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Major Environment - Biodiversity and Conservation (63 credits)

Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Science

Program Requirements

This domain (63 credits including core) is open only to students in the B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) Major in Environment or B.Sc. Major in Environment program.

This domain links the academic study of biological diversity with the applied field of conservation biology. The study of biological diversity, or "biodiversity," lies at the intersection of evolution with ecology and genetics, combining the subdisciplines of evolutionary ecology, evolutionary genetics, and ecological genetics. It has two main branches: the creation of diversity and the maintenance of diversity. Both processes are governed by a general mechanism of selection acting over different scales of space and time. This gives rise to a distinctive set of principles and generalizations that regulate rates of diversification and levels of diversity, as well as the abundance or rarity of different species. Conservation biology constitutes the application of these principles in the relevant social and economic context to the management of natural systems, with the object of preventing the extinction of rare species and maintaining the diversity of communities. As the impact of industrialization and population growth on natural systems has become more severe, conservation has emerged as an important area of practical endeavour.

Suggested First Year (U1) Courses

For suggestions on courses to take in your first year (U1), you can consult the "MSE Student Handbook" available on the MSE website (http://www.mcgill.ca/mse), or contact Ms. Kathy Roulet, the Program Adviser (kathy [dot] roulet [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

Program Requirements

Note: Students are required to take a maximum of 30 credits at the 200 level and a minimum of 12 credits at the 400 level or higher in this program. This includes core and required courses.

Location Note: When planning their schedule and registering for courses, students should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Core: Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core required courses are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: George McCourt, James W Fyles, Frederic Fabry, Anthony Ricciardi, Eyad Hashem Atallah (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Nicolas Kosoy, Elena Bennett, Kevin Manaugh, Christopher Barrington-Leigh (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Brian Leung, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, George McCourt, Sylvie de Blois (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: David Goodin, Julia Freeman (Fall) Jaye Dana Ellis, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta (Fall) Jeffrey Cardille, Julia Freeman, Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001
    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051
    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher
  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Peter Gilbert Brown, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall) David Goodin, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203
    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Core: Complementary Course - Senior Research Project (3 credits)

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.
  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Julia Freeman, George McCourt (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301
    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.
  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Ana Spalding, Catherine Potvin (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Domain: Complementary Courses (42 credits)

42 credits of complementary courses are selected as follows:

9 credits - basic courses in the Biological Principles of Diversity, Systematics, and Conservation
3 credits - Ecology
3 credits - Statistics
9 credits - Interface between Science, Policy, and Management
3 credits - Field Courses
6 credits - General Scientific Principles
3 credits - Social Science
6 credits - Organisms and Diversity

Biological Principles of Diversity/Systematics/Conservation:

9 credits are chosen from basic courses in the biological principles of diversity, systematics, and conservation as follows:

One of:

  • AEBI 212 Evolution and Phylogeny (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : A phylogenetic-based overview of the tree of life and examination of relationships between major taxa, from bacteria and archaea to eukaryotes. Evolution will be discussed via topics including: evolution by natural selection, neo-Darwinism and alternatives, myths and misconceptions in evolution, species and speciation.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Terry A Wheeler (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 212.
  • BIOL 304 Evolution (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course will show how the theory of evolution by natural selection provides the basis for understanding the whole of biology. The first half of the course describes the process of selection, while the second deals with evolution in the long term.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gregor Rolshausen (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 and BIOL 215 or ENVR 202

One of:

  • AEBI 211 Organisms 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Introduction to the biology, physiology, structure and function of heterotrophs and their interactions with other organisms. This course will focus on animals in terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. Topics include bioenergetics and functional metabolism, adaptations to environments, animal-animal, animal-plant, and animal-pathogen interactions.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 200
  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Virginie Millien, Hans Carl Larsson, Graham Bell (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours lecture and 1 three-hour laboratory
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202

One of:

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Andrew Gonzalez, Heather Gray, David M Green (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 OR both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
  • WILD 421 Wildlife Conservation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Study of current controversial issues focusing on wildlife conservation. Topics include: animal rights, exotic species, ecotourism, urban wildlife, multi-use of national parks, harvesting of wildlife, biological controls, and endangered species.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 421.

Ecology:

One of:

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gregor Fussmann, Frederic Guichard (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour computer lab/tutorial
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Christopher Buddle (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205

Statistics:

One of:

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • BIOL 373 Biometry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Elementary statistical methods in biology. Introduction to the analysis of biological data with emphasis on the assumptions behind statistical tests and models. Use of statistical techniques typically available on computer packages.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Brian Leung (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory
    • Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent
    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

Science, Policy, and Management:

9 credits are chosen from interface between science, policy, and management as follows:

* Note: You may take AGEC 200 or ECON 208, but not both.

  • AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The field of economics as it relates to the activities of individual consumers, firms and organizations. Emphasis is on the application of economic principles and concepts to everyday decision making and to the analysis of current economic issues.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
  • AGRI 550 Sustained Tropical Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Contrast theory and practice in defining agricultural environmental "challenges" in the Neotropics. Indigenous and appropriate technological means of mitigation. Soil management and erosion, water scarcity, water over-abundance, and water quality. Explore agro-ecosystem protection via field trips and project designs. Institutional context of conservation strategies, NGO links, and public participation.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or equivalent; MATH 203 or AEMA 310 or equivalent
    • Restriction: Restricted Enrolment. Location in Panama. Student must be registered for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis and Applications (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A university-level introduction to demand and supply, consumer behaviour, production theory, market structures and income distribution theory.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Paul Dickinson, Naureen Fatema, Irakli Japaridze (Fall) Paul Dickinson (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ECON 230 or ECON 250
  • ECON 225 Economics of the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A study of the application of economic theory to questions of environmental policy. Particular attention will be given to the measurement and regulation of pollution, congestion and waste and other environmental aspects of specific economies.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Guillaume Lord (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 154-325 or 154-425
  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Holly Dressel (Fall)

    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 208 or permission of instructor.
  • GEOG 370 Protected Areas (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the goals of protected areas, focusing on the potential conflict between biodiversity conservation and use for recreation, education and sustainable extraction of resources. Principles and current issues in protected area design and management are reviewed. Examples are taken from developed and developing countries.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 208 or GEOG 203 or AEBI 205
  • GEOG 408 Geography of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Examines the geographical dimensions of development policy, specifically the relationships between the process of development and human-induced environmental change. Focuses on environmental sustainability, struggles over resource control, population and poverty, and levels of governance (the role of the state, non-governmental organizations, and local communities).

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 210 or GEOG 216 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 410 Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of the cultural, political, and economic mechanisms and manifestations of contemporary underdevelopment and the response to it from different regional and national peripheral societies within the dominant world economic system.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or permission of instructor

Field Courses

One of:

  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Angela Keane (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.
  • BIOL 331 Ecology/Behaviour Field Course (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Methods of sampling natural populations. Testing hypotheses in nature.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Martin J Lechowicz, Simon Reader, Rowan Barrett (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215
    • Note: Preregistration in March and April. See Course web page: http://biology.mcgill.ca/undergrad/C331A/index.htm. Meets 12-days just before the fall term, with a project report early in the fall term.
    • The field portion of this course is given at the University's Gault Nature Reserve in Mont St. Hilaire over a two-week period in August. In the fall, students prepare a report based on projects carried out during this field portion. This course has an additional fee of $557.84 which includes room and board and handouts. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity
  • BIOL 334 Applied Tropical Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Relevant to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and conservation of natural resources. Field component taught at the University's Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, for two weeks in early May. The course is organized in a series of small-group field projects of 2-3 days each. Interested students should contact the Undergraduate Office and fill out an application form.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Neil Price, Thomas E Bureau, Frederic Guichard (Winter)

    • Summer
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206; and BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202; and permission of the instructor.
    • This course, given in Barbados, has an additional fee of $1450 to cover the costs of room and board at Bellairs Research Institute, the course pack and all other expenses during the course. It does not cover tuition, airfare, flight insurance, airport taxes, meals in transit, or the cost of supplementary health insurance. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.
  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Eliseo Hector Barrios (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 24 hours lecture and 36 hours field work over a 4-week period
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203, and BIOL 215
    • Corequisites: ENVR 451; GEOG 404 and HIST 510 alternating with GEOG 498 and AGRI 550
    • Restriction: location in Panama. Students must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • GEOG 495 Field Studies - Physical Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Field research projects in physical geography. Held locally in Monteregian or Eastern Township regions. The course is organised around field projects designed to formulate and test scientific hypotheses in a physical geography discipline. May Summer session. Preregistration in Department required by March 28.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • 2-week field school
    • Prerequisites: 6 credits from the following list of Systematic Physical Geography courses: GEOG 305, GEOG 321, GEOG 322, GEOG 350, GEOG 372
    • A fee of $459.90 is charged to all students registered in GEOG 495. This course is held at the Gault Estate at Mont St.-Hilaire during May. The fee is used to support the cost of transportation, accommodations, local fees and all meals for approximately 12 nights.
    • Since this is a field course, the Victoria Day statutory holiday will not be taken into consideration. Therefore, students are expected to attend their lecture on Monday, May 19, 2014.
  • GEOG 499 Subarctic Field Studies (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to the geography of the subarctic with emphasis on the application of field methods in physical and/or human geography.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or GEOG 301
    • Instructor's approval required.
    • This fee of $1,887.43 is charged to all students registered in GEOG 499 Subarctic Field Studies. This course is held at Schefferville, Quebec in late August through early September. The fee is used to support the cost of transportation, accommodations, local fees and all meals. The department subsidizes a portion of the cost of this compulsory activity for each student registered in a Geography Major or Honours program.
  • WILD 475 Desert Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : This course deals with adaptations to heat and drought. Representative areas of Coastal Bend, Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts are visited over a two-week period. In the third week, emphasis is on the high desert and historical and cultural aspects of desert life observed in at the Mesa Verde cliff dwellings. A pre-trip analysis of an area to be visited and field notes are the principal bases of evaluation. Students must bear transportation costs.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: George McCourt (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Field course
    • Prerequisites: PLNT 460, WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307), WILD 420
    • Enrolment limited to 20
    • A $1,000.00 fee is charged to all students registered in WILD 475 Desert Ecology, a course that is based on site visits in the southwestern US, that include representative areas of the Chihuahuan (Texas), Sonoran (Arizona) and Mojave (California) Deserts. This fee is used to support the cost of transportation once in the USA, entrance fees and the operation of the support vehicle and crew. Students will be responsible for their own airfare and food expenses.

General Scientific Principles

6 credits of general scientific principles selected from the following:

* Note: You may take ENVB 430 or GEOG 306, but not both.

(A second field course from the domain curriculum may also be taken.)

** Note: You may take BIOL 432 or ENVB 315, but not both.

  • BIOL 324 Ecological Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course presents evolutionary genetics within an ecological context. The course covers theoretical topics together with relevant data from natural populations of plants and animals.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture, 1 hour seminar
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 202
  • BIOL 342 Contemporary Topics in Aquatic Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to freshwater and marine biology and ecology. Topics include structure and function of the major aquatic ecosystems and how these are affected by environmental change.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves, Neil Price (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite(s): BIOL 205, and BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 432.
  • BIOL 432 Limnology (3 credits) **

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and other inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gregor Fussmann, Irene Gregory-Eaves (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture; 2 weekends at field station equivalent to 3 hours laboratory per week
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.
    • This course, involving two field weekends, has an additional fee of $280, which includes room and board and transportation. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.
    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENVB 315.
  • BIOL 441 Biological Oceanography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to how the ocean functions biologically: biology and ecology of marine plankton; regulation, extent and fate of production in the sea.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Neil Price (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory/conference
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206; and BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202.
  • ENVB 313 Phylogeny and Biogeography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Phylogeny reconstruction; principles of systematics; predictive power of phylogenetic trees; theory and principles of biogeography; historical biogeography of plants and animals; role of abiotic and biotic factors in shaping distributions.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Terry A Wheeler, Marcia J Waterway (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisite: AEBI 212 or WILD 212
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 313
  • ENVB 315 Science of Inland Waters (3 credits) **

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Nature and history of limnology; divisions of inland waters; properties of fresh water; habitats; zones; nutrient cycles; biota; adaptations; seasonal variation; distributions; pollution; succession and evolution of fresh water environments. Includes field excursions.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 315.
  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410
    • This course has an additional charge of $15.39 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • ENVB 430 GIS for Natural Resource Management (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the presentation and analysis of ecological information, including sources and capture of spatial data; characterizing, transforming, displaying spatial data; and spatial analysis to solve resource management problems.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Jeffrey Cardille, Viacheslav Adamchuk (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: At least one environmental science course and one ecology course or permission of instructor
    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken GEOG 201, 306 or 307 or BREE/ABEN 430 or NRSC 430. Limited to 32 students.
  • ENVB 437 Assessing Environmental Impact (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Theories and procedures of assessing environmental impact. An examination of the environmental impact of existing programs and projects to examine their accuracy in predicting consequences and attenuating undesirable effects.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Gordon Hickey (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures
    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken WILD 437 or NRSC 437.
  • GEOG 272 Earth's Changing Surface (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the study of landforms as products of geomorphic and geologic systems acting at and near the Earth's surface. The process geomorphology approach will be used to demonstrate how landforms of different geomorphic settings represent a dynamic balance between forces acting in the environment and the physical properties of materials present.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 306 Raster Geo-Information Science (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Formal introduction to a computer-based Geographical Information System (GIS). Topics will focus on map analysis and on transforming and displaying spatial data. GIS will be used by students to solve problems in both physical and human geography.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours and laboratory
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 201
  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The earth-atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances. Surface-atmosphere exchange of energy, mass and momentum and related atmospheric processes on a local and regional scale. Introduction to measurement theory and practice in micrometeorology.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or ATOC 210 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Nigel Thomas Roulet, Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent
  • GEOG 350 Ecological Biogeography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The study of the patterns of distribution of organisms in space and time with emphasis on plant communities. Ecological, geographical, historical and anthropological factors affecting these distribution patterns will be discussed. Particular consideration is given to methods for description and classification of plant communities.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or ENVR 200 or ENVR 202
    • Note: Offered at Macdonald campus in alternate years.
  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have successfully completed NRSC 331
  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Frieda Beauregard (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $25.65 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • WILD 311 Ethology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Invertebrate and vertebrate behaviour; innate behaviour, learning, motivation, agonistic behaviour, rhythms, social organization, mating systems and communication.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures, one 3-hour lab
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ZOOL 311
  • WOOD 420 Environmental Issues: Forestry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Woodland Resources : The science behind current environmental issues relating to forests including the effects of management on productivity and biodiversity, conservation of old-growth forests and endangered species, pesticide use, and industrial pollution. The role of scientific knowledge, relative to social and economic forces, in forest resource decision-making is discussed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour tutorial
    • Prerequisites: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 and SOIL 210 or ENVB 210 or permission of instructor

Social Science:

One of:

* Note: If WILD 415 is taken, 1 additional credit of complementary courses must be taken.

  • AGEC 333 Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The role of resources in the environment, use of resources, and management of economic resources within the firm or organization. Problem-solving, case studies involving private and public decision-making in organizations are utilized.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Paul Thomassin (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent
  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Colin H Scott (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite: ANTH 204, or ANTH 206, or SOCI 328, or GEOG 300 or ENVR 201, or ENVR 203, or permission of instructor
  • ANTH 416 Environment/Development: Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Study of environmental effects of development in East Africa, especially due to changes in traditional land tenure and resource use across diverse ecosystems. Models, policies and cases of pastoralist, agricultural, fishing, wildlife and tourist development will be examined, across savanna, desert, forest, highland and coastal environments.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Open only to students in the Study in Africa program, a full-term field study program in East Africa
    • Prerequisite: One prior course in Anthropology, Geography or Environmental Studies
  • ECON 326 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic and structural aspects of the ecological crisis. A course in which subjects discussed include the conflict between economic growth and the laws of thermodynamics; the search for alternative economic indicators; the fossil fuels crisis; and "green'' fiscal policy.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Robin Thomas Naylor (Fall) Robin Thomas Naylor (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or consent of instructor
  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 498 Humans in Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on understanding of inter-relations between humans and neotropical environments represented in Panama. Study of contemporary rural landscapes, their origins, development and change. Impacts of economic growth and inequality, social organization, and politics on natural resource use and environmental degradation. Site visits and field exercises in peasant/colonist, Amerindian, and plantation communities.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 6 hours lecture for 4 weeks, 3 hours seminar, 2 hours laboratory, 8 hours conference
    • Restriction: Location in Panama. Student must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203 or equivalents
  • GEOG 510 Humid Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on the environmental and human spatial relationships in tropical rain forest and savanna landscapes. Human adaptation to variations within these landscapes through time and space. Biophysical constraints upon "development" in the modern era.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Oliver T Coomes (Winter)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent and written permission of the instructor
  • URBP 520 Globalization: Planning and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Economic and social issues related to planning for sustainable development, with a focus on water. Political and environmental determinants of resource use. Impact of global, regional and local institutions, programs and plans in Barbados and in the field locale in general.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Leroy E Phillip, Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (3-3-3)
    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.
  • WILD 415 Conservation Law (2 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : A study of the various federal, provincial and municipal laws affecting wildlife habitat. Topics include: laws to protect wild birds and animals; the regulation of hunting; legal protection of trees and flowers, sanctuaries, reserves, parks; techniques of acquiring and financing desirable land, property owner rights.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 2 lectures

Organisms and Diversity:

6 credits of organisms and diversity selected as follows:

* Note: You may take BIOL 350 or ENTO 350, but not both; you may take BIOL 540 or ENVR 540, but not both.

  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250
  • ANTH 311 Primate Behaviour and Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Critical evaluation of theories concerning primate behaviour with emphasis on the importance of ecological factors in framing behaviour, including mating behaviour, parent care, social structures, communication, as well as various forms of social interaction such as dominance, territoriality and aggressive expression.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Valérie Schoof (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisite: Any 200 level course in a social or biological science.
  • BIOL 335 Marine Mammals (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Biology of marine mammals with special emphasis on seals and whales of the Bay of Fundy. Taught at the Huntsman Marine Science Centre, St. Andrews, N.B., for two weeks in August. The course combines lectures, laboratory exercises, field trips, and individual projects. Apply first to Huntsman, then contact susan.gabe@mcgill.ca.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205
    • This course is offered in the summer.
  • BIOL 350 Insect Biology and Control (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to insect structure, physiology, biochemistry, development, systematics, evolution, ecology and control. Stress on interrelationships and integrated pest control.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or permission of instructor.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENTO 330 or ENTO 350.
    • Note: This course is also offered as ENTO 350 in the winter term.
  • BIOL 355 Trees: Ecology & Evolution (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Functional ecology and evolution of trees: patterns in the diversity of tree form and function, the nature of tree adaptation to environment from the scale of habitat to global biogeography.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 205 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 555.
  • BIOL 427 Herpetology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of biology as exemplified by amphibians and reptiles. Topics include: adaptation, social behaviour, reproductive strategies, physiology, biomechanics, ecology, biogeography and evolution. Laboratories will emphasize structure, systematics and identification of local and world herpetofauna as well as field methods.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 and BIOL 305 or permission of instructor.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 327.
  • BIOL 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to U1 or U2 students
    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken ENVR 540.
  • ENTO 350 Insect Biology and Control (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Introduction to insect structure, physiology, biochemistry, development, systematics, evolution, ecology and control. Stress on interrelationships and integrated pest control.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENTO 330 or BIOL 350
    • Note: Offered on the downtown campus. This course is also offered as BIOL 350 in the Fall term.
  • ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Modern concepts of integrated control techniques and principles of insect pest management, with emphasis on biological control (use of predators, parasites and pathogens against pest insects), population monitoring, and manipulation of environmental, behavioral and physiological factors in the pest's way of life. Physical, cultural, and genetic controls and an introduction to the use of non-toxic biochemical controls (attractants, repellents, pheromones, antimetabolites).

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have previously taken ENTO 452
    • 3 lectures
  • ENTO 440 Insect Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Ecology, evolution and systematics of insects and their relatives. Classification and phylogeny of selected insect families; use of diagnostic characters and taxonomic keys. Ecological interactions at an individual, population and community level with emphasis on diversity patterns in space and time.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Fall
    • Combined lecture/demonstration
    • Prerequisite: ENTO 330 or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ENTO 425
  • ENVR 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor.
    • Restrictions: Not open to U1 or U2 students. Not open to students who are taking or have taken BIOL 540.
  • PLNT 304 Biology of Fungi (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : This course describes the various groups of fungi and explores in depth their biology and physiology, their ecological niches and the role in various ecosystems and their benefits and uses in industry and biotechnology.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Suha Jabaji (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
  • PLNT 358 Flowering Plant Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Principles of classification and identification of flowering plants and ferns, with emphasis on 35 major families of flowering plants and the habitats in which they grow.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Marcia J Waterway (Fall)

    • 2 lectures, one 3-hour lab, plus a 4-day field week held the week preceding the start of classes
    • Prerequisite: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 or ENVR 202 or permission of instructor
    • A $51.30 fee is charged to all students registered in this course, which has a fieldwork component prior to the beginning of classes in August. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, a hand lens, instructional handouts and identification aids. Students who have already received a hand lens may request a reimbursement of a portion of this charge through their department.
  • WILD 307 Natural History of Vertebrates (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : The diversity and natural history of Canadian vertebrates illustrated with trophic, phylogenetic, and macroecological approaches.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Lectures and modules
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ZOOL 307
    • This course carries an additional charge of $15.39 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • WILD 350 Mammalogy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : This course focuses on the evolution, classification, ecology and behaviour of mammals and relations between humans and mammals. Also structure, systematics and identification of local and world mammals, as well as field methods will be emphasized.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisites: AEBI 211 or WILD 200 (formerly AEBI 200), and WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307)
    • A fee of $15 is charged to all students registered in WILD 350, Mammalogy, a course that has a required field trip. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions and equipment associated with local field trips. The fee is only refundable prior to the deadline to withdraw with full refund.”
  • WILD 420 Ornithology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Taxonomic relationships and evolution of birds are outlined. Reproduction, migration and population processes of North American birds are examined.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Marie Perkins (Fall)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and occasional field trips
    • Prerequisite: WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307) or permission of instructor
    • This course is scheduled for video-conferencing.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $15.39 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • WILD 424 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Systematics, morphology, biology and ecology of parasitic protozoa, flatworms, roundworms and arthropods with emphasis on economically and medically important species.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Petra Rohrbach (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 424 (formerly ZOOL 424).
Faculty of Science—2014-2015 (last updated Feb. 18, 2014) (disclaimer)