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Minor Concentration Geography (Urban Systems) (18 credits)

Offered by: Geography     Degree: Bachelor of Arts

Program Requirements

This Minor concentration may be expanded into the Major Concentration Geography (Urban Systems).

Complementary Courses (18 credits)

18 credits selected as follows:

Group A

9-12 credits selected from:

  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Jon Unruh, Brian Robinson (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 217 Cities in the Modern World (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to urban geography. Uses a spatial/geographic perspective to understand cities and their social and cultural processes. Addresses two major areas. The development and social dynamics in North American and European cities. The urban transformations in Asian, African, and Latin American societies that were recently predominantly rural and agrarian.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Benjamin Forest, Natalie Oswin (Winter)

    • Note: Winter
    • Note: 3 hours
  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite: One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 203, GEOG 210, GEOG 216, GEOG 217; or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 311 Economic Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Different theories and approaches to understanding the spatial organization of economic activities. Regional case studies drawn from North America, Europe and Asia used to reinforce concepts. Emphasis also on city-regions and their interaction with the global economy.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sebastien Breau (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 315 Urban Transportation Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discusses the history and development of urban transportation systems, as well as problems and potential solutions from a geographic perspective. Specific topics include analysis of the social, economic, and environmental impacts; interaction of land use and transportation systems; the analysis of urban travel behaviour; and the implications of various policy alternatives.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Kevin Manaugh (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 217 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 316 Political Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The study of the spatial dimensions of political activities and developments at the regional, national and global levels in historical and contemporary perspective. Presentation of case studies relating to the theoretical framework of political geography.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Benjamin Forest (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 325 New Master-Planned Cities (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course examines the origins, designs, motivations and cultural politics of planned cities, focusing primarily on those currently under construction in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. A variety of themes will be explored including design responses to urban pollution and over-crowding, 'new' cities from earlier decades, totalitarianism and the city, utopianism, 'green' cities, and 'creative' cities. The course examines the various motivations underlying the design and construction of planned cities and how they are shaped by power, religion, and political ideologies. There will be a focus on evolving concepts used in city design as well as the continuities and cultural revivalism expressed through urban design and architecture. Students interested in urban and cultural geography, cities, architecture and planning in different cultural contexts will enjoy this course.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sarah Moser (Winter)

    • Prerequisite(s): GEOG 210 or GEOG 217, or equivalent with permission of instructor.
  • GEOG 331 Urban Social Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Social space and social time. The reflection of social structure in the spatial organization of the city. Historical perspective on changing personal mobility, life cycle, family structure and work organization. The appropriation and alienation of urban spaces.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Natalie Oswin (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or GEOG 217 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 494 Urban Field Studies (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Geographical research in urban public and semi-public spaces. Demonstration of techniques of mapping, sampling, measurement, photography, interviewing. Attention to research design.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Summer 2015

    Instructors: Kevin Manaugh (Fall) Sarah Moser (Summer)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 203, GEOG 210, GEOG 216, GEOG 217, GEOG 272, or permission of instructor
    • **Due to the intensive nature of this course, the standard add/drop and withdrawal deadlines do not apply. Add/drop is the second lecture day and withdrawal is the fourth lecture day.
  • GEOG 525 Asian Cities in the 21st Century (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course examines current themes relating to mass urbanization in Asia in a range of contexts and the forces that shape the built environment of Asian cities. Various approaches to understanding Asian cities and current theoretical debates will be investigated, including recent critiques of western-centric theorizations of urban change in the region. The course examines a variety of themes through which students will gain familiarity with some of the major strands relating to urban change in Asia: national identity, neoliberalism, social exclusions, migration, religion, ethnicity and sustainability.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Sarah Moser (Fall)

    • Prerequisite(s): GEOG 325, or 9 credits of Geography courses in Urban Geography, or permission of the instructor.
    • Open to graduate students and final year undergraduates.

Group B

6-9 credits selected from:

Architecture

Although Architecture courses have prerequisites, they are waived for Urban Systems students, but the course may not be taken before the year indicated:

U2 - ARCH 378;
U3 - ARCH 515, ARCH 527, ARCH 528, ARCH 529, and ARCH 550.

Note: ARCH 550 has the same content as CIVE 433 but requires an additional project.

  • ARCH 378 Site Usage (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : The study of the creation, form and usage of the exterior space generated in various patterns of low-rise housing. Socio-cultural aspects of patterns; exterior space as a logical extension of the living unit; social control of the use of urban and suburban land; comparative model for low-rise housing patterns.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • (2-0-7)
    • Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of instructor
  • ARCH 515 Sustainable Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : This course will address sustainable design theory and applications in the built environment with students from a variety of fields (architecture, urban planning, engineering, sociology, environmental studies, economics, international studies). Architecture will provide the focus for environmental, socio-cultural and economic issues.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Michael Jemtrud (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)
    • Prerequisite: ARCH 377 or permission of instructor.
  • ARCH 527 Civic Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : The elements of form in buildings and their siting design in the urban setting.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • (2-0-7)
    • Prerequisite: ARCH 378
  • ARCH 528 History of Housing (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : Indigenous housing both transient and permanent, from the standpoint of individual structure and pattern of settlements. The principal historic examples of houses including housing in the age of industrial revolution and contemporary housing.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Pieter Sijpkes (Winter)

    • (2-0-7)
    • Prerequisite: ARCH 251 or permission of instructor
  • ARCH 529 Housing Theory (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : A review of environmental alternatives in housing; contemporary housing and the physical and sociological determinants that shape it; Canadian housing.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Vikram Bhatt (Fall)

    • (2-0-7)
    • Prerequisite: ARCH 528 or permission of instructor
  • ARCH 550 Urban Planning and Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : A survey of municipal, regional and provincial actions to guide urban development in Canada, with a particular emphasis on Montreal and Quebec. It also introduces students to concepts in real-estate development and highlights the relationship between developers and planners.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Nicholas Luka (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)
    • Prerequisite: B.Sc.(Arch.) or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not normally open to Urban Planning students

Art History & Communication Studies

  • COMS 425 Urban Culture & Everyday Life (3 credits)

    Offered by: Art History & Communication Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Communication Studies : Explores how popular and artistic cultural texts interrogate the dimensions of urban culture that shape everyday life, such as transnationalization/ globalization; gentrification, migration and other displacements; the proliferation of mobile media and communication technologies; and the political mobilization of fear and anxiety about violence and terrorism.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: One of the following 200-level courses: COMS 200, COMS 210, COMS 230 AND one of the following 300-level courses: COMS 300, COMS 310, COMS 320, COMS 330, COMS 340, COMS 350, COMS 354, COMS 361, COMS 362, COMS 365 or permission of the instructor.

Civil Engineering

CIVE 433 requires departmental permission to register (telephone: 514-398-6345).

  • CIVE 433 Urban Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : The City in History. The planning profession, evolution of planning in North America, Canada and Quebec. Planning theories, the general or master plan, planning processes and techniques, planning and design of residential subdivisions. Local planning issues, housing policies, planning laws.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Nicholas Luka (Winter)

    • (3-1-5)
    • Restriction: Not open to U0 and U1 students.
  • CIVE 540 Urban Transportation Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Process and techniques of urban transportation engineering and planning, including demand analysis framework, data collection procedures, travel demand modelling and forecasting, and cost-effectiveness framework for evaluation of project and system alternatives.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • (3-1-5)
    • Prerequisite: CIVE 319 or permission of instructor.

Geography

  • GEOG 307 Socioeconomic Applications of GIS (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : GIS applied to the spatial analysis of socioeconomic and market data. Topics include geographic market segmentation, geodemographics, spatial decision-support systems and modelling applications of GIS. Empirical focus is on analysing spatial patterns of population and consumption characteristics in cities and on facility location problems. Emphasis on visualization and problem solving.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Raja Sengupta (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours and laboratory
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 201, MATH 203 or equivalent
  • GEOG 315 Urban Transportation Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discusses the history and development of urban transportation systems, as well as problems and potential solutions from a geographic perspective. Specific topics include analysis of the social, economic, and environmental impacts; interaction of land use and transportation systems; the analysis of urban travel behaviour; and the implications of various policy alternatives.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Kevin Manaugh (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 217 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 325 New Master-Planned Cities (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course examines the origins, designs, motivations and cultural politics of planned cities, focusing primarily on those currently under construction in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. A variety of themes will be explored including design responses to urban pollution and over-crowding, 'new' cities from earlier decades, totalitarianism and the city, utopianism, 'green' cities, and 'creative' cities. The course examines the various motivations underlying the design and construction of planned cities and how they are shaped by power, religion, and political ideologies. There will be a focus on evolving concepts used in city design as well as the continuities and cultural revivalism expressed through urban design and architecture. Students interested in urban and cultural geography, cities, architecture and planning in different cultural contexts will enjoy this course.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sarah Moser (Winter)

    • Prerequisite(s): GEOG 210 or GEOG 217, or equivalent with permission of instructor.
  • GEOG 525 Asian Cities in the 21st Century (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course examines current themes relating to mass urbanization in Asia in a range of contexts and the forces that shape the built environment of Asian cities. Various approaches to understanding Asian cities and current theoretical debates will be investigated, including recent critiques of western-centric theorizations of urban change in the region. The course examines a variety of themes through which students will gain familiarity with some of the major strands relating to urban change in Asia: national identity, neoliberalism, social exclusions, migration, religion, ethnicity and sustainability.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Sarah Moser (Fall)

    • Prerequisite(s): GEOG 325, or 9 credits of Geography courses in Urban Geography, or permission of the instructor.
    • Open to graduate students and final year undergraduates.

History

  • HIST 353 History of Montreal (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : The history of Montreal from its beginnings to the present day. Montreal's economic, social, cultural and political role within the French and British empires, North America, Canada, and Quebec; the city's linguistic and ethnic diversity.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: HIST 202 or HIST 203 or permission of the instructor.
  • HIST 397 Canada: Ethnicity, Migration (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Immigration, ethnicity and race in Canada in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include the migration process, government policy and legislation, urban and rural migration, acculturation, nativism and multiculturalism.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: HIST 202 and HIST 203 or permission of the instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken HIST 423

Political Science

  • POLI 318 Comparative Local Government (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An examination of the organization and conduct of local government in Canada, the United States, and selected European countries. Attention to theories of local government, the criteria for comparative analysis, the provision of public goods and bads, urban political patterns and the constitution of new institutional arrangements to deal with "urban crises" in North America.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Filippo Sabetti (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: POLI 211 or POLI 212 or written permission of instructor
    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas; also in the field of Canadian Politics.
  • POLI 321 Issues: Canadian Public Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The Canadian political process through an analysis of critical policy issues in community development, welfare state, education, and institutional reforms in public service delivery systems. Diagnostic and prescriptive interpretations of public choices in a federal-parliamentary regime.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Filippo Sabetti (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: at least one other course in Canadian or Comparative Politics
    • Note: The field is Canadian Politics.
  • POLI 337 Canadian Public Administration (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Organization and practice of public administration at the federal provincial and local level in Canada. Contrasting theories/techniques of public administration and policy, organization of field offices for delivery of essential public services, governments as employers, and institutional and policy changes to resolve crisis inherent in "the paradoxical view of bureaucracy".

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: at least one other course in Canadian government or politics
    • Note: The field is Canadian Politics.

Sociology

  • SOCI 230 Sociology of Ethnic Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : An introduction to the sociological study of minority groups in Canada. The course will explore the themes of racism, prejudice, and discrimination, ethnic and racial inequalities, cultural identities, multiculturalism, immigration. Theoretical, empirical, and policy issues will be discussed. While the focus will be primarily on Canada, comparisons will be made with the United States.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Zoua Vang (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: SOCI 210 or permission of instructor
  • SOCI 333 Social Stratification (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : The pattern, causes and consequences of social inequality. Among the inequalities considered are those of economic class, sex (gender), race, ethnicity and age. Competing theories of the causes of social inequalities are compared and assessed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Thomas Soehl (Fall)

  • SOCI 388 Crime (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introductory course on methods and theories in criminology. Exploration of the nature and distribution of crime; and critical evaluation of definitions and the measurement of crime; review of theoretical approaches used to understand such a phenomenon; a comparative overview of the criminal justice system.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Milaine Alarie (Fall)

Urban Planning

  • URBP 201 Planning the 21st Century City (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : The study of how urban planners respond to the challenges posed by contemporary cities world-wide. Urban problems related to the environment, shelter, transport, human health, livelihoods and governance are addressed; innovative plans to improve cities and city life are analyzed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • (3-1-5)
  • URBP 501 Principles and Practice 1 (2 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : This six-week intensive course exposes students to issues and techniques that are applicable in diverse professional planning contexts. The subject matter, geographic area, scale of intervention and institutional location of planning varies from semester to semester. The course focuses on a specific case study and is taught by a visiting lecturer with professional experience in the selected subject matter.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Malaka Ackaoui (Winter)

    • (2-0-4)
  • URBP 506 Environmental Policy and Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Analytical and institutional approaches for understanding and addressing urban and other environmental problems at various scales; characteristics of environmental problems and implications; political-institutional context and policy instruments; risk perception and implications; cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, multiple-objectives approaches, life-cycle analysis; policy implementation issues; case studies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • (3-0-6)
    • Restriction: This course is open to students in U3 and above
Faculty of Arts—2014-2015 (last updated Feb. 18, 2014) (disclaimer)