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Department of Chemical Engineering

Department of Chemical Engineering

Location

Location

  • M.H. Wong Building, Room 3060
  • 3610 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C5

About the Department of Chemical Engineering

About the Department of Chemical Engineering

The central purpose of engineering is to pursue solutions to technological problems in order to satisfy the needs and desires of society. Chemical engineers are trained to solve the kinds of problems that are typically found in the “chemical process industries,” which include the chemical manufacturing, plastics, water treatment, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, ceramics, and paint industries, as well as substantial portions of the food processing, textile, nuclear energy, alternative energy, biochemical, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. The technological problems and opportunities in these industries are often closely linked to social, economic, and environmental concerns. For this reason, chemical engineers often deal with these questions while working in management, pollution abatement, product development, marketing, and equipment design.

By means of complementary courses, students can also obtain further depth in technical areas and breadth in non-technical subjects. Some students elect to complete a minor in biotechnology, management, materials engineering, computer science, environmental engineering, chemistry, or another minor (see Minor Programs for minors available to engineering students).

The solution to many environmental problems requires an understanding of technological principles; a Chemical Engineering degree provides an ideal background. In addition to relevant material learned in the core program, a selection of environmental complementary courses and minor programs is available. The involvement of many Chemical Engineering faculty members in environmental research provides the opportunity for undergraduate students to carry out research projects in this area.

The curriculum also provides the preparation necessary to undertake postgraduate studies leading to the M.Eng. or Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering. Students completing this curriculum acquire a broad, balanced education in the natural sciences with the accent on application. Thus, for those who do not continue in Chemical Engineering, it provides an exceptionally balanced education in applied science. For others, it will form the basis of an educational program that may continue with a variety of studies such as business administration, medicine, or law. Versatility is, therefore, one of the most valuable characteristics of Chemical Engineering program graduates.

Academic Program

Academic Program

The Chemical Engineering program comprises 142 credits (116 credits for those who completed the Quebec CEGEP program in Pure and Applied Sciences). Certain students who take advantage of Summer session courses can complete the program in three calendar years.

In some cases, students from university science disciplines have sufficient credits to complete the requirements for the B.Eng. (Chemical) program in two and a half years. Those concerned should discuss this with their adviser.

Students must obtain a grade of C or better in all core courses. For the Department of Chemical Engineering, core courses include all required courses (departmental and non-departmental) as well as technical complementary courses.

Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering

Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering

The Chemical Engineering Student Society has for many years been affiliated both with the CSChE (Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering) and with the AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers). For a nominal fee, students receive Canadian Chemical News, a monthly publication, and the AlChE Student Members Bulletin, as well as other privileges of student membership in the two societies. The student chapter also organizes a series of local social, educational, and sporting events. Recent events have included student-professor banquets and Christmas parties, dances, speakers, broomball games, and joint meetings with the Montreal Section of the CSChE which gives students a chance to mix with practising chemical engineers.

Department of Chemical Engineering Faculty

Department of Chemical Engineering Faculty

Chair
Sylvain Coulombe
Emeritus Professors
David G. Cooper; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
John M. Dealy; B.S.(Kansas), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.), Eng.
Musa R. Kamal; B.S.(Ill.), M.S., Ph.D.(Carn. Mell), Eng.
Richard J. Munz; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Juan H. Vera; B.Mat.(Chile), Ing.Quim.(U.T.E.), M.S.(Calif., Berk.), Dr.Ing.(Santa Maria), Eng.
Professor
Sylvain Coulombe; B.Sc., M.Sc.A.(Sher.), Ph.D.(McG.), ing.
Sasha Omanovic; Dipl.Ing., Ph.D.(Zagreb), P.Eng
Alejandro D. Rey; B.Ch.Eng.(CCNY), Ph.D.(Calif., Berk.) (James McGill Professor)
Associate Professors
Dimitrios Berk; B.Sc.(Bosphorus), M.E.Sc.(W. Ont.), Ph.D.(Calg.), P.Eng.
Reghan James Hill; B.Eng.(Auck.), Ph.D.(Cornell)
Richard L. Leask; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Tor.), P.Eng.
Milan Maric; B.Sc., B.Eng. & Mgmt.(McM.), Ph.D.(Minn.), P.Eng.
Jean-Luc Meunier; Dipl.Ing., EPFL(Lausanne), M.Sc., Ph.D., INRS(Varennes), ing.
Phillip Servio; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Nathalie Tufenkji; B.Eng.(McG.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Yale)
Viviane Yargeau; B.Eng., M.Sc.A., Ph.D.(Sher.), ing.
Assistant Professors
P.-Luc Girard-Lauriault; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(École Poly., Montr.)
Jeff Gostick; B.Eng.(Ryerson), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Wat.), P.Eng.
Corinne Hoesli; B.Sc., B.A.Sc.(Ott.), Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Anne-Marie Kietzig; B.Eng.(T.U. Berlin), Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Jan Kopyscinski; Dipl.Ing., M.Sc.(BTU Germ.), Ph.D.(ETH Zurich)
Christopher Moraes; B.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Post-Retirement
W.J. Murray Douglas; B.Sc.(Qu.), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.)

Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.) - Chemical Engineering (142 credits)

Program credit weight: 142-145 credits Program credit weight for Quebec CEGEP students: 116 credits Program credit weight for out-of-province students: 142 credits The discipline of chemical engineering is distinctive in being based equally on physics, mathematics, and chemistry. Application of these three fundamental sciences is basic to a quantitative ...

For more information, see Chemical Engineering (142 credits).

More about the B.Eng. Degree in Chemical Engineering

More about the B.Eng. Degree in Chemical Engineering

Courses CHEE 582 and CHEE 584 comprise a Polymeric Materials sequence. Additional courses in this area are available in the Chemistry Department (e.g., CHEM 574) or at the graduate level (CHEE 681). The Department has considerable expertise in the polymer area.

Courses CHEE 370 and CHEE 474 make up a sequence in Biochemical Engineering-Biotechnology. Students interested in this area may take additional courses, particularly those offered by the Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry; Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; and courses in biochemistry and microbiology. The food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries are large industries in the Montreal area, and these courses are relevant to these industries and to the new high-technology applications of biotechnology.

The third area in which there is a sequence of courses is Pollution Control. The Department offers three courses in this area: CHEE 591, CHEE 592, and CHEE 593. As some water pollution control problems are solved by microbial processes, course CHEE 474 is also relevant to the pollution control area. Additional courses in this area are listed in the Environmental Engineering Minor.

A Minor in Biotechnology is also offered by the Faculties of Engineering and Science with emphasis on molecular biology and chemical engineering processes. A full description of the program appears in the Biotechnology Minor.

Note that many of the technical complementaries are offered only in alternate years. Students should, therefore, plan their complementaries as far ahead as possible. With the approval of the instructor and Academic Adviser, students may take graduate (500-level) CHEE courses as technical complementaries.

Faculty of Engineering—2014-2015 (last updated Mar. 4, 2014) (disclaimer)