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Hidden magma pools pose volcanic eruption risks we can’t yet detect

New research co-authored by McGill Earth and Planetary Science professor John Stix challenges conventional views about scientists' ability to reliably predict volcanic eruptions.

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Published: 11 May 2021

Record numbers connect, learn and have fun at McGill Physics Hackathon

The 5th edition of McGill Physics Hackathon brought together a record breaking number of participants in this 2020 online event. 

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Published: 5 May 2021

Sea level rise: rapid and unstoppable unless Paris Agreement targets met

Image Caption: The Mackenzie River Delta on the Beaufort Sea, a low-lying region in the Canadian Arctic that is vulnerable to rising seas in a warming climate. CREDIT: Nadia and Harold Gomez

Published: 5 May 2021

“The show must go on!”: Undergraduate Poster Showcase brings students to the virtual stage

McGill Science student Catherine Wang attended the Faculty of Science’s Undergraduate Poster Showcase to support her peers. Here, she shares her impressions of the event.

Published: 21 Apr 2021

Bicentennial Family Science Day

We're celebrating 24h de science and McGill's Bicentennial as we move into another century of community outreach! The Science Outreach groups have all kinds of fun in store in this Faculty of Science Signature Event. Join in the celebration!
Published: 20 Apr 2021

Fast radio bursts shown to include lower frequency radio waves than previously detected

Since fast radio bursts (FRBs) were first discovered over a decade ago, scientists have puzzled over what could be generating these intense flashes of radio waves from outside of our galaxy. In a gradual process of elimination, the field of possible explanations has narrowed as new pieces of information are gathered about FRBs – how long they last, the frequencies of the radio waves detected, and so on.

Published: 15 Apr 2021

Telescopes unite in unprecedented observations of famous black hole

In April 2019, scientists released the first image of a black hole in the galaxy M87 using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). However, that remarkable achievement was just the beginning of the science story to be told. McGill University astronomers were part of this global effort.

Published: 14 Apr 2021

Vanier Scholar at the Museum!

Victoria Glynn, the public program representative from GARM (Graduate Association of the Redpath Museum), has won the prestigious Vanier Scholarship.

Published: 13 Apr 2021

Family Science Day: What is neuroscience? History of neuroscience at McGill

As part of McGill’s Bicentennial and 24h de science, join BrainReach on a virtual tour of the brain and its fascinating neurons followed by a brief history of neuroscience. Young minds will discover how scientists at McGill set on a journey to understand the human brain.

 

Topic: What is neuroscience? History of neuroscience at McGill

Published: 6 Apr 2021

First images of magnetic fields at the edge of black hole in M87 Galaxy

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration, which includes researchers from McGill University, who produced the first ever image of a black hole, has revealed this week a new view of the massive object at the centre of the M87 galaxy: how it looks in polarized light. This is the first time astronomers have been able to measure polarization, a signature of magnetic fields, this close to the edge of a black hole.

Published: 25 Mar 2021

Celebrity chef Bruno Feldeisen guest stars in baking-themed biology class at McGill

BIOL 201 students baked protein-shaped cookies so good even Chef Bruno Feldeisen from The Great Canadian Baking Show couldn't resist.

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Published: 24 Mar 2021

It’s snowing plastic

The snow may be melting, but it is leaving pollution behind in the form of micro- and nano-plastics according to a McGill study that was recently published in Environmental Pollution. The pollution is largely due to the relatively soluble plastics found in antifreeze products (polyethylene glycols) that can become airborne and picked up by the snow.

Published: 17 Mar 2021

Air pollution: The silent killer called PM2.5

Millions of people die prematurely every year from diseases and cancer caused by air pollution. The first line of defence against this carnage is ambient air quality standards. Yet, according to researchers from McGill University, over half of the world’s population lives without the protection of adequate air quality standards.

Published: 11 Mar 2021

The Undergraduate Poster Showcase 2021: The show must go on!

Office of Science Education Communications Assistant Brent Jamsa sat down with four students to discuss their upcoming presentations at the second annual Undergraduate Poster Showcase. This year, the highly-anticipated event will be hosted on March 16, 6-8 PM EST via Zoom. Register here to attend: https://mcgill.ca/x/odx.

Published: 9 Mar 2021

Will climate change outpace species adaptation?

Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.

Published: 4 Mar 2021

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