Biomedical Engineering

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Biomedical Engineering

Location

Location

  • Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street, Room 316
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada

About Biomedical Engineering

About Biomedical Engineering

The Department offers graduate training programs leading to master's (M.Eng.) and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

We provide instruction and opportunities for interdisciplinary research in the application of engineering, mathematics, and the physical sciences to problems in medicine and the life sciences. Courses are offered for graduate students in the life sciences, engineering, and the physical sciences.

Excellent laboratory facilities for basic and applied research are available in the Department and in the laboratories of associated staff located elsewhere on campus. The Department operates a network of high-performance workstations and well-equipped mechanical and electronics workshops.

Basic research in the Department concentrates on the application of quantitative engineering analysis methods to basic biomedical research problems. Currently active areas of research include: neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. Staff members are also active in more applied research related to the development of quantitative analysis tools and instruments for biomedical research. Areas of activity here include: signal analysis, system identification, modelling, simulation and parameter estimation, image processing, pattern recognition, ultrasound, and biorobotics. A new option in bioinformatics is offered jointly with other University departments.

Graduate students may also be registered through the departments of Medicine, Science, and Engineering, and must then fulfil the requirements for advanced degrees imposed by their respective departments.

In addition, all students are required, through coursework and independent study, to achieve a degree of interdisciplinary competence appropriate to their area of specialization.

M.Eng. Meetings: 1) Initial; 2) Progress; and Fast-Track transfer to the Ph.D. program. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Ph.D. Meetings: 1) Preliminary; 2) Comprehensive Exam Preparation; 3) Thesis Proposal and Comprehensive Exam; 4) Thesis Progress; and 5) Thesis Pre-submission. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME's internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields, and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (M.Eng.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine with a strong emphasis on mathematics, physics, chemistry, and basic physiology, or cell biology. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train M.Eng. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (Ph.D.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine and a master's degree in biomedical engineering, bioengineering, biotechnology, electrical engineering, physiology, chemical engineering, biomaterial, system engineering, imaging, or other related areas. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train Ph.D. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field, and will be capable of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
—2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014) (disclaimer)

Biomedical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Biomedical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please address enquiries directly to the Department.

Application Deadlines

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by Biomedical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
—2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014) (disclaimer)

Biomedical Engineering Faculty

Biomedical Engineering Faculty

Chair
R.E. Kearney
Emeritus Professor
T.M.S. Chang; B.Sc., M.D.,C.M., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.C.P.(C), F.R.S.(C) (joint appt. with Physiology)
Professors
D.L. Collins; B.Sc., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appt. with Neurology and Neurosurgery)
A.C. Evans; B.Sc.(Liv.), M.Sc.(Sur.), Ph.D.(Leeds) (joint appt. with Neurology and Neurosurgery)
H.L. Galiana; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
R.E. Kearney; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
S. Prakash; B.Sc.(Hon.), M.Sc., M.Tech.(BHU), Ph.D.(McG.)
M. Tabrizian; B.Sc.(Iran), M.Sc., Ph.D.(PMC-France), M.B.A.(HEC) (joint appt. with Dentistry)
Associate Professors
W.R.J. Funnell; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appt. with Otolaryngology)
D. Juncker; Dipl., Ph.D.(Neuch-Switzerland)
J.L. Nadeau; B.A., Ph.D.(Minn.)
Associate Members
S. Baillet (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
C. Baker (Ophthalmology)
F. Barthelat (Mechanical Engineering)
K. Cullen (Physiology)
A. Ehrlicher (Bioengineering)
I. El Naqa (Oncology)
J. Gotman (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
D. Guitton (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
A. Hendricks (Bioengineering)
A. Kamen (Bioengineering)
A. Katsarkas (Otolaryngology)
J. Kinsella (Bioengineering)
A.M. Lauzon (Medicine)
R. Leask (Chemical Engineering)
T. Milner (Kinesiology and Physical Education)
G. Mitsis (Bioengineering)
L. Mongeau (Mechanical Engineering)
R. Mongrain (Mechanical Engineering)
J. Near (Psychiatry)
D. Nicolau (Bioengineering)
D. Pasini (Mechanical Engineering)
A. Reader (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
A. Shmuel (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
Y.B. Xia (Bioengineering)
Adjunct Professors
P.G. Charette (Sher.)
C. Grova (C'dia)
E. Jones (KU Leuven)
J.-M. Lina (ETS)
G.B. Pike (Calg.)
T. Veres (NRC)
—2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014) (disclaimer)

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Thesis Courses (24 credits)

BMDE 693 (6) Thesis Research 4
BMDE 694 (6) Thesis Research 5
BMDE 695 (12) Thesis Submission

Required Courses (3 credits)

COMP 616D1 (1.5) Bioinformatics Seminar
COMP 616D2 (1.5) Bioinformatics Seminar

Complementary Courses (18 credits)

12 credits of courses which have both biomedical content and content from the physical sciences, engineering, or computer science selected from the following:

BIOT 505 (3) Selected Topics in Biotechnology
BMDE 501 (3) Selected Topics in Biomedical Engineering
BMDE 502 (3) BME Modelling and Identification
BMDE 503 (3) Biomedical Instrumentation
BMDE 504 (3) Biomaterials and Bioperformance
BMDE 505 (3) Cell and Tissue Engineering
BMDE 506 (3) Molecular Biology Techniques
BMDE 508 (3) Introduction to Micro and Nano-Bioengineering
BMDE 519 (3) Biomedical Signals and Systems
BMDE 600D1 (1.5) Seminars in Biomedical Engineering
BMDE 600D2 (1.5) Seminars in Biomedical Engineering
BMDE 650 (3) Advanced Medical Imaging
BMDE 651 (3) Orthopaedic Engineering
COMP 526 (3) Probabilistic Reasoning and AI
COMP 546 (4) Computational Perception
COMP 558 (3) Fundamentals of Computer Vision
COMP 761 (4) Advanced Topics Theory 2
ECSE 523 (3) Speech Communications
ECSE 526 (3) Artificial Intelligence
ECSE 529 (3) Computer and Biological Vision
ECSE 626 (4) Statistical Computer Vision
ECSE 681 (4) Colloquium in Electrical Engineering
EXMD 610 (3) Molecular Methods in Medical Research
MDPH 607 (3) Introduction to Medical Imaging
MDPH 611 (2) Medical Electronics
MDPH 612 (2) Computers in Medical Imaging
MECH 500 (3) Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering
MECH 561 (3) Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Systems
PHGY 517 (3) Artificial Internal Organs
PHGY 518 (3) Artificial Cells

6 credits selected from the following courses:

BINF 621 (3) Bioinformatics: Molecular Biology
BMDE 652 (3) Bioinformatics: Proteomics
BTEC 555 (3) Structural Bioinformatics
COMP 618 (3) Bioinformatics: Functional Genomics
PHGY 603 (3) Systems Biology and Biophysics

In addition, students are required to present their work as a conference paper or departmental seminar before being granted the M.Eng. (Bioinformatics Option) degree.

—2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014) (disclaimer)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics

** This program/concentration is no longer available. **

For more information, see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics .

Faculty of Medicine—2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014) (disclaimer)