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Application Procedures for Undergraduate Programs (Law)

Application Procedures for Undergraduate Programs (Law)

Law at McGill is a limited enrolment program. Apply as early as possible and ensure that we have received all required supporting documents on or before the appropriate deadline. Files are reviewed only when complete.

Online application

Online application

Candidates must apply to the B.C.L./LL.B. program online. The online application is available as of September 1. In order to avoid unnecessary processing delays, please read the application instructions carefully. Please undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca (email) the Undergraduate Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law if you are unable to apply online.

Once you have applied, an acknowledgment notice will be sent to the email address indicated on your application the day following the submission of your application form. If you have not received your acknowledgment notice the day following the submission of your application, you should contact the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law (514-398-6602 or undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca (email)).

Verifying the status of your application via Minerva

Verifying the status of your application via Minerva

Your acknowledgment notice will provide you with your McGill Identification (ID), and a password that you will need to log in to the Minerva website.

You are responsible for monitoring the status of your application on Minerva. When verifying the status of your application, an indication of “Items outstanding” means that your application is incomplete. If your application remains incomplete after the deadline for submission of supporting documents, your application will be cancelled. An indication of “Ready for review” means that your file is complete and/or under review by the Admissions Committee. Your status will indicate “Ready for review” until a final decision is rendered.

  • Your file will not be cancelled if only your LSAT score is missing after the deadline. The status of your application will indicate “Items outstanding” until we get your score. If writing the LSAT, your file will be circulated for review by the Admissions Committee only when all pending LSAT results are received.

During peak periods (i.e., close to deadlines), the Admissions Office receives a high volume of documents and there may be a delay of up to 48 hours between the receipt of a document and the date on which it is recorded in our information system and verifiable by you on Minerva. Taking this delay into consideration, please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office only if your file remains incomplete 48 hours past the deadline.

Review of Applications by Admissions Committee

Review of Applications by Admissions Committee

Once an application is complete, it is reviewed by the Admissions Committee. Without exception, every application to the McGill program is reviewed by at least one member of the Admissions Committee; the majority of applications are reviewed by two or three members. Committee members carefully review all documents submitted and evaluate the candidacy according to the Faculty's Admissions Policy, and in comparison to all other candidates in the applicant pool.

Decisions on Applications

Decisions on Applications

The official decision of the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law is released by electronic mail and confirmed via the candidate's Minerva account. Decisions on individual applications cannot and will not be disclosed over the phone.

Application Fee

Application Fee

A non-refundable application fee of CAD$100 is required for application to the B.C.L./LL.B. program. A credit card (Visa, MasterCard, or American Express only) is required to complete the online application form. McGill's highly secured e-payment service minimizes cardholder risk. Your credit card information is passed instantly to the Moneris payment gateway and is not stored at McGill. Moneris handles 80% of all credit card transactions processed in Canada. If you cannot pay by credit card, please contact the undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law). The Faculty may issue a fee waiver to a candidate demonstrating significant financial need.

Categories of Applicants

University Applicants

University Applicants

A University applicant to McGill's Faculty of Law must have completed a minimum of two years of full-time university studies (60 credits) at the time of registration. This category includes applicants who, at the time of registration, will have completed more than one year of university studies in addition to a Diploma of Collegial Studies (DCS).

Please note that, while candidates who have completed 60 credits are eligible to apply to the B.C.L./LL.B. program, the strength of the University applicant pool is such that the Faculty rarely admits candidates who will not have completed an undergraduate degree at the time of registration.

Mature Applicants

Mature Applicants

Revision, August 2013. Start of revision.

A Mature applicant is defined as an individual who has interrupted his or her formal education for a minimum of five years. Applicants who qualify as Mature must apply in this category. There is no predetermined number of Mature candidates admitted in a given year. A Mature applicant is normally expected to have completed a Diploma of Collegial Studies (DCS) from a CEGEP or two years (60 credits) of university studies. Mature applicants who are regarded as potentially admissible following a review of their file may be required to attend an interview.

In addition to all official post-secondary transcripts, Mature applicants are required to submit a detailed resumé of their non-academic experience along with letters of reference from persons who are familiar with their academic potential. The candidate should seek to demonstrate his or her ability to meet the demands of law studies, to reason and analyze, and to express him/herself well both orally and in writing.

Revision, August 2013. End of revision.

CEGEP and Quebec French Baccalaureate (Collège international Marie de France and Collège Stanislas) Applicants

CEGEP and Quebec French Baccalaureate (Collège international Marie de France and Collège Stanislas) Applicants

Revision, August 2013. Start of revision.

Candidates may apply on the basis of a Diploma of Collegial Studies (DCS) from a CEGEP, or a Quebec French Baccalaureate (QFB). This category includes candidates who will have completed up to one year of university studies in addition to the DCS or QFB at the time of registration.

Revision, August 2013. End of revision.

Candidates who will have completed a French Baccalaureate or an International Baccalaureate Diploma outside the province of Quebec, must have completed a minimum of two years of full-time university studies (60 credits), at the time of registration, to be eligible to apply to our program.

  • CEGEP/QFB candidates are not eligible to apply to the joint degree programs.
  • CEGEP/QFB candidates who are regarded as potentially admissible following review of their file are required to attend an interview.

Advanced Standing Students

Advanced Standing Students

Applicants who hold a law degree from a Canadian or foreign university recognized by McGill must apply for admission to the B.C.L./LL.B. program under the Advanced Standing category, unless applying under the Comité des équivalences category (see Comité des équivalences). There are a limited number of places available for Advanced Standing applicants. Applications are evaluated using the same criteria as applications to the first year of the B.C.L./LL.B. program, with particular attention to performance in law studies.

Successful applicants must complete a minimum of 75 credits at McGill and undertake the integrated B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is not possible to obtain either the B.C.L. or the LL.B. degree on its own. The Associate Dean (Academic) determines equivalences for previous studies.

Note: Advanced Standing candidates applying from the French educational system must have obtained a license (licence en droit) in order to be eligible; candidates holding only a D.E.U.G. are not eligible.

Transfer Students

Transfer Students

Students who have successfully completed at least one year of full-time studies in an undergraduate program at another Canadian law faculty may apply for admission as a Transfer student. There are a limited number of places available for Transfer students. Transfer applications are evaluated according to the criteria for admission to the first year of the B.C.L./LL.B. program. Particular attention is paid to performance in law studies and reasons for requesting a transfer.

Successful transfer applicants must complete a minimum of 75 credits at McGill. The Associate Dean (Academic) determines credit for previous studies. In most cases, Transfer students will be required to take the trans-systemic first-year courses—Contractual Obligations and Extra-Contractual Obligations/Torts—in order to meet McGill’s degree requirements. Candidates will not receive credit for courses in obligations, contract, or tort taken during a first year completed at another faculty.

  • Transfer students should forward transcripts of Winter term results as soon as they become available. Transfer applications cannot be evaluated without these results.
  • Candidates who have completed a certificate in law are not eligible to apply under the Transfer category. These candidates must apply in the category of University, Mature, or CEGEP. Courses completed in a certificate in law program cannot be credited toward a McGill law degree.
  • Students who are not in good standing or who have been required to withdraw at the end of their first year at another Canadian law faculty are not eligible to transfer to McGill.
  • The online application is available from September 1 until November 1 for this category, even though the deadline for submitting an application is May 1. To submit a paper application under this category after November 1, please contact undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Comité des équivalences

Comité des équivalences

The Faculty accepts applications from candidates who hold a law degree from a Canadian or foreign university recognized by McGill and who are seeking to fulfil the requirements of the Comité des équivalences of the Barreau du Québec or of the Chambre des notaires, in order to practice in Quebec. Successful applicants must have the final decision of the Comité des équivalences or the Chambre des notaires in hand at the time of registration.

  • This is a non-degree program: students wishing to obtain the B.C.L./LL.B. degrees should apply under the Advanced Standing Students category.
  • The Faculty does not consider candidates applying to fulfil the requirements of the National Committee on Accreditation.
  • Courses taken by Comité des équivalences / Chambre des notaires students cannot be credited toward a McGill law degree.

Visiting Students (Letters of Permission)

Visiting Students (Letters of Permission)

Students who have completed two years of studies at another law faculty who wish, for academic or personal reasons, to spend a term at McGill may be admitted as a Visiting Student. The Faculty endeavours to accommodate qualified students who are in good standing in their own faculties, where student numbers at McGill permit.

Students from other law faculties who would like to attend McGill as a Visiting Student must apply through the Admissions Office. Their application must include a Letter of Permission from their home university. The Assistant Dean (Student Life and Learning) makes decisions on these applications. Accepted students must arrange their academic program with the Assistant Dean (Student Life and Learning).

  • Courses taken by Visiting Students cannot be credited toward a McGill law degree.

Incoming Exchange Students

Incoming Exchange Students

Students registered in degree programs in law at universities that have an official exchange agreement with McGill University or with the Faculty of Law may apply as Exchange students. In addition, McGill participates in a number of exchange programs through CREPUQ (la Conférence des Recteurs et Principaux des Universités du Québec). McGill's exchange partners are listed on McGill University's website.

Students participating in an exchange must fill out the online application form. There is no application fee for these candidates.

Exchange students are selected and officially nominated by their home universities. Please note that home university internal application deadlines may vary. McGill considers applicants on an individual basis; the minimum entrance requirement is generally a cumulative B average or its equivalent. Decisions on applications for exchange are made by the Assistant Dean (Student Life and Learning). Admission decisions on exchange applications are final; there is no reconsideration process.

The Faculty has a limited number of places for Exchange students, and entrance into courses which have enrolment limits or require the permission of the instructor is not guaranteed.

Note: Courses taken by Exchange students cannot be credited toward a McGill law degree.

Special Students

Special Students

The Faculty will exceptionally permit a limited number of candidates not actively pursuing a law degree to apply as Special Students. Students registered in other universities, and candidates not actively pursuing a university degree, may apply to take certain courses within the Faculty.

Special Student status will be granted to applicants who provide compelling academic or professional reasons for taking law courses and who successfully demonstrate the capacity to undertake the requirements of the requested course(s). Status will be granted only where sufficient course space is available.

Special Students are limited to a maximum of 6 credits per term, and to 12 credits in total.

Important information about this category:

  • McGill students registered in a faculty other than law, who, for exceptional reasons related to their program of study, wish to enrol in a Faculty of Law course, must obtain the permission of the Associate Dean (Academic) and the course instructor. Such students need not fill out the online application. The form “Application to register for law courses for McGill students” is available on the Law Student Affairs Office website.
  • Students registered in other Quebec universities who wish to take certain courses within the Faculty must apply through CREPUQ (la Conférence des Recteurs et Principaux des Universités du Québec). Such students need not fill out the online application.
  • Courses taken by Special Students will not be credited toward a McGill law degree.
  • Students wishing to obtain a McGill law degree and students recently refused admission to a degree program in the Faculty of Law will not be admitted as Special Students.
  • The Faculty does not consider Special Student applications from candidates seeking to fulfil the requirements of the National Committee on Accreditation.

The list of courses offered by the Faculty of Law is available from the Student Affairs Office website under Current courses & registration.

Note: All mandatory undergraduate courses for the B.C.L./LL.B. program (see list below) and graduate courses (600 level) are not open to Special Students:

Application Deadlines for Law Undergraduate Programs

Application Deadlines for Law Undergraduate Programs

The online application is available at the beginning of September. Deadlines vary by category of admission. Applicants must take the time to identify the category in which they must apply. Applicants are responsible for ensuring that the online application is completed by the deadlines indicated below and that all supporting documents are uploaded via Minerva by the deadlines listed below. Applicants who are unable to upload their documents online may send them via post or courier, in which case the documents must be postmarked or delivered on or before their appropriate deadlines listed below.

Note: Where a deadline falls on a weekend or statutory holiday, the effective deadline will be the following business day.

Incomplete applications will not be circulated to the Admissions Committee.

Please refer to Categories of Applicants in order to determine which deadline applies to you.

Applicants to First Year (Fall 2014) Online Application Deadlines Supporting Document Deadlines
University November 1, 2013 November 8, 2013
Mature November 1, 2013 November 8, 2013
CEGEP/Baccalaureate (Collège international Marie de France and Collège Stanislas) March 1, 2014 March 7, 2014
Applicants to Upper Years Online Application Deadlines Supporting Document Deadlines
Advanced Standing (Fall 2014) November 1, 2013 January 15, 2014
Transfer (Fall 2014) May 1, 2014 June 15, 2014
Comité des équivalences (Fall 2014 entrance) May 1, 2014 July 1, 2014
Chambre des notaires (Fall 2014 entrance) May 1, 2014 July 1, 2014
Special (Fall 2014 entrance) August 1, 2014 August 8, 2014
Visiting (Fall 2014 and/or Winter 2015) May 1, 2014 June 15, 2014
Incoming Exchange (Fall 2014 and/or Winter 2015) May 1, 2014 June 15, 2014
Comité des équivalences (Winter 2014 entrance) October 1, 2013 December 1, 2013
Chambre des notaires (Winter 2014 entrance) October 1, 2013 December 1, 2013
Special (Winter 2014 entrance) December 1, 2013 December 8, 2013

Application Supporting Documents

Application Supporting Documents

Applicants may, and are strongly encouraged to, upload supporting documents via Minerva the day after having completed the online application (after having received the acknowledgment notice via email). Not all documents may be uploaded via Minerva. See Uploading supporting documents below.

Supporting documents required for all categories of applicants (unless otherwise indicated):

  • Transcripts
  • Personal Statement
  • Resumé
  • Letters of Reference
  • Letter of permission (Visiting students only)
  • Final decision from the Comité des équivalences of the Barreau du Québec (Comité des équivalences applicants only)
  • Final decision from the Chambre des notaires (Chambre des notaires applicants only)

The Admissions Office will obtain LSAT results directly from the Law School Admission Council for those candidates who have taken, or plan to take, the LSAT.

After completing the online application, candidates must ensure that required supporting documents are uploaded via Minerva (or, if necessary, mailed directly to the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law). Documents sent by mail must be postmarked or delivered on or before the dates listed in Application Deadlines for Law Undergraduate Programs. Documents sent by fax or email will not be accepted, unless specifically indicated in the instructions for document submission. See Letters of Reference.

During peak periods (i.e., close to deadlines), the volume of document intake is extremely high (over 1400 applications yearly) and there may be a delay of up to 48 hours between the receipt of a document and the date on which it is recorded in our information system. Taking this delay into consideration, candidates should contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office only if their file remains incomplete 48 hours past the deadline for supporting documents.

Documents submitted to McGill University in support of an application to be admitted, including, but not limited to transcripts, diplomas, letters of reference, and test scores (in paper or electronic format), become the property of McGill University and will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution.

Uploading supporting documents

Uploading supporting documents

You are strongly encouraged to upload your supporting documents rather than mailing them. Uploading your documents saves you time, effort, and the expense of mailing transcripts and supporting documents to us. It prevents delays normally incurred in the processing of paper documentation, allows you to associate your documents with the correct application and requirement, and assures you that your documents have been received.

Documents that can be uploaded via Minerva Number of uploads allowed
Unofficial transcripts Updated version accepted
Personal statement One
Resumé Updated version accepted
Letter of extenuating circumstance (if applicable) One
Part-time letter (if applicable) One

Please see the instructions for uploading supporting documents. Documents that have been successfully uploaded to an application do not need to be sent by mail.

Mailing supporting documents

Mailing supporting documents

Below is the address for supporting documents, if submitting in person, by mail, or courier:

  • Undergraduate Admissions Office
  • Faculty of Law
  • McGill University
  • New Chancellor Day Hall, Room 418
  • 3644 Peel Street
  • Montreal, Quebec H3A 1W9
  • CANADA

Send your documents in as early as possible. The Admissions Committee only reviews files with complete supporting documents. Only required supporting documents will be added to your file. Please refrain from sending other items, as these will not be considered part of your admission file.

Inquiries about supporting documents should be directed to:

Transcripts

Transcripts

Applicants must submit a complete academic record from all previous university studies, as well as subsequent transcripts that become available from the time of application until the applicant has received the Admissions Committee's final decision.

Applicants have three different ways to submit their transcripts:

Transcripts for studies undertaken in Quebec universities may be submitted electronically via the CREPUQ system. Applicants have to contact the registrar of their home university and ask for this arrangement.

Applicants may and are strongly encouraged to upload all their transcripts via Minerva. Transcripts received in this manner are considered unofficial. Applicants will only be asked for official transcripts (sent to us via the CREPUQ system or by mail in an envelope sealed by the registrar of the issuing institute) if and when offered admission to the program. Our offer of admission will be contingent upon the receipt and verification of these official documents. If you have uploaded unofficial transcripts, you are not required to submit official transcripts until we request them from you.

Page Orientation – Make sure that the scanned document orientation matches the original. For example, transcripts that are printed vertically (portrait) should be scanned so that they appear in the portrait format. Transcripts printed horizontally (landscape) should appear in landscape format.

Note: McGill University reserves the right to require official academic credentials at any time during the admissions process, and rescind any offer of admission made if discrepancies between unofficial and official transcript(s) are found.

If submitting official transcripts, to be considered official these must be submitted in an envelope sealed by the Office of the Registrar of the issuing institution.

  1. CREPUQ transcripts: Applicants need not submit paper-based official transcripts of studies undertaken in Quebec universities to the Admissions Office if these transcripts are submitted electronically via the CREPUQ system. Transcripts submitted via the CREPUQ system are considered official.
  2. McGill transcripts: Applicants need not submit official transcripts of studies at McGill University to the Admissions Office. The Admissions Office obtains these results directly from McGill's Enrolment Services. Applicants who participated in an exchange during their program at McGill must submit a transcript.
  3. Exchange studies transcripts: Applicants must submit transcripts for results in studies carried out while on exchange, unless the marks as well as the credits obtained are already included on transcripts issued by their home university. Exchange programs should be indicated in the University History form of the online application.
  4. Transcripts not in French or English: Transcripts in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by an English or French translation provided either by the school issuing the transcript or by a certified translator.
  5. CEGEP transcripts (Permanent Code): Applicants who are currently, or have been, enrolled at a CEGEP must provide their Permanent Code. Starting mid-October each year, McGill will obtain official CEGEP transcripts electronically from the Government of Quebec. The processing of applications for applicants who are currently, or have been, enrolled at a CEGEP will not take place until a valid Permanent Code is provided.
  6. Quebec French Baccalaureate: Applicants in Quebec French Baccalaureate programs must submit official transcripts.
  7. Winter term transcripts for Transfer students: Transfer students should forward the official transcript of their Winter term results as soon as they become available. Transfer applications cannot be evaluated without these results.
  8. Transcripts will not be returned: Transcripts sent to McGill become the property of the University and will not be returned or forwarded to other institutions.
  9. Law School Data Assembly Service: The Faculty of Law at McGill does not receive transcripts through the Law School Data Assembly Service.
  10. French or English language courses: Applicants should report in the University History form (or the Quebec Collegial Studies from) of the online application any courses taken, outside a degree program, which would contribute to their language competency and submit a transcript or certificate of completion.

Personal Statement

Personal Statement

Applicants must submit a brief essay referred to as a Personal Statement. The following is intended to assist in preparing this document.

What is the purpose of the Personal Statement?

Your Personal Statement allows the Admissions Committee to understand the factors that motivate you to pursue a legal education, the particular meaning that the study of law holds for you, and the reasons for your interest in our program. In addition, your Personal Statement shows the Admissions Committee your writing style, your ability to present your ideas in English and/or French, and your maturity and judgment as shown through your writing.

What is the Admissions Committee looking for in reading your Personal Statement?

Members of the Admissions Committee are interested in what you will bring to the study of law and to our learning community, and how you will benefit from the study of law. They look for indicators of intellectual curiosity, community engagement, political/social insight, leadership skills, ability to work with others, openness to diversity (cultural, linguistic, and otherwise), maturity, judgment, and potential for development through opportunity or adversity. On the latter, you may describe your experience as a member of a minority group, or factors that may have made access to a university education difficult. Also, if you are a Mature category applicant, you should discuss the relevance of your past experiences to your current motivation(s) for the study of law, and the reasons for doing so at this point in your life. Ultimately, and whatever your applicant category, the Personal Statement must be a product of your own reflection. We truly value a wide range of backgrounds, identities, and future aspirations. Whether you wish to become a practising lawyer or you have other ideas about your career path following a legal education, your application, and specifically your Personal Statement, should show thoughtful consideration of your reasons for studying law (at our Faculty in particular).

Practical tips

Before writing, reflect critically on your motivations, your interests, and your convictions, and their connection to our program. The Personal Statement should not be used as a vehicle for narrating or repeating your resumé. Bear in mind that you have a limited amount of writing space; make it count. Be authentic. Be yourself. Don’t be afraid to be original, but don’t overlook the importance of the substance. Finally, ensure that your Personal Statement follows our formatting guidelines and that it has grammatical integrity.

Format

The format of the Personal Statement must adhere to the following basic characteristics:

  • Two pages in length (maximum)
  • Single-spaced
  • Arial or Times New Roman font
  • 12-point font
  • Margins of 1.25 inches
  • Indicate your name and McGill ID (if available) at the top right corner of both pages

Re-application

Candidates who have applied to our Faculty in the past must submit a new Personal Statement with any new application. A Personal Statement submitted in respect of a previous application will not be considered.

Extenuating Circumstances

Extenuating Circumstances

Serious medical or personal difficulties may have had an impact on an applicant's academic performance. If this is the case, the applicant should submit a separate letter and provide supporting documentation as appropriate. To be able to upload a letter of extenuating circumstances via Minerva, applicants must answer “Yes” to the question related to extenuating circumstances in the online application. As opposed to what is indicated in the online application, please note that the review of a file will not be delayed as the Faculty of Law has the same review process regardless of whether an applicant has extenuating circumstances or not.

Format

Format

Indicate your name, McGill ID (indicated in the acknowledgment notice), and the subject of your letter “Extenuating circumstances” in the top right corner of each page.

Resumé

Resumé

Applicants are required to submit a resumé highlighting their:

  • academic background and achievements;
  • work experience;
  • volunteer and community work;
  • extracurricular activities, sports, hobbies, and other significant interests.
Note: It is useful to the Admissions Committee if you indicate the number of hours worked during your studies, as well as the time commitment involved in your volunteer and community activities.

The resumé assists the Admissions Committee in its assessment of a candidate's academic strength, depth of involvement in extracurricular activities, leadership, and time management skills.

Re-application: Candidates who have applied to the Faculty of Law in previous years are required to submit an updated resumé.

Format

Format

Revision, August 2013. Start of revision.

As of September 1, 2013, the resumé is required to be a maximum of two (2) pages (letter size). Applicants should not expect that the Admissions Committee will read beyond two pages.

Please indicate your name and McGill ID (indicated in the acknowledgment notice) in the top right corner of each page.

Revision, August 2013. End of revision.

Letters of Reference

Letters of Reference

Revision, August 2013. Start of revision.

Two (2) letters of reference are required. As of September 1, 2013, the Admissions Committee will not accept additional letters of reference.

Applicants who are students, or who have recently completed programs of study, are expected to provide academic references from current or recent professors or teachers who are familiar with their work. Applicants in the CEGEP and Quebec French Baccalaureate (Collège international Marie de France and Collège Stanislas) category are expected to submit two letters of reference from CEGEP or college professors.

Applicants who are unable to obtain academic references because they are no longer students should submit letters from individuals who are well placed to evaluate the applicant's academic abilities such as critical reading, research, and writing; these may be professional references, but ought to be from a person who is in a supervisory position vis-à-vis the applicant.

Personal references are not helpful.

Note: The Office for admission to the B.C.L./LL.B. program does not contact your referees to solicit their letters.

Requirements

Requirements

The candidate must send a copy of the Reference Letter Instructions [.pdf] to the referees to ensure that the letters of reference meet the formatting requirements set out by the Faculty's Admissions Office. The Law Reference Letter Instructions form is available under Letters of reference.

Letters may be sent electronically by the referee via email.

  • Letters sent by University Career Centres will also be accepted if stated that the letters are confidential.

If on paper, the sealed letter of reference may be given to the applicant directly or be mailed to the Law Admissions Office.

  1. The Admissions Office does not accept letters of reference by fax or by telephone.
  2. Given our strict requirement of two letters of reference:
    1. A candidate should indicate the two chosen referees in the first and second fields of the Referee Information section of the online application.
    2. Only letters from those two referees will be inserted in the candidate’s file.
    3. A candidate who wishes to make a referee substitution may do so until the deadline to submit supporting documents. In such case, please advise the undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Faculty of Law Admissions Office) in writing.

Revision, August 2013. End of revision.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

Applicants are not required to take the LSAT. However, if a candidate has taken or will be taking the LSAT, the score will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee. Applicants who have taken or will be taking the test must report the date(s) of sitting(s) and provide their LSAT identification number in the appropriate places on the application. They must do so irrespective of whether the LSAT may, in their own estimation, strengthen or weaken their candidacy.

Note: Candidates must advise the undergradadmissions [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Faculty of Law Admissions Office) in writing of any change regarding the registration to the LSAT when the change occurs after the submission of the application form. If the candidate is writing the LSAT, the file will be circulated for review by the Admissions Committee only when all pending LSAT results are received.

Consequences of Failure to Disclose

Consequences of Failure to Disclose

The Faculty of Law may revoke an offer of admission or cancel an application at any time for material misrepresentation, including omissions, in an application. Although the LSAT is not a mandatory element in an application for admission, every applicant who has taken or will be taking it must disclose their LSAT information and failure to do so is a material misrepresentation. The Admissions Office conducts random verifications for LSAT scores throughout the admissions process and a systematic verification with respect to candidates who receive an offer of admission. These verifications have, in the past, resulted in the revocation of offers of admission.

Why does the Faculty of Law not require the LSAT?

Why does the Faculty of Law not require the LSAT?

The Faculty of Law is a bilingual learning environment. We believe it would be disadvantageous to the significant proportion of applicants and admitted students who indicate French as a first language to require, as a matter of eligibility, a test that is offered only in English.

Who should take the LSAT?

Who should take the LSAT?

While it is not required, it may nevertheless be advisable for many candidates to consider writing the LSAT. Admission to McGill’s Law program is highly competitive; there are roughly eight times as many applicants as there are available places in the first-year class. Accordingly, candidates are strongly encouraged to apply for admission to a number of faculties of law. Almost all faculties of law outside Quebec (with the exception of the Civil Law program at the University of Ottawa and the French Common Law programs at the University of Moncton and the University of Ottawa) require the LSAT.

The quality of McGill’s applicant pool is exceptionally strong. Among admitted students, the average entering GPA is a 3.7 on a 4.0 scale (about an 84% average). Applicants with academic records below this average GPA or percentile are encouraged to consider writing the LSAT.

When should I write the LSAT?

When should I write the LSAT?

Candidates should write the LSAT by December of the year prior to the year for which they seek admission at the latest. Candidates who register for the December LSAT should be aware that consideration of their file will be delayed until receipt of the score.

Applications from candidates who register for the February LSAT of the year for which they seek admission will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee only when all required elements, including the February LSAT score, are received. Given the passing of several months since the application deadline, candidates who register for the February LSAT risk that, by the time the Committee reviews their application, there will no longer be a place to offer even if the Committee wishes to admit.

Processing of LSAT Results

Processing of LSAT Results

The Admissions Office obtains test results directly from the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). Applicants whose service with the Law School Admissions Council has expired must reactivate their service in order to enable the Admissions Office to obtain their LSAT score.

McGill University does not administer the LSAT. Applicants who wish to register for the LSAT must do so directly with Law School Admission Council.

For additional information, see the LSAT section of our FAQ.

Faculty of Law—2013-2014 (last updated Feb. 26, 2013) (disclaimer)