Publications

Media@McGill - Celebrating Five Years
Commemorative Booklet (2011)

In 2011, Media@McGill celebrated its five-year anniversary as a hub of research, scholarship and public outreach on issues and controversies in media, technology and culture. Download the commemorative booklet to read about Media@McGill's achievements during five exceptional years of observing the media.

 

 


“Conflict[ed] Reporting,” special issue of Photography & Culture (2015)

Christine Ross, Tamar Tembeck, Theodora Tsentas, eds. “Conflict[ed] Reporting,” special issue of Photography & Culture, vol. 8, no. 2 (July 2015).

Special issue of Photography & Culture is based on an international symposium hosted by Media@McGill in Montreal, Canada, in November 2012.

Titled Conflict[ed] Reporting: War and Photojournalism in the Digital Age, the symposium brought together communications and arts scholars alongside war reporters and photojournalists to raise a light to questions including the following: Has digital technology altered the practice of conflict photography? What new ways could professional photographers seek to engage compassion-fatigued audiences? What are the ethical implications of publishing amateur-produced content in the mainstream media? The aim of this special issue of Photography & Culture is to elaborate on this theme, among others, with a collection of essays and images from the participants of the symposium (Susan Carruthers, Donald Matheson, Louie Palu, Sharon Sliwinski), as well as additional contributors (Ariella Azoulay, Reilley Bishop-Stall, Liam Kennedy), whose work tackles the visibility and, subsequently, the optics of contemporary war in a changing digital landscape.


The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age (2016)

Darin Barney, Gabriella Coleman, Christine Ross, Jonathan Sterne, and Tamar Tembeck, eds. The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age (2016)

An unprecedented transdisciplinary call to reassess the meaning of participation in the digital age

Structured along four axes investigating the relations between participation and politics, surveillance, openness, and aesthetics, The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age comprises fifteen essays that explore the promises, possibilities, and failures of contemporary participatory media practices. This book represents the most comprehensive and transdisciplinary endeavor to date to examine the nature, place, and value of participation in the digital age.