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Certificate in Ecological Agriculture (30 credits)

Offered by: Agricultural Economics     Degree: Certificate in Ecological Agriculture

Program Requirements

This 30-credit certificate program is very similar to the Minor program and is designed to focus on the principles underlying the practice of ecological agriculture. The certificate may be of special interest to professional agrologists who want further training, as well as formal recognition that they have completed a coherent program of courses beyond their B.Sc. studies.

Students holding a B.Sc. in agriculture or a related area are eligible to register for this program provided that they are otherwise acceptable for admission to the University. Students who have completed the Minor or specialization in Ecological Agriculture are not permitted to register for this program.

For information on academic advising, see: http://www.mcgill.ca/macdonald/studentinfo/advising

General Regulations

To obtain a certificate in Ecological Agriculture, students must complete a minimum total of 30 credits from the courses as given below.

Notes:

1. Most courses listed at the 300 level and higher have prerequisites. Although instructors may waive prerequisite(s) in some cases, students are urged to prepare their program of study to ensure that they have met all conditions.

2. Students using AGRI 310 toward the requirements of the Specialization/Minor/Certificate are limited to an experience on farms or other enterprises that are organic, biodynamic, or practising permaculture. The placement must be approved by the academic adviser for the specialization/Minor/certificate.

Required Courses (12 credits)

  • AGEC 430 Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : Examination of North American and international agriculture, food and resource policies, policy instruments, programs and their implications. Economic analysis applied to the principles, procedures and objectives of various policy actions affecting agriculture, and the environment.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Gordon Hickey (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent
  • AGRI 215 Agro-Ecosystems Field Course (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Through case studies and field trips, students will examine the problems and constraints within the Canadian agro-ecosystem, including the interrelationships among food production, the environment, agricultural policy and social issues. Research in this field of study will also be introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg, Roger I Cue (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 215.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $51.30 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips to agricultural enterprises. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250
  • SOIL 535 Ecological Soil Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : The physical and chemical environment of soil organisms; survey of soil microflora and fauna; processes and interactions in the soil-plant system at local and global scales; human impacts and management of soil biota; critical analysis and interpretation of primary scientific literature in soil ecology.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisites: ENVB 210 and AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.
    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 335.

Complementary Courses (18 credits)

18 credits chosen from the following, in consultation with the Academic Adviser for Ecological Agriculture.

  • AGRI 310 Internship in Agriculture/Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Internship on working farms or in other appropriate businesses of the agri-food/environment industries.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 201D1/D2.
  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Two 2-hour conferences
  • AGRI 435 Soil and Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Management of soil and water systems for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Human health and safety concerns. Water-table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Zhiming Qi, Asim Biswas (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • This course carries an additional charge of $30 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to a field trip. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • ANSC 312 Animal Health and Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : An introduction to the pathogenesis and control of diseases in farm animals. Immune response and other protective mechanisms. Implications of animal diseases and drug therapy for product safety and public health.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Vilceu Bordignon (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour conference
  • ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Modern concepts of integrated control techniques and principles of insect pest management, with emphasis on biological control (use of predators, parasites and pathogens against pest insects), population monitoring, and manipulation of environmental, behavioral and physiological factors in the pest's way of life. Physical, cultural, and genetic controls and an introduction to the use of non-toxic biochemical controls (attractants, repellents, pheromones, antimetabolites).

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have previously taken ENTO 452
    • 3 lectures
  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Christopher Buddle (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205
  • ENVB 415 Ecosystem Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Through the examination of cases studies presented in a modular format, students will be exposed to a variety of ecosystem processes. Choice of components, interactions and type of management to achieve desired endpoints will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg, Elena Bennett (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: BREE 327 and WILD 205 or ENVB 305
  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite(s): LSCI 204 or LSCI 230 or AEBI 212 or ENVR 202 or permission of the instructor.
  • NUTR 341 Global Food Security (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Food insecurity is one of the most critical issues humanity has faced in history. The magnitude of this phenomenon, reflected in its worldwide presence and in the number of individuals affected, makes it an imperative component of all nations' and of all internaltional agencies' agendas. Its complexity of determinants and its numerous consequences require the involvement of multipe disciplines and sectors. McGill undergraduate students as future professionals tackling global issues require an integrated and multidisciplinary training on food security.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: NUTR207 or permission of Instructor
  • PLNT 302 Forage Crops and Pastures (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Ecology, management, and physiology of forage crops with emphasis on establishment, growth, maintenance, harvesting, and preservation; value as livestock feed in terms of nutritional composition and role in environmental conservation.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Philippe Seguin (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 or AEBI 211 or WILD 200
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 331.
  • PLNT 307 Agroecology of Vegetables and Fruits (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of selected vegetable and fruit agroecosystems. Includes selection of varieties and management from seedling to harvest to storage.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: AEBI 210 or permission of the instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 321.
  • PLNT 434 Weed Biology and Control (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : A study of the biology of undesirable vegetation as related to the principles of prevention and physical, biological, managerial and chemical control. Emphasis on the environmental impact of the different methods of weed control.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Alan K Watson (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210
  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Frieda Beauregard (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $25.65 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • SOIL 326 Soils in a Changing Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Soil processes responsible for soil formation will be studied and the impact of changes to the physical and chemical environment will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2015

    Instructors: Asim Biswas (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: A previous course in soil science, geography, geology or permission of instructor.
  • WILD 424 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Systematics, morphology, biology and ecology of parasitic protozoa, flatworms, roundworms and arthropods with emphasis on economically and medically important species.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Petra Rohrbach (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 424 (formerly ZOOL 424).
  • WOOD 441 Integrated Forest Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Woodland Resources : The study of silviculture and silvics and their application to forest management to sustain the production of wood and other ecological goods and services such as wildlife, water and landscape in natural forests and rural environments (agroforestry). Acquisition of practical skills in forest surveying and computer simulation of forest growth.

    Terms: Winter 2016

    Instructors: Benoit Cote (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: ENVB 210 or ENVB 222 or ENVB 305 or permission of instructor.
Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 28, 2015) (disclaimer)