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Learning a Second Language May Depend on How your Brain Talks to Itself

Wed, 2016-01-20 10:02

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute explore why learning a second language is easier for some people

Learning a second language is easier for some adults than others, and innate differences in how the various parts of the brain “talk” to one another may help explain why, according to a new study led by Chai Xiaoqian and Denise Klein, researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, The Neuro at McGill University.  The study was published January 20 in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Contact Information

Contact: Maya-Olivia Eyssen
Organization: The Neuro
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-3376
Mobile Phone: 514-699-3077
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Source Site: /neuro

The Next Page: Immigration and Professional Transitions: Language Integration

Wed, 2015-12-09 10:08

Language is important for any newcomer, particularly for those who wish to enter the job market. Communicating in the local language can help you through every step in the process: expanding your professional network, catching the attention of potential employers, and clinching a job interview. These two successful Montreal newcomers have followed that advice.

Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

First language wires brain for later language-learning

Tue, 2015-12-01 11:45

Research also demonstrates brain's plasticity and ability to adapt to new language environments

Contact Information

Contact: Lara Pierce
Organization: Dept. of Psychology, McGill University (English interviews)
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Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations, McGill University
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Source Site: /newsroom

Placement Test: Part-Time English Language

Wed, 2016-04-06 18:30 - 20:30

Placement Tests

Language and Intercultural Communication

LEARN: Music to his Ears

Mon, 2015-08-03 11:38

Masashi Usui has over 18 years of experience playing the saxophone. Yet when he applied to the Master of Music program at McGill’s Schulich School of Music, he was told that he needed to improve his English in order to be admitted.

Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

The Next Page: Natalie Zhayvoronok: A Better Career, and a Better Future

Fri, 2015-06-12 13:50

Natalie Zhayvoronok had a double-major in Translation and Education when she arrived in Montreal from her native Ukraine in the summer of 2010. She was planning to continue her career as an ESL teacher, but instead discovered that she couldn’t simply pick up where she left off.

Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

FINDING "LOST" LANGUAGES IN THE BRAIN

Mon, 2014-11-17 09:30

 Study has far-reaching implications for unconscious role of infant experiences on adult development

An infant’s mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, (as can happen in cases of international adoption) according to a new joint study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro and McGill University’s Department of Psychology. The study offers the first neural evidence that traces of the “lost” language remain in the brain.

Contact Information

Contact: Anita Kar
Organization: The Neuro
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The role of neural rhythmic entrainment in early language learning: Victoria Leong, PhD

Wed, 2014-11-05 15:00 - 16:00
Goodman Cancer Research Centre, Room 501 : 1160 av des Pins ouest, 1200 Pine Avenue West
Price: Free

<p>Please join us for a CRBLM Invited Lecture by Victoria Leong, PhD (Cambridge University), who will present "The role of rhythmic entrainment in early language learning" on Wednesday, November 5th at 3 pm in the Goodman Cancer Centre, Roo</p>

Contact Information

Contact: CRBLM Coordinator
Organization: The Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music
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Learning a new language alters brain development

Thu, 2013-08-29 10:16

Scientists at The Neuro find important time factor in second-language acquisition

The age at which children learn a second language can have a significant bearing on the structure of their adult brain, according to a new joint study by the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro at McGill University and Oxford University. The majority of people in the world learn to speak more than one language during their lifetime. Many do so with great proficiency particularly if the languages are learned simultaneously or from early in development.

Contact Information

Contact: Anita Kar
Organization: The Neuro
Email:
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