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International Agriculture (24 credits)

Offered by: Plant Science     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

Revision, August 2011. Start of revision.

This specialization will provide the student with coursework and hands-on experience of techniques and issues related to agriculture in a tropical setting. Theoretical courses on the policies and practice of agriculture in an international context are complemented by participation in one of the international field semesters. Note that there is a selection process for participation in a field semester and that participation entails extra cost. In addition, students should consult the academic adviser for the specialization and carefully review the prerequisites for courses in the field semester and the general requirements for participation, which may be over and above what is required by the student's major.

Specialization Adviser: Professor Humberto Monardes
Academic Adviser: Dr. Julie Major
Macdonald-Stewart Building, Room 2-082
Telephone: 514-398-8380

Required Courses (6 credits)

  • AGEC 442 Economics of International Agricultural Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The course deals with economic aspects of international development with emphasis on the role of food, agriculture and the resource sector in the economy of developing countries. Topics will include world food analysis, development project analysis and policies for sustainable development. Development case studies will be used.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Anwar Naseem (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or AGEC 201 or equivalent
  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Two 2-hour conferences

Complementary Courses (18 credits)

18 credits of complementary courses selected as follows:

3 credits, one of the following:

  • NRSC 340 Global Perspectives on Food (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Issues of community and global change in relation to environment and the production of food. Contrasts between developed and developing countries will highlight impacts of colonialism, political structures, and cultural systems related to gender, class and ethnicity.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisite: A 200-level course in food science, food resources or dietetics, or permission of instructor.
  • NUTR 501 Nutrition in Developing Countries (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : This course will cover the major nutritional problems in developing countries. The focus will be on nutrition and health and emphasize young children and other vulnerable groups. The role of diet and disease for each major nutritional problem will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Grace Marquis (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 lectures and one seminar
    • Prerequisite: For undergraduate students, consent of instructor required
  • PARA 515 Water, Health and Sanitation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : The origin and types of water contaminants including live organisms, infectious agents and chemicals of agricultural and industrial origins. Conventional and new technological developments to eliminate water pollutants. Comparisons of water, health and sanitation between industrialized and developing countries.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Timothy Geary, Gaetan Mario Faubert (Winter)

15 credits, select one of the McGill Field Study Semesters listed below:

African Field Study Semester (Winter)

15 credits selected as follows:

9 credits of courses chosen from the complementary course set offered in the year of participation in the Field Study Semester.

6 credits of required courses as listed below:

  • GEOG 416 Africa South of the Sahara (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : A synthetic overview of physical and cultural geography examining particularly the relation of African peoples to their landscapes, the causes and consequences of environmental changes, and the idea of sustainable development as it applies to African landscapes, resource systems and economies.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Offered in Kenya as part of the African Field Studies semester.
  • NRSC 405 Natural History of East Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Integrated study of African landforms, geologic history, climate, environments, biota, water resources and human influences, fostering a thorough understanding of the East African landscape and its inhabitants. Lectures, discussions on selected topics, use of museum resources and field studies will develop powers of observation, identification and enquiry.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Rodger D Titman (Winter)

    • Corequisite(s): ANTH/GEOG 451, NRSC/BIOL 452
    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken NRSC 300 or GEOG 300. Not open to students taking REDM 405.

Barbados Field Study Semester (Fall)

15 credits selected as follows:

  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Angela Keane (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.
  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.
  • URBP 507 Planning and Infrastructure (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : An exploration of the interrelationship between land-use planning and infrastructure provision, especially water and sewerage. An examination of their policy and regulatory frameworks and other methodology of plan making and evaluation.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Lisa Bornstein (Fall)

    • (8-.5-.5)
    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field study Semester.
  • URBP 520 Globalization: Planning and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Economic and social issues related to planning for sustainable development, with a focus on water. Political and environmental determinants of resource use. Impact of global, regional and local institutions, programs and plans in Barbados and in the field locale in general.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Leroy E Phillip, Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (3-3-3)
    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.

Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester (Summer)

15 credits selected as follows:

  • AEBI 421 Tropical Horticultural Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : A comprehensive survey of the major fruit, vegetable, turf, and ornamental crops grown in Barbados. Effect of cultural practices, environment, pests and pathogens, social and touristic activities, and importation of horticultural produce on local horticulture.

    Terms: Summer 2012

    Instructors: Danielle J Donnelly (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 423, AEBI 425, AEBI 427
    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester
  • AEBI 423 Sustainable Land Use (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Management, preservation, and utilization of forage crops in sustainable tropical environments; examination of their value as livestock feed in terms of nutritional composition and impact on animal performance; land use issues as it pertains to forage and animal production in insular environments.

    Terms: Summer 2012

    Instructors: Philippe Seguin, Arif Mustafa (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 425, AEBI 427
    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester
  • AEBI 425 Tropical Energy and Food (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Tropical biofuel crops, conversion processes and final products, particularly energy and greenhouse gas balances and bionutraceuticals. Topics include effects of process extraction during refining on biofuel economics, the food versus fuel debate and impact of biofuels and bioproducts on tropical agricultural economics.

    Terms: Summer 2012

    Instructors: Donald L Smith, Stan Kubow, Mark Lefsrud (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 423 and AEBI 427.
    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester
  • AEBI 427 Barbados Interdisciplinary Project (6 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The planning of projects and research activities related to tropical food, nutrition, or energy at the local, regional, or national scale in Barbados. Projects and activities designed in consultation with university instructors, government, NGO, or private partners, and prepared by teams of 2-3 students working cooperatively with these mentors.

    Terms: Summer 2012

    Instructors: Danielle J Donnelly (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 423 and AEBI 425
    • Restriction(s): Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester

Panama Field Study Semester (Winter)

15 credits selected as follows:

9 credits of required courses

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 24 hours lecture and 36 hours field work over a 4-week period
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203, and BIOL 215
    • Corequisites: ENVR 451; GEOG 404 and HIST 510 alternating with GEOG 498 and AGRI 550
    • Restriction: location in Panama. Students must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

6 credits of complementary courses

Choose one of the following sets:

  • AGRI 550 Sustained Tropical Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Contrast theory and practice in defining agricultural environmental "challenges" in the Neotropics. Indigenous and appropriate technological means of mitigation. Soil management and erosion, water scarcity, water over-abundance, and water quality. Explore agro-ecosystem protection via field trips and project designs. Institutional context of conservation strategies, NGO links, and public participation.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Kushalappa Ajjamada (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or equivalent; MATH 203 or AEMA 310 or equivalent
    • Restriction: Restricted Enrolment. Location in Panama. Student must be registered for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • HIST 510 Environmental History of Latin America (Field) (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Human-nature interactions over different scales of time in Latin America (with an emphasis on neo-tropical environments) and the application of the historical perspective to contemporary environmental issues, including historiography and methodology; cultures of environmental knowledge.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    • This course will be offered in Panama as part of the Panama Field Studies Semester. Language of instruction is in English but fluency in Spanish is required for the fieldwork component of the class.
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or HISP 210 or equivalent proficiency

OR

  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor
  • GEOG 498 Humans in Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on understanding of inter-relations between humans and neotropical environments represented in Panama. Study of contemporary rural landscapes, their origins, development and change. Impacts of economic growth and inequality, social organization, and politics on natural resource use and environmental degradation. Site visits and field exercises in peasant/colonist, Amerindian, and plantation communities.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Oliver T Coomes (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 6 hours lecture for 4 weeks, 3 hours seminar, 2 hours laboratory, 8 hours conference
    • Restriction: Location in Panama. Student must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203 or equivalents

Revision, August 2011. End of revision.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2011-2012 (last updated Aug. 18, 2011) (disclaimer)