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Lifting Off and Flying High: Talent and Success in Canada

Mon, 2013-02-11 13:30 - Tue, 2013-02-12 18:00

February 11-12, 2013, Hotel Omni Mont-Royal (1050 Sherbrooke Street West) 

One of the oft-repeated clichés about Canada is that we unable to support success in several fields or to live comfortably with success when it is achieved.  These clichés often rest on the claim that we look too quickly to the state for innovation, that we are too cautious in investing our capital or commitment, and that we share with other cultures (Australia, for example)  a “tall poppy” syndrome which makes us want to cut down to size those who dare to rise too high.  Our curren

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2012 Cundill Prize Lecture--Primo Levi the Partisan

Thu, 2012-11-29 16:00

Sergio Luzzatto, Modern History Professor, University of Turin and Winner of the Cundill Prize in 2011 for his book “Padre Pio: Miracles and Politics in a Secular Age”

November 29, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Birks Heritage Chapel, 2nd floor (3520 University Street)

We usually think of Primo Levi as a witness.  Eventually, we think of him as the witness of the Final Solution.  And this, of course, corresponds to reality.  One might argue that no other Auschwitz survivor, worldwide, has been as literary powerful, ethically insightful, and historically infl

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Eakin Lecture delivered by Professor Karen Fricker--The Theatre of Attractions: How Robert Lepage makes movies onstage

Tue, 2012-11-13 17:00

McGill Faculty Club (3450 McTavish)

'Cinematic' is a term that is frequently used to describe the stage work of Québec theatrical auteur (and sometime filmmaker) Robert Lepage - but what does this actually mean? This presentation explores Lepage's theatremaking, arguing that filmic techniques - in particular, montage - are at the core of how he constructs stage stories.

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Andrew Stauffer – Nineteenth-century Mark-up Language and the Future of the Library

Fri, 2012-09-21 17:00 - 18:30
Leacock Building : 232, 855 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 2T7
Andrew Stauffer - New Tools for Online Humanities Scholarship

This lecture draws on the wealth of marginalia – names, dates, marks, signatures, comments, and drawings – which nineteenth century readers marked in their books. Prof Stauffer uses this evidence to reconstruct the history of how Victorian readers interacted with their books, and how they interacted with each other through their books. Projects such as Google Books make digital versions of these volumes more accessible to modern readers.

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