Post Doctoral Fellows

Peggy Chiappetta | Postdoctoral Researcher

margaret.chiappetta [at] mcgill.ca 

Bio: Peggy Chiappetta is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Social Studies of Medicine at McGill University. She received a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from York University and an M.A. in Science and Technology Studies from the University of British Columbia. From 2018 – 2019 she was a doctoral researcher at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Research Interests: Chiappetta is interested in the economic and financial aspects of pharmaceutical and biotech innovation. Her research focuses broadly on R&D financing, risk capital management, equity markets, new business models, technology transfer and research commercialization, open innovation, intellectual property and IP valuation.

Selected Publications:

Birch, Kean, Margaret Chiappetta, and Anna Artyushina (forthcoming 2020). “The problem of innovation in technoscientific capitalism: Policy implications of turning personal digital data into a private asset” Policy Studies.

Chiappetta, Margaret, and Kean Birch (2018). “Limits to Biocapital.” In The Routledge Handbook of Genomics, Health and Society. Eds. Stephen Hilgartner, Sahra Gibbon, Barbara Prainsaick, and Janelle Lamoreaux. London: Routledge.

Birch, Kean, David Tyfield, and Margaret Chiappetta (2018). “From Neoliberalizing Research to Researching Neoliberalism: STS and the Emergence of Commons 2.0.” In The SAGE Handbook of Neoliberalism. Eds. Damien Cahil, Martijn Konings, Melinda Cooper, and David Primrose. Thousand Oaks CA: SAGE


Nora Hutchinson | Postdoctoral fellow

nora.hutchinson [at] mail.mcgill.ca

Bio and Research Interests: I completed my medical degree at McGill University in 2012, followed by a Master of Philosophy degree at Cambridge University (UK) in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine, fully funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award. I then completed my residency in Internal Medicine at Brown University (USA), and ultimately returned to McGill in 2017 to obtain my fellowship in General Internal Medicine. I am currently a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Jonathan Kimmelman, pursing research on the ethics of pharmaceutical drug development and uninformative clinical trials.

Selected Publications:

Hutchinson N, Viranov E, Iasonos A, Kimmelman J. Ethical and Policy Issues for Seamless Phase 1 Oncology Trials. JCO (in press).

Hutchinson N, Capron A, Doussau A. Research participants should have the option to be notified of results of unknown but potential significance. AJOB. 2019;19(4): 78-80.

Hutchinson N, Baird G, Garg M. Examining the reading level of internet medical information for common internal medicine diagnoses. Am J Med. 2016;129(6): 637-9.


Kasia Tolwinski | Postdoctoral Researcher

kasia.tolwinski [at] mcgill.ca·ket49 [at] cornell.edu

Bio and Research Interests: Kasia Tolwinski holds a PhD in Science & Technology Studies from Cornell University. She is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Biomedical Ethics Unit in the Department of the Social Studies of Medicine at McGill University, where she is studying the social and ethical implications of novel precision medicine treatments for pediatric brain tumors. Her past and current projects focus on knowledge production and implementation in the biomedical sciences. This includes empirical projects on neuroscience, epigenetics, precision and genomic medicine, the return of genetic test results, and palliative and end of life care.

Most Recent Publications:

Tolwinski, K., A. Nemoianu, A.F. Bacaloiu, J. Venditto, F. D. Davis, and J.K. Wagner. “ ‘I Don’t Want to Go on Living this Way’: Desire for Hastened Death and the Ethics of Involuntary Hospitalization.” The American Journal of Bioethics, 19(10): 89-90.

Tolwinski, K. 2019. “Fraught Claims at the Intersection of Biology and Sociality: Managing Controversy in the Neuroscience of Poverty and Adversity.” Social Studies of Science, 49(2): 141-161

Tolwinski, K. 2013. “A New Genetics or an Epiphenomenon? Variations in the Discourse of Epigenetics Researchers.” New Genetics & Society, 32(4): 366-384.

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