April 7-8, 2022 Workshop - Atelier 7-8 avril 2022

Did you miss this event?

Avez-vous manqué notre événement ?

View the summary report here PDF icon summary_report_community-led_research_governance_workshop.pdf

Regardez la synthèse de l'atelier ici PDF icon synthese_de_latelier_gouvernance_de_la_recherche_par_une_communaute.pdf

Community-Led Research Governance:
Envisioning the Future through Dialogue

April 7th, 2022 11:00-16:00 EST
April 8th, 2022 12:00-14:00 EST

This virtual, two-day workshop will showcase the innovative and radical strategies of community-led research governance across Canada. The first day will consist of panel presentations by Indigenous and urban communities who will share their experiences with research, their community-based research ethics governance strategies, and their perspectives on how to re-envision current systems of research oversight for meaningful community involvement. The second day will provide interested communities, researchers, and those working in the research ethics space with the opportunity to join each other in conversation. Led by our expert facilitator, we will have breakout group and big group discussions on the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders, challenges, opportunities and resources, and finally, recommendations to secure greater community involvement in research governance.

This workshop will be virtual and have French/English simultaneous translation.

Did you miss the event?

Event Agenda:

Date Photos Speaker Biographies Presentation Title and Abstract

April 7th, 2022

11AM-1 PM

Aianóhon Kaylia Marquis

Tahatikonhsontontie (The Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Program Code of Research Ethics) LOGO

Treena Wasonti:io Delormier

Aianóhon Kaylia Marquis is Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) from the Kahnawà:ke Mohawk Territory, and has been the Network Manager for the Tahatikonhsontóntie’ Québec Network Environment for Indigenous Health Research since its inception. She has a background in psychology, project management, and entrepreneurship. She has most recently worked delivering projects for community and grassroots organizations related to environment protection, food security, social entrepreneurship, and early childhood education.


Dr. Treena Wasonti:io Delormier is Kanien’kehá:ka, and a member of the Wolf Clan from the Kahnawà:ke Mohawk Territory. An Associate Professor at McGill University’s School of Human Nutrition, she is also serving as the Associate Director of McGill's Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE). Her research focuses on the food and nutrition of Indigenous peoples, as well as health promotion interventions that address the social determinants of health underlying the health inequities in Indigenous populations, particularly in the context of colonialism.

Dr. Delormier's research approaches employ qualitative methodologies, with a focus on Indigenous and community-based methodologies. She is dedicated to building capacity in Indigenous health research through mentoring and training students, as well as community researchers.

 

Panel 1: Indigenous Research Governance

Title: The Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Program Code of Research Ethics: An Indigenous Approach to Ethical Health Research

Abstract: In 1994, in the Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) community of Kahnawake, a research project was initiated to address the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the community. Using a health promotion approach, schoolchildren would be supported to improve physical activity and nutrition for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes, and participatory research would examine the impact of the intervention. At the outset of the research, it became clear that guidelines were needed to ensure that the self-determination, responsibilities, and values of the Kahnawake people would be respected. After an 8-month process involving the community and research partners committing to an understanding of each others distinct obligations and responsibilities in research, the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Program Code of Research Ethics was complete. The Code was one of the first Indigenous community research ethics codes elaborated in Canada and served as a model for the chapter on Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada in the initial Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans. In our presentation we will discuss the participatory process that guided the Code’s development, we will describe the Indigenous principles and values that are represented in the code, and in the practices it supports. We will review the two revisions of the Code and provide examples for how research is approved in practices and some of the challenges to using the code.

 

April 7th, 2022

11AM- 1PM

Lorrilee McGregor

Lorrilee McGregor is an Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nation. She is an Assistant Professor at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine where she teaches about Indigenous peoples’ health. Dr. McGregor has been a member of the Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee since 2002.

MARRC logo

Panel 1: Indigenous Research Governance Cont.

Title: Anishinaabek Research Ethics and Governance

Abstract: The Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee (MARRC) serves seven First Nation communities on Manitoulin Island. Fed up with unethical research practices, the communities gathered to develop Guidelines for Ethical Aboriginal Research. For the past 20 years, the committee has supported research governance through ethics reviews, capacity building, policy development, and research conferences. This presentation will describe what research governance looks like in practice.

April 7th, 2022

11AM-1 PM

Guidelines for Research with Aboriginal Women

Suzy Basile comes from the Atikamekw community of Wemotaci, Quebec, Canada. She is professor at the School of Indigenous Studies of UQAT, at the Val-d’Or campus. In 2017, she set up a Research Laboratory on Indigenous Women Issues – Mikwatisiw and since January 1st, 2020 holds a Canada Research Chair on Indigenous Women Issues. She developed the Guidelines for Research with Aboriginal Women for Quebec Native Women Association published in 2012.

Panel 1: Indigenous Research Governance Cont.

Title : Guidelines for Research with Aboriginal Women

Abstract: These guidelines are intended to help manage the many research proposals received and make informed decisions on whether or not to become involved in those projects. The guidelines also outline an approach that will help establish a transparent, equal and mutually respectful relationship between the researchers and the Aboriginal women concerned.

April 7th, 2022

1PM-2 PM

 

Break

Break

April 7th, 2022

2PM-4 PM

Abena Offeh-Gyimah

The Jane Finch Community Research Partnership logo

Farwa Arshad

Abena Offeh-Gyimah is a writer, a researcher, and an advocate for an indigenous food sovereignty system. She's worked at Black Creek Community Farm as a coordinator for the youth farming program, with Building Roots as an urban gardener coordinator, with North York Community House as a Strong Neighborhood Coordinator, and currently the project lead with the Jane Finch Community Research Partnership which focuses on respectful and ethical research relationships for Jane and Finch. Her food business, Adda Blooms, seeks to work with small scale farmers to bring ancestral foods worldwide. Her blog, https://abenaoffehgyimah.com/, seeks to explore the intersections between food, culture, and equity.


Farwa Arshad is a 4th year student at York University majoring in Global Health and specializing in health policy, management, and systems. She works for the Jane Finch Community Research Partnership as a community research associate and is currently working on establishing an open-access community-based repository containing academic articles on the Jane Finch community. She is also involved in the York University community as the president of the Global Health Students’ Association, the representative body for the Global Health degree program, and as the careers coordinator for her faculty-associated colleges.

Panel 2: Urban Community-Led Research Governance

Title: The Jane Finch Community Research Partnership

Abstract: In this presentation, we will discuss our training modules, Tools for Conducting Research in Jane and Finch Community; the Jane Finch Research Collection, which is a digital repository for past research and scholarship about the neighbourhood, and the Principles for Conducting Research in Jane Finch document. These projects are committed to protecting residents of the Jane Finch community from harm caused by research; while educating researchers to adopt ethical and equitable research methods that move beyond harmful objectification and stigmatization of the Jane Finch community.

April 7th, 2022

2PM-4 PM

Research 101: A Manifest for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside

Nicolas Crier is a peer leader in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside community. He works with a number of initiativprogressive initiatives, including: Storytelling & Community Networking Liaison @ Megaphone Magazine, Peer co-lead Writer and Research Assistant with the UBC Transformative Health and Justice Research Cluster, Lived Experience Strategic Advisor with BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, and Peer Responder/Outreach staff at the PHS Mobile Overdose Prevention Unit. He also attends a Continuing Studies course through Simon Fraser University called Community Capacity Building. In all he does, he sends love to his 11 year old son, Money.


Scott Neufeld is a Lecturer in Community Psychology at Brock University and a PhD candidate in Social Psychology at Simon Fraser University. His community-based and qualitative research seeks to broaden and deepen understanding of substance-use related stigma and exclusion to address these issues more robustly. This has taken many forms but has included collaborative work in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside to develop grassroots guidelines for conducting ethical and respectful research with people who use drugs (http://bit.ly/R101Manifesto) and a comprehensive review of substance use-focused anti-stigma campaigns from across Canada (bit.ly/FIRST-antistigma). Check out more of Scott's research interests and writing here.


Jule Chapman is one of the research 101 CREW members and has been living in the Downtown Eastside (DTES) for the past 20 yrs. She is an outreach worker as well as a student journalist who is working with a magazine called Megaphone Magazine.

Panel 2: Urban Community-Led Research Governance Cont.

Title: Research 101: A Manifest for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside

Abstract: Co-authors of the groundbreaking resource publication known as Research 101: A Manifesto for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside, will present as a group on the history of the Research 101 project, the writing and publication of the Manifesto, and sharing how the next steps towards their collective vision of building a Community Research Ethics Workshop in the Downtown Eastside has taught them some valuable lessons, and how the process even inspired a documentary film.

April 7th, 2022

2PM-4 PM

Research 102 Rylan Kafara is a long-time city-centre worker, volunteer, and activist. Currently, he is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation at the University of Alberta. He is studying the ways city-centre residents use care, creativity, and connection to navigate houselessness.

Panel 2: Urban Community-Led Research Governance Cont.

Title: Research 102: Meaningful Activist Research in Treaty 6 Territory

Abstract: Research 102 was created in late 2019 and early 2020 during a series of workshops with city-centre residents, activists, and workers from harm-reduction centres, social organizations, and academic institutions in city-centre Edmonton. The purpose of Research 102 was to help ensure a collaborative and mutually beneficial research process for everyone involved in a city-centre project. This presentation explains that research process, guided by the “five spokes of the research wheel”, and how Research 102 was used in projects since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

April 8, 2022      

April 8th, 2022

12PM- 2PM

   

Discussion of Community Involvement in Research Governance in Canada

The second day will provide interested communities, researchers, and those working in the research ethics space with the opportunity to join each other in conversation. Led by our expert facilitator, Julie Bull, we will have breakout group and big group discussions on the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders, challenges, opportunities and resources, and finally, recommendations to secure greater community involvement in research governance

Thank you to our sponsors!  

Social Studies and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Biomedical Ethics Unit (BMEU), McGill University
Social Studies of Medicine (SSoM), McGill University
Healthy Brains, Healthy Lives (HBHL)
Réseau Québecois sur le suicide, les troubles de l’humeur et les troubles associés (RQSHA)
Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM) – Community Information and Epidemiological Technologies (CIET)
Learning Exchange, University of British Columbia
Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ)
Overdose Prevention Society
Social Justice Research Institute, Brock University
Research Ethics Board, University of British Columbia

Organizers:

Phoebe Friesen, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Ethics Unit, Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University
Alize Gunay, MSc Candidate, Family Medicine, Biomedical Ethics
Emily Doerksen, MSc Candidate, Human Genetics, Biomedical Ethics
Scott Neufeld, Lecturer, Community Psychology, Brock University

Gouvernance de la recherche par la communauté :
Envisager l'avenir par le dialogue

le 7 avril 2022 11h00 - 16h00 HNE
le 8 avril 2022 12h00 - 14h00 HNE

Cet atelier virtuel de deux jours présentera les stratégies novatrices et radicales de la gouvernance communautaire de la recherche au Canada. La première journée consistera en des présentations de groupes d'experts par des communautés autochtones et urbaines qui partageront leurs expériences en matière de recherche, leurs stratégies de gouvernance de l'éthique de la recherche communautaire et leurs perspectives sur la façon de repenser les systèmes actuels de surveillance de la recherche pour une participation significative de la communauté. La deuxième journée permettra aux communautés intéressées, aux chercheurs et à ceux qui travaillent dans le domaine de l'éthique de la recherche de se réunir pour discuter. Sous la direction de notre animatrice experte, nous aurons des discussions en petits groupes et en plénière sur les rôles et les responsabilités des intervenants, les défis, les possibilités et les ressources, et enfin, des recommandations pour assurer une plus grande implication de la communauté dans la gouvernance de la recherche.

Cet atelier virtuel sera proposé avec une traduction simultanée français/anglais.

Ordre du jour de l'événement :

Date Photos Biographies des conférenciers Titre et résumé de la présentation  :

7 avril 2022

11h-13h

Aianóhon Kaylia Marquis

Tahatikonhsontontie (The Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Program Code of Research Ethics) LOGO

Treena Wasonti:io Delormier

Aianóhon Kaylia Marquis est Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) du territoire mohawk de Kahnawake et fait partie de l’équipe de l’Environnement réseau pour la recherche sur la santé des Autochtones du Québec (ERRSA) depuis sa création. Elle a une formation en psychologie, en gestion de projets et en entrepreneuriat. Elle a récemment travaillé à la réalisation de projets pour des organisations communautaires et populaires concernant la protection de l’environnement, la sécurité alimentaire, l’entrepreneuriat social et l’éducation de la petite enfance.


Treena Wasonti:io Delormier est membre du clan du Loup de la nation Kanien’kehá:ka, du territoire mohawk de Kahnawà:ke. Elle est professeure agrégée à l’École de nutrition humaine de l’Université McGill, ainsi que directrice associée du Centre d’études sur la nutrition et l’environnement des peuples autochtones de l’Université McGill. Ses recherches portent principalement sur les denrées alimentaires et la nutrition des peuples autochtones, ainsi que sur des interventions de promotion de la santé axées sur les déterminants sociaux de la santé qui sont à la base des inégalités en matière de santé au sein des populations autochtones, notamment dans le contexte du colonialisme.

La Pre Delormier privilégie les méthodologies indigènes et communautaires dans ses recherches qualitatives. Elle œuvre au renforcement des capacités de recherche en santé autochtone par le mentorat et la formation d’étudiants et d’étudiantes, ainsi que de chercheurs issus de la communauté.

Panel 1 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche (approches autochtones)

Titre : Le Code d’éthique du projet de prévention du diabète des écoles de Kahnawake : Une approche autochtone à la recherche éthique en santé

Résumé : En 1994, un projet de recherche était lancé pour lutter contre la forte prévalence du diabète de type 2 dans la communauté Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) de Kahnawake. En adoptant une approche de promotion de la santé, on encouragerait les élèves à améliorer leur activité physique et leur alimentation en vue de la prévention primaire du diabète de type 2, et on effectuerait une recherche participative pour examiner l’impact de l’intervention. Dès le début de la recherche, la nécessité de lignes directrices s’est imposée pour garantir le respect de l’autodétermination, des responsabilités et des valeurs de la communauté de Kahnawake. Au terme d’un processus de huit mois au cours duquel la communauté et les partenaires de recherche se sont engagés à comprendre leurs obligations et responsabilités respectives en matière de recherche, le Code d’éthique du projet de prévention du diabète dans les écoles de Kahnawake voyait le jour. Il a été l’un des premiers codes d’éthique de la recherche des communautés autochtones élaborés au Canada et a servi de modèle pour le chapitre sur la recherche impliquant les Premières Nations, les Inuits ou les Métis du Canada de l’Énoncé initial de politique des trois conseils : Éthique de la recherche avec des êtres humains. Notre présentation portera sur le processus participatif qui a guidé l’élaboration du Code et décrira les principes et les valeurs autochtones qui sont représentés dans le code et dans les pratiques qu’il soutient. Nous passerons en revue les deux révisions du code et donnerons des exemples de la façon dont la recherche est approuvée dans la pratique et certains des défis liés à l’utilisation du code.

7 avril 2022

11h-13h

Lorrilee McGregor

Lorrilee McGregor : Anichinabée de la Première Nation de la rivière Whitefish, Lorrilee McGregor est professeure adjointe à l’École de médecine du Nord de l’Ontario, en santé des peuples autochtones. Elle est membre du Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee depuis 2002.

MARRC logo

Panel 1 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche (approches autochtones) cont.

Titre : Éthique et gouvernance de la recherche Anishinaabek 

Résumé : Le Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee (MARRC) est au service de sept communautés des Premières Nations de l’île de Manitoulin. Insatisfaites des pratiques non éthiques en recherche, les communautés ont conjointement élaboré les Guidelines for Ethical Aboriginal Research (Lignes directrices pour la recherche éthique sur les Autochtones). Depuis 20 ans, le comité soutient la gouvernance de la recherche par l’examen de l’éthique, le renforcement des capacités, l’élaboration de politiques et des conférences sur la recherche. Cette présentation décrira ce que signifie la gouvernance de la recherche dans la pratique.

7 avril 2022

11h-13h

Guidelines for Research with Aboriginal Women Suzy Basile, originaire de Wemotaci au Québec, est professeure à l’École d’études autochtones de l’Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, au campus de Val-d’Or. En 2017, elle a constitué le Laboratoire de recherche sur les enjeux relatifs aux femmes autochtones – Mikwatisiw et est devenue le 1er janvier 2020 titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les enjeux relatifs aux femmes autochtones. On lui doit les Lignes directrices en matière de recherche avec les femmes autochtones pour l’Association des femmes autochtones du Québec, publiées en 2012.

Panel 1 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche (approches autochtones) cont.

Titre : Lignes directrices pour la recherche avec les femmes autochtones

Résumé : Lignes directrices en matière de recherche avec les femmes autochtones : elles ont pour but d’aider les femmes autochtones à mieux gérer les multiples propositions de projet de recherche reçues ainsi qu’à prendre des décisions éclairées sur leur éventuelle implication ou non dans les projets proposés. Ces lignes directrices proposent également une démarche à suivre afin d’arriver à l’établissement d’une relation égalitaire, transparente et mutuellement respectueuse entre les femmes autochtones et les chercheurs.

7 avril 2022

13h-14h

 

Pause

Pause

7 avril 2022

14h-16h

Abena Offeh-Gyimah

The Jane Finch Community Research Partnership logo

Farwa Arshad

Abena Offeh-Gyimah est écrivaine, chercheuse et militante pour un système de souveraineté alimentaire indigène. Elle a travaillé à la Black Creek Community Farm comme coordinatrice du programme d’agriculture pour les jeunes, avec Building Roots comme coordinatrice de jardinage urbain, avec la North York Community House comme coordinatrice du programme Strong Neighborhood, et elle est actuellement responsable de projet avec le Partenariat de recherche de la communauté Jane Finch qui porte sur des relations de recherche respectueuses et éthiques pour la communauté. Son commerce alimentaire, Adda Blooms, cherche à collaborer avec les petits exploitants agricoles afin de diffuser des aliments ancestraux dans le monde entier. Son blogue, https://abenaoffehgyimah.com/, cherche à explorer les intersections entre l’alimentation, la culture et l’équité.


Farwa Arshad est étudiante en 4e année à l’Université York où elle effectue une majeure en santé mondiale et se spécialise en politique, gestion et systèmes de santé. Elle travaille pour le Partenariat de recherche de la communauté Jane Finch comme associée de recherche communautaire et elle s’emploie actuellement à constituer un dépôt communautaire à libre accès contenant des articles universitaires sur la communauté Jane Finch. Elle s’investit aussi dans la communauté de l’Université de York en tant que présidente de la Global Health Students’ Association, l’instance qui représente le programme de diplôme en santé mondiale, et en tant que coordinatrice de carrières pour les collèges associés à sa Faculté.

Panel 2 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche en milieu urbain

Title: Partenariat de recherche de la communauté Jane Finch

Résumé : Notre présentation abordera nos modules de formation, Tools for Conducting Research in Jane and Finch Community; la Jane Finch Research Collection, qui est un dépôt numérique pour les recherches et les études passées sur le quartier, et le document Principles for Conducting Research in Jane Finch. Ces projets visent à protéger les résidents de la communauté Jane Finch des préjudices causés par la recherche, tout en apprenant aux chercheurs à adopter des méthodes de recherche éthiques et équitables qui vont au-delà de l’objectivation et de la stigmatisation préjudiciables de la communauté Jane Finch.

7 avril 2022

14h-16h

Research 101: A Manifest for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside

Nicolas Crier est un pair animateur dans la communauté du Downtown Eastside de Vancouver. Il travaille avec un certain nombre d’initiatives progressistes, dont @ Megaphone Magazine où il s’occupe de communication narrative et de liaison avec les réseaux communautaires; le Transformative Health and Justice Research Cluster de l’UBC, où il est corédacteur et assistant à la recherche; les BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, où il est conseiller stratégique en matière d’expérience vécue; et PHS Mobile Overdose Prevention Unit, où il est intervenant auprès des pairs et membre du personnel de sensibilisation. Il suit également un cours d’études permanentes de l’Université Simon Fraser intitulé « Community Capacity Building ». Tout ce qu’il fait est empreint d’amour pour son fils de 11 ans, Money.


Scott Neufeld est chargé de cours en psychologie communautaire à l’Université Brock et doctorant en psychologie sociale à l’Université Simon Fraser. Ses travaux de recherche communautaire et qualitative visent à élargir et à approfondir la compréhension de la stigmatisation et de l’exclusion liées à la consommation de drogues afin de mieux traiter ces questions. Sa démarche a pris de nombreuses formes, dont une collaboration dans le Downtown Eastside de Vancouver pour élaborer des lignes directrices locales en vue de recherches éthiques et respectueuses de l’environnement avec des personnes consommant de la drogue (http://bit.ly/R101Manifesto) et un examen approfondi des campagnes anti-stigmatisation axées sur la consommation de substances qui sont menées au Canada (bit.ly/FIRST-antistigma). Pour en savoir plus sur les intérêts en recherche et les écrits de Scott, cliquez ici.


Jule Chapman est l'un des membres du CREW de recherche 101 et vit dans le Downtown Eastside depuis 20 ans. Elle est une travailleuse de proximité ainsi qu'une journaliste étudiante qui travaille avec un magazine appelé Megaphone Magazine.

Panel 2 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche en milieu urbain cont.

Titre: Research 101: Manifeste pour la recherche éthique dans le Downtown Eastside

Résumé : Les coauteurs de la publication de ressources intitulée Research 101: A Manifesto for Ethical Research in the Downtown Eastside, présenteront en groupe l’historique du projet Research 101, la rédaction et la publication du Manifeste. Ils aborderont aussi de quelle façon les prochaines étapes en vue de créer collectivement un atelier d’éthique de la recherche communautaire dans le Downtown Eastside leur ont appris des leçons utiles, et de quelle façon le processus a même inspiré un documentaire.

7 avril 2022

14h-16h

Research 102 Rylan Kafara est un travailleur, un bénévole et un militant de longue date du centre-ville. Il est doctorant à la Faculté de kinésiologie, de sport et de récréation de l’Université de l’Alberta. Il étudie les façons dont les résidents des centres-villes utilisent les soins, la créativité et les liens pour faire face au sans-abrisme.

Panel 2 : Stratégies de gouvernance de la recherche en milieu urbain cont.

Titre: Research 102: Recherche militante significative dans le territoire du Traité numéro 6

Résumé : Research 102 a été créé à la fin de 2019 et au début de 2020 lors d’une série d’ateliers avec des résidents du centre-ville, des militants et des travailleurs de centres de réduction des méfaits, d’organisations sociales et d’établissements universitaires du centre-ville d’Edmonton. Le but de Research 102 était d’aider à garantir un processus de recherche collaboratif et mutuellement avantageux pour toutes les personnes associées à un projet au centre-ville. La présentation explique ce processus de recherche, guidé par les « cinq rayons de la roue de la recherche », et la façon dont Research 102 a été utilisé dans des projets depuis le début de la pandémie de COVID-19.

8 avril 2022

     

8 avril 2022

12h-14h

   

Discussion sur la participation de la communauté à la'éthique gouvernance de la recherche au Canada

La deuxième journée permettra aux communautés intéressées, aux chercheurs et à ceux qui travaillent dans le domaine de l'éthique de la recherche de se réunir pour discuter. Sous la direction de notre animatrice experte, Julie Bull, nous aurons des discussions en petits groupes et en grand groupe sur les rôles et les responsabilités des parties prenantes, les défis, les opportunités et les ressources, et enfin, des recommandations pour assurer une plus grande implication de la communauté dans la gouvernance de la recherche.

 

Merci à nos sponsors!

Social Studies and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Biomedical Ethics Unit (BMEU), McGill University
Social Studies of Medicine (SSoM), McGill University
Healthy Brains, Healthy Lives (HBHL)
Réseau Québecois sur le suicide, les troubles de l’humeur et les troubles associés (RQSHA)
Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM) – Community Information and Epidemiological Technologies (CIET)
Learning Exchange, University of British Columbia
Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ)
Overdose Prevention Society
Social Justice Research Institute, Brock University
Research Ethics Board, University of British Columbia

Organisateurs !

Phoebe Friesen, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Ethics Unit, Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University
Alize Gunay, MSc Candidate, Family Medicine, Biomedical Ethics
Emily Doerksen, MSc Candidate, Human Genetics, Biomedical Ethics
Scott Neufeld, Lecturer, Community Psychology, Brock University

Follow Biomedical Ethics on:

Back to top