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Secondary Social Sciences - History and Citizenship, Geography (120 credits)

Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed     Degree: Bachelor of Education

Program Requirements

Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) - Secondary Social Sciences - History and Citizenship, Geography program requires 120 credits and leads to teacher certification. Students who have not completed Quebec CEGEP, French Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, or at least one year of university studies prior to commencing the B.Ed. must also complete a minimum of 30 credits of Freshman courses (in addition to the 120 credits for the program) for a total of 150 credits.

The aim of the B.Ed. Secondary Education Program is to prepare strong beginning teachers for the secondary school level. This integrated program consists of courses in Education (including field experiences) and courses in the subject area of the teaching specialization. Students also take 6 credits of free electives. For all teacher education programs, course sequencing is highly structured. For this reason, the advising information in this eCalendar section must be used in conjunction with the summary companion document (Program Overview) found at http://www.mcgill.ca/dise/progs/secsocsci.

The Secondary Social Sciences - History and Citizenship, Geography program provides students with the learning opportunities needed to become proficient Social Science teachers with a strong knowledge base in History and Geography.

Please note that graduates of teacher education programs are recommended by the University for Quebec certification to the Quebec Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS). For more information about teacher certification in Quebec, please refer to the Faculty of Education section under "Overview of Faculty Programs," "Undergraduate Education Programs," and "Quebec Teacher Certification."

Freshman Program

Students normally complete 30 credits in their Freshman (U0) year.

The Freshman year is the time to take introductory-level courses in a teachable subject area, as well as to explore areas that are not normally taken within B.Ed. programs (e.g., Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, etc.). Students should also investigate the possibility of taking one of the First Year Seminar courses offered by the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science.

In addition, in consultation with the Program Adviser, students may select courses from the recommended course list below or other courses. The list includes History, Geography, and Religious Studies courses that may be used toward the academic component of the Secondary Social Sciences course requirements. Also included are several French Second Language (FRSL) courses for which placement tests are required to determine the appropriate level.

  • CEAP 250 Research Essay & Rhetoric (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill Writing Centre (School of Continuing Studies)

    Administered by: Centre for Continuing Education

    Overview

    CEAP : Principles and use of academic research and genres, rhetorical strategies, and general editing skills.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sarah Wolfson, Noreen Jane Bider, Julian Menezes (Fall) Susan Patricia Laver (Winter)

    • 3 hours
    • Formerly EAPR 250.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CESL 500 or ESLN 500 or EAPR 250 or EFRL 250.
    • Intended for native speakers of English.
    • Open only to students in degree programs - all years and faculties.
    • Entrance test: Short essay first day of classes.
  • EDEM 220 Contemporary Issues in Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Admin & Policy Studies in Ed : An introduction to contemporary issues in education in local, national and international contexts, including a critical perspective on educational issues by drawing on a variety of analytical frameworks.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Lisa Trimble (Fall)

  • FRSL 101 Beginners French 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : A comprehensive introduction to basic vocabulary, grammatical structures and speech patterns of written and oral French for students in any degree program having no previous knowledge of French. Learning to communicate at a functional level in a French-speaking environment. Short essays, cultural readings, mandatory lab practice.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Suzanne Pellerin, Sarah Anthony, Viviane Kwan-Lock, Marie-Claude Labbe, Jean-Francois Groulx, Alida Soucé (Fall)

    • Language laboratory and oral practice with a French monitor if available.
    • Placement test. No knowledge of French.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken FRSL 101D1/D2, FRSL 103, FRSL 104, or FRSL 105.
  • FRSL 102 Beginners French 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : A comprehensive introduction to basic vocabulary, grammatical structures and speech patterns of written and oral French for students in any degree program having no previous knowledge of French. Learning to communicate at a functional level in a French-speaking environment. Short essays, cultural readings, mandatory lab practice.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Suzanne Pellerin, Viviane Kwan-Lock, Jean-Francois Groulx, Alida Soucé (Winter)

    • Language laboratory and oral practice with a French monitor if available.
    • Prerequisite: FRSL 101
  • FRSL 207D1 Elementary French 01 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : Review and further training in basic structures, with emphasis on oral expression and listening comprehension. Awareness of French culture developed through audio-visual material and selected readings.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Chantal Creck, Natallia Liakina, Christine Petcoff, Marie-Josee Fortin, Marie-Hélène Tétreault (Fall)

    • 3 hours, plus language laboratory
    • Prerequisite: Placement test
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken Grade 12 or 13 French in Canada, or equivalent
    • Students must register for both FRSL 207D1 and FRSL 207D2.
    • No credit will be given for this course unless both FRSL 207D1 and FRSL 207D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms
    • FRSL 207D1 and FRSL 207D2 together are equivalent to FRSL 207
  • FRSL 207D2 Elementary French 01 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : See FRSL 207D1 for course description.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Natallia Liakina, Chantal Creck, Marie-Josee Fortin, Marie-Hélène Tétreault (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: FRSL 207D1
    • No credit will be given for this course unless both FRSL 207D1 and FRSL 207D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms
    • FRSL 207D1 and FRSL 207D2 together are equivalent to FRSL 207
  • FRSL 211D1 Oral and Written French 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : Language lab attendance required. Grammar review, comprehension, vocabulary development, selected readings and group discussions.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Loretta Hyrat, Sandra Miller Sanchez, Jean-Francois Groulx, Roch Deslauriers, Jean-Yves Richard (Fall)

    • 3 hours, plus language laboratory
    • Prerequisite: Placement test. Open to students in any degree program having an elementary knowledge of French and to those who have completed FRSL 207
    • Restriction: Not open to students from Québec
    • Students must register for both FRSL 211D1 and FRSL 211D2.
    • No credit will be given for this course unless both FRSL 211D1 and FRSL 211D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms
    • FRSL 211D1 and FRSL 211D2 together are equivalent to FRSL 211
  • FRSL 211D2 Oral and Written French 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    French as a Second Language : See FRSL 211D1 for course description.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Loretta Hyrat, Sandra Miller Sanchez, Jean-Francois Groulx, Dalila Boukacem (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: FRSL 211D1
    • No credit will be given for this course unless both FRSL 211D1 and FRSL 211D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms
    • FRSL 211D1 and FRSL 211D2 together are equivalent to FRSL 211
  • GEOG 200 Geographical Perspectives: World Environmental Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to geography as the study of nature and human beings in a spatial context. An integrated approach to environmental systems and the human organization of them from the viewpoint of spatial relationships and processes. Special attention to environmental problems as a constraint upon Third World development.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: James Ford (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present and Future (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of global change, from the Quaternary Period to the present day involving changes in the physical geography of specific areas. Issues such as climatic change and land degradation will be discussed, with speculations on future environments.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Gail L Chmura (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Jon Unruh, Brian Robinson (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • HIST 202 Survey: Canada to 1867 (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A survey of early Canada, from periods known mainly through archaeological records to the Confederation era. Social, cultural, economic and political themes will be examined.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Elsbeth Anne Heaman (Fall)

    • Fall
  • HIST 203 Survey: Canada since 1867 (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A survey of the development of Canada from Confederation to the present day. Social, economic and political history will be examined in a general way.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: David John Wright (Winter)

  • HIST 214 Introduction to European History (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Covers European History from the decline of the Roman Empire to the seventeenth century. The objective of the course is to provide students with both a knowledge of the major developments in pre-modern history and experience in the reading, interpretation and writing of history.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Nicholas Dew (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 101-215D
  • HIST 215 Modern European History (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A social, economic, political and cultural survey of European History from the early seventeenth century to the present.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Anastassios Anastassiadis, Judith Szapor (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 101-215D
  • RELG 204 Judaism, Christianity and Islam (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : An introduction to the beliefs, practices, and religious institutions of these three world religions.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Meredith Warren, Patricia Kirkpatrick, Armando Salvatore (Winter)

    • Winter
  • RELG 207 The Study of World Religions 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : An introduction to the study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Primal Religions.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Arvind Sharma (Fall)

    • Winter
  • RELG 252 Hinduism and Buddhism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : The interaction of Hinduism and Buddhism in India with special reference to the law of Karma, caste, women, ritual, death, yoga, and liberation. Determination of interpretative principles for understanding the religious psychology of Hindus and Buddhists.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Lara E Braitstein, Andrea Marion Pinkney (Fall)

    • Fall

Required Courses (54 credits)

  • EDEC 201 First Year Professional Seminar (1 credit)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Orientation to the culture and community of school and to teaching as a profession. Focus on the general functioning of schools and complexity of the teacher role. Competencies and working professional portfolios will be addressed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Ginette Clarke, Constance Buki, Sheryl Smith-Gilman, Enzo Di Ioia, Deborah A G Heuff-Munro, Suzan Fournier, Donald Houston (Fall)

    • Corequisite: EDFE 200
    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. Secondary and B.Ed. K/Elem. students only
  • EDEC 215 English Exam for Teacher Certification

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : This English Exam for Teacher Certification is a MELS requirement for teaching in the Quebec English school system. Consists of a 2-hour exam designed to assess teacher candidates' competency in the language of instruction. Must be completed before the 3rd Field Experience. Students are permitted four attempts to pass. Students who do not pass after four attempts must withdraw from the teacher preparation program.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Mariusz Galczynski (Fall)

  • EDEC 247 Policy Issues in Quebec Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : This course examines the organization of education in Quebec from various perspectives, including historical, political, social and legal. It aims to provide students with sufficient knowledge that they can begin the life-long learning process of a professional educator, aware of, and contributing to, the policy talk on school.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Tino Bordonaro (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EDEM 405.
  • EDEC 254 Second Professional Seminar (Secondary) (1 credit)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Preparation for the second field experience through development of basic practices in planning and teaching in secondary school classrooms. Competencies and professional portfolio will be addressed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Corequisite: EDFE 254 or EDFE 254D1
    • Restrictions: Open to B.Ed. Sec and concurrent B.Sc. and B.Ed. students.
  • EDEC 262 Media, Technology and Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Orientation to the equipment and systems of educational technology. Examination of theories of educational technology, media education and technology education and the exploration and development of possible applications in school settings.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Lisa Trimble, Thomas James Fullerton (Fall) Lisa Trimble (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EDEC 402. Students who have taken or are taking EDPT 200 or EDPT 204 cannot take this couse for credit.
  • EDEC 351 Third Professional Seminar (Secondary) (2 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Professional portfolios and competencies will be addressed. Preparation for the third field experience through engaging in the full spectrum of unit/lesson planning, critical analysis and self-reflection. Professional portfolios and competencies will be addressed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Ginette Clarke, Naved Bakali, Judy Kenworthy-Grant (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: EDEC 254 or EDEC 254D1/D2
    • Corequisites: EDFE 351 and EDES 350
    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. Secondary, B.Sc. and B.Ed. concurrent students only. Not open to students who have taken EDEC 306.
  • EDEC 404 Fourth Year Professional Seminar (Sec) (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Preparation for the final field experience and entry into the teaching profession. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to demonstrate ethical and responsible professional behaviour in the performance of duties across all professional competencies. Final transition to showcase working professional portfolios will be addressed.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Lisa Starr, Ginette Clarke, Jose Manuel Canella (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: EDEC 306 or EDEC 351, EDFE 351
    • Corequisite: EDFE 451
    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. Secondary students only
  • EDER 372 Ethics and Religious Culture (Secondary) (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Teaching methods and pedagogical resources for programs in moral education, ethics, and religious culture in the secondary school.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: A course in World Religion with a RELG or EDER prefix and a course in Ethics with a PHIL or EDER prefix - refer to B.Ed., Secondary Program advising information.
  • EDES 334 Teaching Secondary Social Studies 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Secondary Education : An examination of Quebec and other secondary school social studies curricula: Objectives; theoretical orientation; course structures; curriculum resources. Teaching and learning methodologies both common to the social studies and specific to the disciplines of history, geography, and economics.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Boghos Zanazanian (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: 18 credits of university social science courses at or above the 200 level
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EDEC 334
  • EDES 350 Classroom Practices (Secondary) (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Secondary Education : Competency-based discipline skills and methods of classroom management, emphasizing the relationship between theory and practice; the rationale for various approaches to classroom management; strategies for developing instruction that focus attention and reduce off-task behaviour.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: James Howden, William Keith Wilcox, Jason Lister, Megan Webster (Fall)

    • Corequisites: EDEC 351 and EDFE 351
  • EDFE 200 First Field Experience (K/Elem & Secondary) (2 credits)

    Offered by: Education - Dean's Office (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Student Teaching : Students are assigned to a school for a "participant observer" field experience. Students are expected to apprise themselves of Field Experience, dates, duration and responsibilities as outlined on the Office of Student Teaching website http://www.mcgill.ca/ost.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Fiona J Benson (Fall)

    • Corequisite: EDEC 201
    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. Secondary and B.Ed. K/Elem. students
  • EDFE 254 Second Field Experience (Secondary) (3 credits)

    Offered by: Education - Dean's Office (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Student Teaching : Supervised student teaching. Students are expected to apprise themselves of Field Experience, dates, duration and responsibilities as outlined on the Office of Student Teaching website http://www.mcgill.ca/ost.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: EDFE 200 or EDFE 209 or EDFE 246 or EDFE 205
    • Corequisite: EDEC 254 or EDEC 254D1
    • Note: Expectations for this field experience, according to your program, can be found at www.mcgill.ca/ost.
  • EDFE 351 Third Field Experience (Secondary) (8 credits)

    Offered by: Education - Dean's Office (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Student Teaching : Supervised student teaching in a school. Students are expected to apprise themselves of Field Experience, dates, duration and responsibilities as outlined on the Office of Student Teaching website http://www.mcgill.ca/ost.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Fiona J Benson (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: (EDFE 254 or EDFE 254D1/D2), (EDEC 254 or EDEC 254D1/D2), EDEC 215.
    • Corequisites: EDEC 351, EDES 350.
    • Restriction: Students must have completed, with a grade of C or higher, a minimum of 24 credits in a teachable subject and have taken the corresponding Methods courses as a co-requisite.
    • Note: Expectations for this field experience, according to your program, can be found at www.mcgill.ca/ost.
  • EDFE 451 Fourth Field Experience (Secondary) (7 credits)

    Offered by: Education - Dean's Office (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Student Teaching : Supervised student teaching in a school. Students will be expected to assume a much increased responsibility for student learning, classroom management, and evaluation. Students are expected to apprise themselves of Field Experience, dates, duration and responsibilities as outlined on the Office of Student Teaching website http://www.mcgill.ca/ost.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Fiona J Benson (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: EDFE 351.
    • Corequisite: EDEC 404.
    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. Secondary students only
    • Note: Expectations for this field experience, according to your program, can be found at www.mcgill.ca/ost.
  • EDPE 300 Educational Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Educational&Counselling Psych (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Ed Psych & Couns (Psychology) : Selected theories, models, and concepts relevant to planning and reflecting upon educational practice and improvement. Overview of development, learning, thinking, motivation, individual difference, etc. In relation to applications in classroom teaching and learning, the complementary role of counsellors and psychologists, educational computing and technology. The Youth Protection Act.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Scott Conrod, Camelia Birlean, Gus Appignanesi (Fall) Scott Conrod (Winter)

  • EDPE 304 Measurement and Evaluation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Educational&Counselling Psych (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Ed Psych & Couns (Psychology) : The purposes of examinations. Causes of complaints about examinations. Equalizing means and dispersions in distribution of marks. Standardized scores. The percentile system. Essay and objective-type examinations. Taxonomies of educational objectives. Validity and reliability: item analysis.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Gus Appignanesi (Fall) Gus Appignanesi, Marian Jazvac Martek (Winter)

  • EDPI 309 Diverse Learners (3 credits)

    Offered by: Educational&Counselling Psych (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Ed Psych & Couns (Inclusive) : Inclusion debates; review of the evolution of the history of inclusive education; models of development ( eco-systemic models); characteristics, teaching practices; teachers' roles in inclusive classrooms. Overview of characteristics, causes, needs, and teaching strategies for diverse and exceptional students, teaching and learning for differences in intellectual, emotional, behavioural, sensory, physical and learning domains found in effective inclusive classrooms. Working with families.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Roberta Thomson (Fall) Scott Conrod, Gus Appignanesi, Roberta Thomson, Maria Di Stasio (Winter)

    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. and Concurrent students only.
    • Offered through Continuing Education or Summer Studies.
    • Prerequisite: EDPI 341
  • EDPI 341 Instruction in Inclusive Schools (3 credits)

    Offered by: Educational&Counselling Psych (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Ed Psych & Couns (Inclusive) : Developing, planning, implementing and evaluating effective learning programs for diverse learners, and consideration of their more general applicability. Adapting curriculum and instruction for learners with varying abilities, learning styles, and needs. Collaboration with students, families, and other educators (or stakeholders) in the instructional process. Application of adaptations at the classroom and school level for all students in inclusive schools.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Scott Conrod, Ozlem Erten, Casey Finn Lefsrud, Amanda Saxe, David Hoida (Fall)

    • Restriction: Open to B.Ed. students only
    • Also offered through Continuing Education.
    • Prerequisite: EDPE 300.

Complementary Courses (6 credits)

6 credits selected as described below:

Multicultural Education

3 credits from:

  • EDEC 233 First Nations and Inuit Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Study of First Nations and Inuit schools as diverse social, cultural, linguistic, political and pedagogical settings. Considers school and community minority-majority interactions and their influence on teaching and learning in educational settings. Examines how a teacher's personal practice can be influenced by an understanding of these factors.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken, or are taking, EDEC 248 or EDEC 249
  • EDEC 248 Multicultural Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Introduction to theories about intercultural and multicultural education in Quebec and Canadian schools.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Ratna Ghosh, Mariusz Galczynski (Fall) Donna Lee Smith (Winter)

    • Restriction: Students who have taken or are taking EDEC 249 or EDEC 233 cannot take this course for credit.
  • EDEC 249 Global Education and Social Justice (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : A cross-curricular, interdisciplinary approach to teaching/creating learning experiences for students. It will foster critical thinking and nurture lifelong global understanding, active engagement and participation in relation to questions of social, economic, and environmental justice, by infusing these issues in the classroom.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Lerona Lewis (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken, or are taking, EDEC 233 or EDEC 248

Philosophy of Education

3 credits from:

  • EDEC 260 Philosophical Foundations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : Ideas essential for the development of a coherent educational theory and sound professional practice. Reflections on: the nature of the person, of reality, of knowledge, and of value; the aims of education, the nature of the school and the curriculum, the roles and responsibilities of professional educators.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Boyd Eric White, Boghos Zanazanian (Fall) Kevin Michael McDonough (Winter)

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken EDER 400. Students who have taken or are taking EDEC 261 cannot take this course for credit.
  • EDEC 261 Philosophy of Catholic Education (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Curriculum and Instruction : An exploration of the philosophy of Catholic education, and its relevance in the world today.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Robert Di Pede (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken EDER 398. Students who have taken or are taking EDEC 260 cannot take this course for credit.

Secondary Social Sciences - History and Citizenship, Geography Subject Area (54 credits)

Secondary Social Sciences - History and Citizenship, Geography students complete 54 credits selected in consultation with the Program Adviser with the following specifications:

Required Courses

History

6 credits selected from:

  • HIST 202 Survey: Canada to 1867 (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A survey of early Canada, from periods known mainly through archaeological records to the Confederation era. Social, cultural, economic and political themes will be examined.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Elsbeth Anne Heaman (Fall)

    • Fall
  • HIST 203 Survey: Canada since 1867 (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A survey of the development of Canada from Confederation to the present day. Social, economic and political history will be examined in a general way.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: David John Wright (Winter)

Complementary Courses (48 credits)

History and Citizenship (30 credits)

At least 12 of the 30 credits must be taken at the 300 or 400 level, distributed as follows:
3 credits from:
HIST 303 History of Quebec (3 credits)
HIST 353 History of Montreal (3 credits)
3-9 credits in European History
3-9 credits in Asian, African, American, Latin American, or Ancient History
9 credits of history courses on social history, gender history, identity, culture, religion and values, political life and institutions, conflict, wealth and poverty, science, and health
(Students may consult the course lists for History programs offered by the Faculty of Arts for guidance on course choices.)
6-12 credits selected from the following list (students must select a minimum of 3 credits ECON and a minimum of 3 credits POLI):

  • ANTH 338 Native Peoples of North America (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Ethnographic survey of Native cultures in North America. Conditions arising from European colonization and their social, economic and political impact. Contemporary situation of indigenous peoples.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite: ANTH 202, or ANTH 204, or ANTH 205, or ANTH 206, or ANTH 209, or ANTH 212, or GEOG 336, or permission of instructor
  • CANS 200 Introduction to the Study of Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Institute for Study of Canada (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Canadian Studies : An overview of approaches to the study of Canada, including economic, political, historical and cultural dimensions.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Mary Anne Poutanen (Fall)

  • ECON 199 FYS: Aspects of Globalization (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A guided discussion of the many and varied aspects of economic globalization.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Restriction: Open only to newly admitted students in U0 or U1, who may take only one FYS. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one of them.
    • Maximum 25
  • ECON 205 An Introduction to Political Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A critical study of the insights to be gained through economic analysis of a number of problems of broad interest. The focus will be on the application of economics to issues of public policy.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Thomas James Velk (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ECON 205D.
    • Restriction: This course does not count for credit towards the Minor Concentration, Major Concentration, or Honours degree in Economics.
  • ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis and Applications (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A university-level introduction to demand and supply, consumer behaviour, production theory, market structures and income distribution theory.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Paul Dickinson, Naureen Fatema, Irakli Japaridze (Fall) Paul Dickinson (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ECON 230 or ECON 250
  • ECON 209 Macroeconomic Analysis and Applications (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A university-level introduction to national income determination, money and banking, inflation, unemployment and economic policy.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Paul Dickinson (Fall) Paul Dickinson, Irakli Japaridze (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 or permission of the instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ECON 330 or ECON 352
  • ECON 219 Current Economic Problems: Topics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : This course will deal with topical issues of importance to the Canadian economy.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Thomas James Velk (Winter)

    • This course will also be of interest to students outside of Economics
  • ECON 221 Economic History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Survey of economic development. The evolution of economic institutions and the process of economic growth. Topics include demographic change, agrarian institutions, financial and industrial organization, technological change and the expansion of trade and markets.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Corequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or ECON 230D1/D2 or ECON 250D1/D2.
    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken ECON 201 or ECON 221D1/D2.
  • ECON 313 Economic Development 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Microeconomic theories of economic development and empirical evidence on population, labour, firms, poverty. Inequality and environment.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Matthieu Chemin, Eesha Sen Choudhury (Fall) Matthieu Chemin (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 208 and either ECON 209 or one development course.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 154-313D.
  • ECON 326 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic and structural aspects of the ecological crisis. A course in which subjects discussed include the conflict between economic growth and the laws of thermodynamics; the search for alternative economic indicators; the fossil fuels crisis; and "green'' fiscal policy.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Robin Thomas Naylor (Fall) Robin Thomas Naylor (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or consent of instructor
  • ECON 341 Economic History of a World Area (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Economic history of selected areas.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above
    • Coverage could vary from year to year.
  • ECON 347 Economics of Climate Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The course focuses on the economic implications of, and problems posed by, predictions of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Attention is given to economic policies such as carbon taxes and tradeable emission permits and to the problems of displacing fossil fuels with new energy technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: Isabel Galiana (Fall) Isabel Galiana (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above
  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Nicolas Kosoy, Elena Bennett, Kevin Manaugh, Christopher Barrington-Leigh (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015

    Instructors: David Goodin, Julia Freeman (Fall) Jaye Dana Ellis, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • POLI 211 Comparative Government and Politics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Introduction to the study of comparative politics as it applies both to the developed world and developing countries. The course presents the basic concepts and approaches used in the field of comparative politics and it focuses on patterns of similarity and difference in a way political institutions and processes are structured in a wide variety of national contexts.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas.
  • POLI 212 Government and Politics - Developed World (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The nature of politics in a few selected nations of the industrialized world, applying the concepts introduced in POLI 211 to specific national contexts. Countries studied will be drawn principally from Europe and North America.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Hudson Meadwell (Fall)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas.
  • POLI 221 Government of Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An examination of the central governmental institutions, including parliament, federalism, and the judiciary.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Richard Schultz (Fall)

    • Note: The field is Canadian Politics.
  • POLI 222 Political Process and Behaviour in Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to contemporary political life in Canada that examines how demands are identified and transmitted through the political systems. Emphasis will be placed on: the Canadian political culture; socialization and political participation; the electoral system; elections and voting; the role and structure of political parties; and the influence of organized interest.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Christa Scholtz (Winter)

    • Note: The field is Canadian Politics.
  • POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to Third World politics. A comparative examination of the legacies of colonialism, the achievement of independence, and contemporary dynamics of political and socio-economic development in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Topics include modernization, dependency, state-building and national integration, revolution, the role of the military, and democratization.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Julie Norman (Winter)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.
  • POLI 243 International Politics of Economic Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to international relations, through examples drawn from international political economy. The emphasis will be on the politics of trade and international monetary relations.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Mark R Brawley (Winter)

    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 244 International Politics: State Behaviour (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Offers a comprehensive introduction to the behaviour of nation states. Explores how states make foreign policy decisions and what motivates their behaviour. Other covered topics include the military and economic dimensions of state behaviour, conflict, cooperation, interdependence, integration, globalisation, and change in the international system.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Fernando Nunez (Fall)

    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 341 Foreign Policy: The Middle East (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An examination of the changing regional security environment and the evolving foreign policies and relationships of Arab states in three areas - relations with non-Arab regional powers (Israel, Iran), inter-Arab relations, Great Power relations. The course will focus particularly on Egypt, Syria, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Julie Norman (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: A 200- or 300- level course in International Relations or Middle East politics or permission of the instructor
    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 345 International Organizations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The politics and processes of global governance in the 21st century, with a special emphasis on the United Nations system.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: A basic course in International Politics or written consent of instructor
    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 354 Approaches to International Political Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The course presents theoretical approaches to understanding change in the international political economy.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: A basic course in International Relations and an introductory course in Macro Economics
    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 360 Security: War and Peace (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Focuses on international security and strategies of war and peace in historical and comparative frameworks. Topics include case studies of 20th century wars, conventional and nuclear strategy, and various approaches to peace.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: T V Paul (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: A basic course in International Relations or written permission of the instructor
    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • POLI 362 Political Theory and International Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Key contributions of political theory to the study and practice of international relations. Three prevailing theoretical traditions will be examined: realism, 'international society', and cosmopolitanism. Key practical issues to be explored from these perspectives include war, humanitarian intervention, economic globalization, environment, and gender.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Catherine Lu (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: A 200 or 300-level course in political theory, and POLI 243 or POLI 244
    • Note: The fields are International Politics and Political Theory.
  • POLI 423 Politics of Ethno-Nationalism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Theories of ethno-nationalism examined in light of experience in Asia, Middle East and Africa. Topics include formation and mobilization of national, ethnic and religious identities in colonial and post-colonial societies; impact of ethno-nationalism on pluralism, democracy, class and gender relations; means to preserve tolerance in multicultural societies.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Narendra Subramanian (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: one 300 or 400-level course in comparative politics; and one 300 or 400-level course on developing areas (any discipline.) The same course can fulfill both requirements
    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.
  • POLI 435 Identity and Inequality (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Inequality is often particularly durable between groups whose boundaries are based on assumed ancestry - e.g., the major ethnic categories in former European settler colonies, castes in South Asia. This course explores ongoing changes in the relationship between identity and social, economic and political inequality in some of these contexts.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Narendra Subramanian (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: 300 level course in comparative politics or related social science course.
  • POLI 442 International Relations of Ethnic Conflict (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Issues related to the internationalization of ethnic conflict, including diasporas, contagion and demonstration effects, intervention, irredentism, the use of sanctions and force. Combination of theory and the study of contemporary cases.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: POLI 244 or permission of instructor
  • POLI 450 Peacebuilding (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An examination of transitions from civil war to peace, and the role of external actors (international organizations, bilateral donors, non-governmental organizations) in support of such transitions. Topics will include the dilemmas of humanitarian relief, peacekeeping operations, refugees, the demobilization of ex-combatants, transitional elections, and the politics of socio-economic reconstruction.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Rex J Brynen (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: previous courses in comparative politics/developing areas and international relations. Internet research skills are strongly recommended
    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas; also in the field of International Politics.
  • POLI 474 Inequality and Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The political structures and social forces underlying poverty and inequality in the developing world; the historical roots of inequality in different regions, varying manifestations of inequality (class, region, ethnicity, gender), and selected contemporary problems.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: A basic course in Comparative Politics or a course on the region or written permission of the instructor.
    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.

Geography

18 credits from:

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Brian Leung, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, George McCourt, Sylvie de Blois (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • GEOG 200 Geographical Perspectives: World Environmental Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to geography as the study of nature and human beings in a spatial context. An integrated approach to environmental systems and the human organization of them from the viewpoint of spatial relationships and processes. Special attention to environmental problems as a constraint upon Third World development.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: James Ford (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present and Future (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of global change, from the Quaternary Period to the present day involving changes in the physical geography of specific areas. Issues such as climatic change and land degradation will be discussed, with speculations on future environments.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Gail L Chmura (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Jon Unruh, Brian Robinson (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course introduces the geography of the world economic system. It describes the spatial distribution of economic activities and examines the factors which influence their changing location. Case studies from both "developed" and "developing" countries will test the different geographical theories presented in lectures.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Oliver T Coomes, Sebastien Breau (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 217 Cities in the Modern World (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to urban geography. Uses a spatial/geographic perspective to understand cities and their social and cultural processes. Addresses two major areas. The development and social dynamics in North American and European cities. The urban transformations in Asian, African, and Latin American societies that were recently predominantly rural and agrarian.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Benjamin Forest, Natalie Oswin (Winter)

    • Note: Winter
    • Note: 3 hours
  • GEOG 272 Earth's Changing Surface (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the study of landforms as products of geomorphic and geologic systems acting at and near the Earth's surface. The process geomorphology approach will be used to demonstrate how landforms of different geomorphic settings represent a dynamic balance between forces acting in the environment and the physical properties of materials present.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 301 Geography of Nunavut (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to the physical and cultural geography of Canada's newest territory. The course will emphasize the bio-physical heterogeneity of the natural environment and the cultural and political ecology of the human population.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: George Wenzel (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 309 Geography of Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to the geography of Canada. A comprehensive geographical interpretation of Canada's salient physical and human characteristics, including landscapes and their evolution, climate, vegetation, society/land relationships and socio-economic attributes of the population.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Restriction: Cannot be taken by students who have taken CANS 303 after 2007.
  • GEOG 311 Economic Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Different theories and approaches to understanding the spatial organization of economic activities. Regional case studies drawn from North America, Europe and Asia used to reinforce concepts. Emphasis also on city-regions and their interaction with the global economy.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sebastien Breau (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 331 Urban Social Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Social space and social time. The reflection of social structure in the spatial organization of the city. Historical perspective on changing personal mobility, life cycle, family structure and work organization. The appropriation and alienation of urban spaces.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Natalie Oswin (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or GEOG 217 or permission of instructor

Note: In consultation with the Program Adviser, students may choose their Geography courses from those that comprise the B.A. Minor Concentration Geography program.

Electives (6 credits)

Faculty of Education—2014-2015 (last updated Feb. 18, 2014) (disclaimer)