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Mathematics and Statistics (MATH)

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH)

Location

Location

  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B9

About Mathematics and Statistics

About Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics has evolved to a discipline that is mainly characterized by its method of proof, its concern for a progressive broadening of its concepts, and by the search for mathematical entities and operations that represent aspects of reality. It is a subject that is pursued by many for its own sake, and regarded as part of the mainstream of human culture. Mathematics pervades modern society with an impact which, already immense, is rapidly growing.

The two principal divisions of mathematics are pure mathematics and applied mathematics. The pure mathematician is interested in abstract mathematical structures and in mathematics as an intellectual enterprise. The primary concern may not be with its utilitarian aspects or with the current needs of science and technology, although many problems in pure mathematics have developed from the sciences.

The applied mathematician is more interested in how mathematics can be used to study some aspects of the world. Mathematicians are engaged in the creation, study, and application of advanced mathematical methods relevant to scientific problems. Statistical science and methodology today is concerned with phenomena in which there is a background of uncertainty arising from inherent variability and the investigator is obliged to arrive at decisions from limited data. A key tool in statistics is probability.

Some of the fields in which pure mathematicians work are algebra, analysis, geometry, topology, number theory, and foundations. Applied mathematics, which once referred to the application of mathematics to such disciplines as mechanics and fluid dynamics, has currently assumed a much broader meaning and embraces such diverse fields as communication theory, theory of optimization, theory of games, and numerical analysis.

Mathematics offers many vocational possibilities. Such fields as teaching, computing, applied statistics, and actuarial science offer opportunities for B.Sc. graduates. Opportunities to do original research in pure and applied mathematics are available in universities and research institutions. Employment is to be found in financially or technologically oriented business firms. The Department of Mathematics and Statistics through its various programs attempts to provide courses to suit the diverse interests within mathematics and statistics.

The Honours program demands of the student a talent for abstraction in addition to a high level of competence in the use of mathematical tools. This program is intended for students who plan to work in an area where mathematical innovations may be needed. It is almost essential for students contemplating a career in mathematical research.

The Major program involves the same subjects as the Honours program, but is less demanding in terms of abstraction. It is designed primarily for students who will need mathematical tools in their work but whose creative activity will involve applications of mathematics to other areas. Within the framework of the Mathematics Major, various combinations of courses are suggested to meet the needs of different students. These include course suggestions for secondary school teachers, careers in management, and for careers in industry, government, or actuarial sciences.

It is possible for Major students to include a number of Honours courses in their programs. This will be an advantage for those students who plan to use their mathematics in graduate studies.

Students interested in a Mathematics program linked to other disciplines are advised to consider the B.Sc. Liberal program with a core component in Mathematics or Statistics, or our joint programs with Computer Science, Physiology, and Physics.

In planning their programs, students are advised to seriously consider developing some depth in another discipline—preferably one for which mathematics has some relevance and use. Mathematics has been closely linked to areas such as computer science, physics, and engineering, but has recently come to play an increasingly important role in fields such as biology, linguistics, management, and psychology. Students should consider completing the requirements for minor programs such as those available in Cognitive Science, Computer Science, and Statistics.

Students considering programs in Mathematics and Statistics should contact the Department to arrange for academic advising.

The student's attention is called to the fact that a B.Com. degree with a Major in Mathematics is available from the Desautels Faculty of Management. In addition, the Schulich School of Music offers the B.Mus. degree with Honours in Theory with Mathematics option.

Internship Opportunities

Internship Opportunities

Students who want to get practical experience in industry before graduation are encouraged to participate in one of the following internship programs:

  • The Internship Year in Science (IYS) is an academic program offered for a duration of 8, 12, or 16 months. It is reflected on the transcript and included in the program name (Bachelor of Science – Internship program). Eligible students usually take this program between their U2 and U3 years.
  • The Industrial Practicum (IP) has a duration of four months and is usually carried out starting in May. It will appear as a 0-credit, Pass/Fail course on your transcript.

For more information on these programs, consult Industrial Practicum (IP) and Internship Year in Science (IYS).

Note: Students entering a program listed below that has MATH 222 (Calculus 3) as a required course and who have successfully completed a course equivalent to MATH 222 with a grade of C or better may omit MATH 222 (Calculus 3) from the program, but must replace it with 3 credits of elective courses.

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH) Faculty

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH) Faculty

Chair
Jacques Hurtubise
Emeritus Professors
Michael Barr; A.B., Ph.D.(Penn.) (Peter Redpath Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics)
William G. Brown; M.A.(Col.), B.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Marta Bunge; M.A., Ph.D.(Penn.)
Ian Connell; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Manit.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Kohur GowriSankaran; B.A., M.A.(Madr.), Ph.D.(Bom.)
Paul Koosis; B.A., Ph.D.(Calif., Berk.)
Joachim Lambek; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C. (Peter Redpath Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics)
Michael Makkai; M.A., Ph.D.(Bud.) (Peter Redpath Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics)
Sherwin A. Maslowe; B.Sc.(Wayne State), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Calif.)
Arak M. Mathai; M.Sc.(Kerala), M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Karl Peter Russell; Vor.Dip.(Hamburg), Ph.D.(Calif.)
Georg Schmidt; B.Sc.(Natal), M.Sc.(S. Af.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
V. Seshadri; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Madr.), Ph.D.(Okla.)
George P.H. Styan; M.A., Ph.D.(Col.)
Kwok Kuen Tam; M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
John C. Taylor; B.Sc.(Acad.), M.A.(Qu.), Ph.D.(McM.)
Sanjo Zlobec; M.Sc.(Zagreb), Ph.D.(N'western)
Professors
William J. Anderson; B.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Rustum Choksi; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Brown)
Henri Darmon; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Stephen W. Drury; M.A., Ph.D.(Cant.)
Christian Genest; B.Sp.Sc.(UQAC), M.Sc.(UQAM), Ph.D.(Br. Col) (Canada Research Chair)
Eyal Z. Goren; B.A., M.S., Ph.D.(Hebrew)
Pengfei Guan; B.Sc.(Zhejiang), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Princ.) (Canada Research Chair)
Jacques C. Hurtubise; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Oxf.), F.R.S.C.
Dmitry Jakobson; B.Sc.(MIT), Ph.D.(Princ.) (William Dawson Scholar)
Vojkan Jaksic; B.S.(Belgrade), Ph.D.(Calif. Tech.)
Niky Kamran; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Brussels), Ph.D.(Wat.), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Charles Roth; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Hebrew)
F. Bruce Shepherd; B.Sc.(Vic., Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Wat.) (James McGill Professor)
David A. Stephens; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Nott.) (James McGill Professor)
John A. Toth; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McM.), Ph.D.(MIT)
Daniel T. Wise; B.A.(Yeshiva), Ph.D.(Princ.)
David Wolfson; M.Sc.(Natal), Ph.D.(Purd.)
JianJu Xu; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Beijing), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Renss.)
Associate Professors
Masoud Asgharian; B.Sc.(Shahid Beheshti), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Peter Bartello; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appt. with Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences)
Antony Humphries; B.A., M.A.(Camb.), Ph.D.(Bath)
Wilbur Jonsson; M.Sc.(Manit.), Dr.Rer.Nat.(Tübingen)
Ivo Klemes; B.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Calif. Tech.)
James G. Loveys; B.A.(St. Mary's), M.Sc., Ph.D.(S. Fraser)
Johanna Neslehova; Vor.Dip.(Prague), Dip.(Hamburg), Ph.D.(Oldenburg)
Adam Oberman; B.S.(Tor.), M.S., Ph.D.(Chic.)
Neville G.F. Sancho; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Belf.)
Robert Seiringer; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Vienna) (William Dawson Scholar)
Russell Steele; B.S., M.S.(Carn. Mell), Ph.D.(Wash.)
Adrian Vetta; B.Sc., M.Sc.(LSE), Ph.D.(MIT) (joint appt. with Computer Science)
Assistant Professors
Louigi Addario-Berry; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Abbas Khalili; B.S., M.S.(Esfahan), Ph.D.(Wat.)
Jean-Christophe Nave; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Calif., Santa Barbara)
Sergey Norin; M.S.(St.-Petersburg), Ph.D.(Georgia Tech.)
Mikael Pichot; B.Sc.(Lyon), M.S., Ph.D.(École Normale-Lyon)
Gantumur Tsogtgerel; B.Sc.(Mongolia), M.Sc.(Netherlands), Ph.D.(Utrecht)
Johannes Walcher; Dip., Ph.D.(ETH) (joint appt. with Physics) (Canada Research Chair)
Associate Members
Xiao-Wen Chang (Computer Science)
Luc P. Devroye (Computer Science)
P.R.L. Dutilleul (Plant Science)
Eliot Fried (Mechanical Engineering)
Leon Glass (Physiology)
George Haller (Mechanical Engineering)
James A. Hanley (Epidemiology & Biostatistics)
Hamed Hatami (Computer Science)
Lawrence Joseph (Epidemiology & Biostatistics)
Anmar Khadra (Physiology)
Michael Mackey (Physiology)
Erica E.M. Moodie (Epidemiology & Biostatistics)
Lawrence A. Mysak (Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences)
Christopher Conway Paige (Computer Science)
Prakash Panangaden (Computer Science)
Robert W. Platt (Pediatrics)
James O. Ramsay (Psychology)
George Alexander Whitmore (Management)
Christina Wolfson (Epidemiology & Biostatistics)
Adjunct Professors
Vasek Chvatal; M.A.(Charles U., Prague), Ph.D.(Wat.)
Martin J. Gander; M.S.(ETH), M.S., Ph.D.(Stan.)
Andrew Granville; B.A., CASM(Camb.), Ph.D.(Qu.)
Adrian Iovita; B.S.(Bucharest), Ph.D.(Boston)
Olga Kharlampovich; M.A.(Ural State), Ph.D.(Leningrad), Dr.Sc.(Steklov Institute)
Ming Mei; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Jiangxi Normal Univ.), Ph.D.(Kanazawa)
Alexei Miasnikov; M.Sc.(Novosibirsk), Ph.D., Dr.Sc.(Leningrad)
M. Ram Murty; B.Sc.(Car.), Ph.D.(MIT), F.R.S.C.
Vladimir Remeslennikov; M.Sc.(Perm, Russia), Ph.D.(Novosibirsk)
Robert A. Seely; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cant.)
Alain C. Vandal; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Auck.)
Thomas Wihler; M.S., Ph.D.(ETH)
Faculty Lecturers
Jose A. Correa; M.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Car.)
Axel Hundemer; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich)
Armel Djivede Kelome; M.Sc.(Benin), M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Georgia Tech.)

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Minor Mathematics (24 credits)

The Minor may be taken in conjunction with any primary program in the Faculty of Science (other than programs in Mathematics). Students should declare their intention to follow the Minor Mathematics at the beginning of the penultimate year and should obtain approval for the selection of courses to fulfil the requirements for the Minor from the Departmental Chief ...

For more information, see Minor Mathematics (24 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Minor Statistics (24 credits)

The Minor may be taken in conjunction with any primary program in the Faculty of Science. Students should declare their intention to follow the Minor Statistics at the beginning of the penultimate year and must obtain approval for the selection of courses to fulfil the requirements for the Minor from the Departmental Chief Adviser (or delegate). All courses ...

For more information, see Minor Statistics (24 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Liberal Program - Core Science Component Mathematics (45 credits)

For more information, see Liberal Program - Core Science Component Mathematics (45 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Liberal Program - Core Science Component Statistics (45 credits)

For more information, see Liberal Program - Core Science Component Statistics (45 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Major Mathematics (54 credits)

For more information, see Major Mathematics (54 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Major Mathematics and Computer Science (72 credits)

For more information, see Major Mathematics and Computer Science (72 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Major Statistics and Computer Science (72 credits)

This program provides students with a solid training in both computer science and statistics together with the necessary mathematical background. As statistical endeavours involve ever increasing amounts of data, some students may want training in both disciplines.

For more information, see Major Statistics and Computer Science (72 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Honours Applied Mathematics (60 credits)

Applied Mathematics is a very broad field and students are encouraged to choose a coherent program of complementary courses. Most students specialize in "continuous" or "discrete" applied mathematics, but there are many sensible combinations of courses, and the following informal guidelines should be discussed with the student's adviser. Also, aside from seeking ...

For more information, see Honours Applied Mathematics (60 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Honours Mathematics (60 credits)

For more information, see Honours Mathematics (60 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Joint Honours Mathematics and Computer Science (75 credits)

Students may complete this program with a minimum of 72 credits or a maximum of 75 credits depending on whether or not they are exempt from taking COMP 202.

For more information, see Joint Honours Mathematics and Computer Science (75 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Honours Probability and Statistics (64 credits)

For more information, see Honours Probability and Statistics (64 credits).

Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) - Honours Statistics and Computer Science (79 credits)

This is a challenging program providing students with a solid training in both computer science and statistics suitable for entry into graduate school in either discipline. Students may complete this program with a minimum of 76 credits or a maximum of 79 credits depending on whether or not they are exempt from taking COMP 202.

For more information, see Honours Statistics and Computer Science (79 credits).

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH) Related Programs

Mathematics and Statistics (MATH) Related Programs

Joint Major in Biology and Mathematics

Joint Major in Biology and Mathematics

Joint Major in Physiology and Mathematics

Joint Major in Physiology and Mathematics

Joint Honours Program in Mathematics and Physics

Joint Honours Program in Mathematics and Physics

Faculty of Science—2013-2014 (last updated Feb. 26, 2013) (disclaimer)