Theodora Vardouli

Assistant Professor
PhD in Architecture: Design and Computation (MIT)
SMArchS in Design and Computation (MIT)
Post-Graduate Diploma in Architectural Design - Space - Culture (National Technical University of Athens)
Diploma in Architectural Engineering (National Technical University of Athens)
   — Licensed Architect by the Technical Chamber of Greece

Macdonald-Harrington Building
Room 303
Tel. (514) 398-6709

theodora.vardouli [at] mcgill.ca (Email)

Teaching 2017-2018

ARCH 303 Design & Construction 1, Fall 2017

ARCH 406 Design & Construction 4, Winter 2018

ARCH 512 Architectural Modeling, Winter 2018

 

Situated at the intersection of historical inquiry and critical practice, my research interrogates the effects of computation and computational technologies on discourse about design and making. I am particularly interested in techniques of calculating, modeling, and representing that underlie contemporary digital media, their symbolic meanings for architectural cultures, and operational implications for creative design. Cross-pollinating methods from science and technology studies and architectural history, my recent scholarship has examined transitions and transactions between architectural and mathematical modernism in the 1960s through the lens of graph theory — a mathematical technique that I followed across disparate contexts of architectural theory production in Europe and North America. Currently, I am working on extending and expanding biographies of technical practices that catalyzed architects’ early experiments with computers and computation. Alongside this critical historical project, I am actively investigating collisions between perceptual shape, material things, and structural abstraction while designing and making with digital tools. Before joining McGill, I was a Presidential Fellow for doctoral studies at MIT, where I was a member of the Computational Making Research Group and the founder of ReaDCG, the MIT Design and Computation reading seminar. I am co-editor of Computational Making (Design Studies, 2015) and Computer Architectures: Constructing the Common Ground (Routledge, forthcoming 2018), a collection of essays by architectural historians, science and technology studies scholars, and media theorists that rethinks the history and historiography of architecture and the computer.

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