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Honours Global Food Security (54 credits)

Offered by: Plant Science     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

Program Director: Professor Humberto Monardes

Students can use their electives to complete the Honours program. The courses credited to the Honours program must be in addition to any required or complementary courses taken to satisfy the requirements of the student's Major and Specialization.

In addition to satisfying the Honours requirements, students must apply for the Honours program in March or April of their U2 year. It is the responsibility of the student to find a professor who is willing to support and supervise the research project. No student will be accepted into the program until a supervisor has agreed to supervise the student. Applicants must have a minimum CGPA of 3.3 to enter the Honours program and they must earn a B grade (3.0) or higher in the courses making up the Honours program. Students are required to achieve a minimum overall CGPA of 3.3 at graduation to obtain honours. Students can use their electives to complete the Honours program. The courses credited to the Honours program must be in addition to any required or complementary courses taken to satisfy the requirements of the student's major and specialization.

The Honours program consists of 12 credits of courses that follow one of two plans listed below.

Students who meet all the requirements will have the name of their program changed to include the word "Honours."
A brief description of the Honours project activities involved will be documented and signed by the Program Director of the student's Major, the supervisor of the Honours project, and the student.

The program provides a global perspective on agriculture and food security, and addresses issues related to rural development, malnutrition, poverty and food safety with special emphasis on the developing world. Using a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach, the program provides students with a comprehensive set of courses at McGill in combination with hands-on experience through structured internships and study abroad opportunities. The field experience (short courses, internships, or full semester) includes project development in local communities, observing subsistence agriculture in situ, and participating in various activities which sensitize students to the challenges that countries face to feed their people. Students will have the opportunity to develop the knowledge base needed for successful careers in government, non-government, and international institutions in the areas of international and sustainable development, international research and project management, agri-business, and food and agriculture policy analysis.

Program Prerequisites

Refer to "Faculty Information and Regulations" > "Minimum Credit Requirements" in this eCalendar for prerequisites and minimum credit requirements.

Required Courses (33 credits)

  • AEBI 210 Organisms 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The biology of plants and plant-based systems in managed and natural terrestrial environments. The interactions between autotrophs and soil organisms and selected groups of animals with close ecological and evolutionary connections with plants (e.g., herbivores and pollinators) will be explored in lecture and laboratory.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Jacqueline Bede, Kushalappa Ajjamada, Danielle J Donnelly (Fall)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken PLNT 201 or PLNT 211
    • 2 hour lecture and 3 hour lab
  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The field of economics as it relates to the activities of individual consumers, firms and organizations. Emphasis is on the application of economic principles and concepts to everyday decision making and to the analysis of current economic issues.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
  • AGEC 442 Economics of International Agricultural Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The course deals with economic aspects of international development with emphasis on the role of food, agriculture and the resource sector in the economy of developing countries. Topics will include world food analysis, development project analysis and policies for sustainable development. Development case studies will be used.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or AGEC 201 or equivalent
  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Two 2-hour conferences
  • AGRI 493 International Project Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Principles and practice related to management of agriculture, nutrition and environmental projects within an international context. Case-studies and workshops drawing on expertise of development professionals from government and the private sector address techniques and resources for successful planning, implementation and evaluation within a multi-sectoral framework.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

  • ANSC 250 Principles of Animal Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Introduction to the scientific principles underlying the livestock and poultry industries. Emphasis will be placed on the breeding, physiology and nutrition of animals raised for the production of food and fibre.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Kevin Wade (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • ENVB 210 The Biophysical Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : With reference to the ecosystems in the St Lawrence lowlands, the principles and processes governing climate-landform-water-soil-vegetation systems and their interactions will be examined in lecture and laboratory. Emphasis on the natural environment as an integrated system.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 210
  • INTD 200 Introduction to International Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Inst for the St of Development (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    International Development : An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of International Development Studies focusing on the theory and practice of development. It examines various approaches to international development, including past and present relationships between developed and underdeveloped societies, and pays particular attention to power and resource distribution globally and within nations.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Kazue Takamura, Rachel Kiddell-Monroe (Fall)

  • NUTR 207 Nutrition and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Provides students who have a basic biology/chemistry background with the fundamental information on how macronutrients, vitamins and minerals are metabolized in the body, followed by application to evaluate current issues of maximizing health and disease prevention at different stages of the lifecycle.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Linda J Wykes (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
    • Corequisites: AEBI 202 or CEGEP Objective 00XU or FDSC 230 or CEGEP Objective 00XV
    • Restriction: Not open to students who take NUTR 200 or EDKP 292
    • Restriction: Science students in physical science and psychology programs who wish to take this course should see the Arts and Science Student Affairs Office for permission to register.
  • NUTR 341 Global Food Security (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Food insecurity is one of the most critical issues humanity has faced in history. The magnitude of this phenomenon, reflected in its worldwide presence and in the number of individuals affected, makes it an imperative component of all nations' and of all internaltional agencies' agendas. Its complexity of determinants and its numerous consequences require the involvement of multipe disciplines and sectors. McGill undergraduate students as future professionals tackling global issues require an integrated and multidisciplinary training on food security.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: NUTR207 or permission of Instructor

Complementary Courses (21 credits)

9 credits from the following:

  • AGRI 215 Agro-Ecosystems Field Course (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Through case studies and field trips, students will examine the problems and constraints within the Canadian agro-ecosystem, including the interrelationships among food production, the environment, agricultural policy and social issues. Research in this field of study will also be introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg, Roger I Cue (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 215.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $51.30 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips to agricultural enterprises. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250
  • AGRI 499 Agricultural Development Internship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Supervised internship to provide practical experience working on agricultural issues related to international development. The internship can take many forms, including work in a developing country, for an agency that focuses on international development, or on a research project that aims at solving problems faced by developing populations.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Julie Major (Fall) Julie Major (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
    • Students should take this course after having completed four semesters in their undergraduate program. It is the student's responsibility to find an appropriate internship, which must be approved by the instructor before registration is authorized.
  • ANSC 420 Animal Biotechnology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Applications of animal biotechnology in agriculture, biomedicine and environmental preservation, including culture, manipulation and transformation of somatic cells, isolation of stem cells, reproductive biotechnologies, animal cloning by nuclear transplantation, production of transgenic animals, and cell and gene therapies.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Vilceu Bordignon (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: AEBI 202 or LSCI 202 and MICR 230 or LSCI 230
  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Shiv Prasher (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2-hour lab
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.
    • Note: This course carries an additional course charge of $30 to cover transportation costs for two field trips, which may include a visit to a national weather station and a trip to gain hands-on experience on monitoring water flow in streams.
  • FDSC 310 Post Harvest Fruit and Vegetable Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Food Science & Agr-Chemistry (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Food Science : The post harvest chemistry and physiology of horticultural crops as they affect quality and marketability, handling methods pre and post harvest, principles and practices in cooling, storage, transportation and packaging.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Hosahalli Ramaswamy (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • This course carries an additional charge of $46.17 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • NRSC 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Introduction to physical and social environments as factors contributing to the production of human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken GEOG 221.
    • Note: This course is also offered as GEOG 221. Students enrolled in main campus programs register as GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register as NRSC 221.
  • NUTR 501 Nutrition in Developing Countries (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : This course will cover the major nutritional problems in developing countries. The focus will be on nutrition and health and emphasize young children and other vulnerable groups. The role of diet and disease for each major nutritional problem will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Grace Marquis (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 lectures and one seminar
    • Prerequisite: For undergraduate students, consent of instructor required
  • PLNT 300 Cropping Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Application of plant science and soil science to production of agronomic and horticultural crops. Use and sustainability of fertilization, weed control, crop rotation, tillage, drainage and irrigation practices.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Alan K Watson (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: AEBI 210
  • PLNT 435 Plant Breeding (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Principles and practices of plant breeding, including reproduction of crop plants; plant hybridization; sources of genetic variation; selection methods used for self- and cross-pollinated crops and for clonally reproduced crops; breeding for diseases and pest resistance; applications of biotechnology in plant breeding.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Prerequisites: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 and CELL 204 or LSCI 204
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 535.
  • SOIL 315 Soil Nutrient Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Plant nutrients in the soil, influence of soil properties on nutrient absorption and plant growth, use of organic and inorganic fertilizers.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Joann Karen Whalen (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one lab
    • Prerequisites: ENVB 210 or permission of instructor
  • SOIL 326 Soils in a Changing Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Soil processes responsible for soil formation will be studied and the impact of changes to the physical and chemical environment will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Asim Biswas (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: A previous course in soil science, geography, geology or permission of instructor.

Honours Courses

12 credits of Honours Plan A or Plan B:

Honours Plan A

Two 6-credit Honours research courses in the subject area of the student's major, chosen in consultation with the Program Director of the student's major and the professor who has agreed to supervise the research project.

  • FAES 401 Honours Research Project 1 (6 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Faculty of Agric & Envir Sci : Students will prepare a Literature Review, Progress Report and deliver a Proposal Seminar as well as begin work on the research project. Completion of the project will take place in FAES 402, Honours Research Project 2.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll, Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
    • Restrictions: This course is intended for senior undergraduate students (U3) in the final year of their Honours program.
  • FAES 402 Honours Research Project 2 (6 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Faculty of Agric & Envir Sci : Honours Research Project 2 is the completion of the project begun in FAES 401 and requires a Progress Report, a Final Project Report and a Project Presentation.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll, Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: FAES 401 and permission of instructor
    • Restrictions: This course is intended for senior undergraduate students (U3) in the final year of their Honours program.

OR

Honours Plan B

A minimum of two 3-credit Honours courses and 6 credits in 400- or 500-level courses, from the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, selected in consultation with the Program Director of the student's major. The topic of the Honours research project must be on a topic related to their major and selected in consultation with the Program Director of the student's major and the professor who has agreed to supervise the research project.

  • FAES 405 Honours Project 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Faculty of Agric & Envir Sci : Students will prepare a Literature Review, Progress Report and deliver a Proposal Seminar as well as begin work on the research project. Completion of the project will take place in FAES 406, Honours Project 2.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes, John C Henning (Fall) Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes, John C Henning (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
    • Restrictions: This course is intended for senior undergraduate students (U3) in the final year of their Honours program.
  • FAES 406 Honours Project 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Faculty of Agric & Envir Sci : Honours Project 2 is the completion of the project begun in FAES 405 and requires a Progress Report, a Final Project Report and a Project Presentation.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes, John C Henning (Fall) Roger I Cue, Humberto Monardes, John C Henning (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: FAES 405 and permission of instructor
    • Restrictions: This course is intended for senior undergraduate students (U3) in the final year of their Honours program.

Specialization (24 credits)

Students must also complete at least one Specialization of 24 credits.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2014-2015 (last updated Feb. 18, 2014) (disclaimer)