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parasites

New strains of parasites identified

Research on whipworms has implications for human health and animal conservation
Mon, 2015-01-12 11:04

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Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514-398-2189

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Contact: Rhia Ghai
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Source Site: /newsroom

Parasites and the evolution of primate culture

Study examines ‘costs’ of innovation, learning from others
Wed, 2014-12-03 10:15

Learning from others and innovation have undoubtedly helped advance civilization. But these behaviours can carry costs as well as benefits. And a new study by an international team of evolutionary biologists sheds light on how one particular cost – increased exposure to parasites – may affect cultural evolution in non-human primates.

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Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514-398-4201
Source Site: /newsroom

Freaky Friday: This Wormy World, Revisited

Fri, 2014-12-05 17:00 - 20:30
Redpath Museum : In Auditorium., 859 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 0C4
Price: Free with donation to Museum.

Exploring the gruesome truth about our world and its most powerful natural enemies - the parisite.

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Source Site: /redpath

Freaky Friday: This Wormy World, Revisited - Exploring the gruesome truth about our world and its most powerful natural enemies

Fri, 2014-12-05 17:00 - 20:30
Redpath Museum : In Auditorium., 859 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 0C4
Price: Free with donation to Museum.

By Victor Frankel (Ph.D. candidate, Biology McGill)

Source Site: /redpath

Target identified for a public health risk parasite

Thu, 2013-11-28 12:21

In the developing world, Cryptosporidium parvum has long been the scourge of freshwater. A decade ago, it announced its presence in the United States, infecting over 400,000 people – the largest waterborne-disease outbreak in the county’s history. Its rapid ability to spread, combined with an incredible resilience to water decontamination techniques, such as chlorination, led the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United Sates to add C. parvum to its list of public bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no reliable treatments for cryptosporidiosis, the disease caused by C. parvum, but that may be about to change with the identification of a target molecule by investigators at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC).

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Contact: Julie Robert
Organization: McGill University Health Centre
Office Phone: 514 934-1934 ext. 71381
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Source Site: /newsroom
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