the clinical and research realms. The talks will highlight the latest advances and discoveries in neuropsychology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuroimaging.

Speakers will include scientists from across The Neuro, as well as colleagues and collaborators locally and from around the world. The series is intended to provide a virtual forum for scientists and trainees to continue to foster interdisciplinary exchanges on the mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of brain and cognitive disorders.

Contact Information

Contact: 
Sasha Kelly
Organization: 
Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital
Email: 
sasha.kelly [at] mcgill.ca
Office Phone: 
Mobile Phone: 
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