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Major International Agriculture and Food Systems (42 credits)

Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

Revision, August 2011. Start of revision.

This program is directed at students who seek conceptual understanding of the scope of and inter-relationships among the environmental, economic, and socio-cultural factors that shape the nature of developing country food systems as well as scientific competence in the ways in which agriculture can help define sustainable solutions to critical problems defined by food insecurity, malnutrition, poverty, and ecological health. Students will be given general preparation sufficient for participation in project management and policy development together with a foundation adequate both for working alongside a range of development specialists and for subsequent acquisition of specific expertise in components of agricultural and food science. The program couples a common core of scientific and development-related courses and allows students to seek further depth in development-related courses in either the social sciences or natural sciences.

Program Director: Professor Humberto Monardes
Academic Adviser: Dr. Julie Major
Macdonald-Stewart Building, Room 2-082
Telephone: 514-398-8380

Program Prerequisites

Refer to "Faculty Information and Regulations" > "Minimum Credit Requirements", in this publication for prerequisites and minimum credit requirements.

Required Courses (15 credits)

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Kelly Ann Bona (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The field of economics as it relates to the activities of individual consumers, firms and organizations. Emphasis is on the application of economic principles and concepts to everyday decision making and to the analysis of current economic issues.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Thierry Neubert (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Two 2-hour conferences
  • AGRI 493 International Project Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Principles and practice related to management of agriculture, nutrition and environmental projects within an international context. Case-studies and workshops drawing on expertise of development professionals from government and the private sector address techniques and resources for successful planning, implementation and evaluation within a multi-sectoral framework.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Anwar Naseem (Winter)

  • INTD 200 Introduction to International Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Inst for the St of Development (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    International Development : An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of International Development Studies focusing on the theory and practice of development. It examines various approaches to international development, including past and present relationships between developed and underdeveloped societies, and pays particular attention to power and resource distribution globally and within nations.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Karen Elisabeth McAllister, Warren Allmand (Fall)

Complementary Courses (27 credits)

Complementary Course A (3 credits)

One of:

  • AGRI 490 Agri-Food Industry Project (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Interdisciplinary team project in the agri-food industry.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012

    Instructors: Julie Major (Fall) Julie Major (Winter)

  • AGRI 499 Agricultural Development Internship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural & Env.Sc.-Dean (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Supervised internship to provide practical experience working on agricultural issues related to international development. The internship can take many forms, including work in a developing country, for an agency that focuses on international development, or on a research project that aims at solving problems faced by developing populations.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Julie Major (Fall) Julie Major (Winter) Julie Major (Summer)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
    • Students should take this course after having completed four semesters in their undergraduate program. It is the student's responsibility to find an appropriate internship, which must be approved by the instructor before registration is authorized.

Complementary Courses B (9 credits)

  • AEBI 210 Organisms 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The biology of plants and plant-based systems in managed and natural terrestrial environments. The interactions between autotrophs and soil organisms and selected groups of animals with close ecological and evolutionary connections with plants (e.g., herbivores and pollinators) will be explored in lecture and laboratory.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Jaswinder Singh (Fall)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken PLNT 201 or PLNT 211
    • 2 hour lecture and 3 hour lab
  • ANSC 250 Principles of Animal Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Introduction to the scientific principles underlying the livestock and poultry industries. Emphasis will be placed on the breeding, physiology and nutrition of animals raised for the production of food and fibre.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Kevin Wade (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • ENVB 210 The Biophysical Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : With reference to the ecosystems in the St Lawrence lowlands, the principles and processes governing climate-landform-water-soil-vegetation systems and their interactions will be examined in lecture and laboratory. Emphasis on the natural environment as an integrated system.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 210
  • FDSC 200 Introduction to Food Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Food Science & Agr-Chemistry (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Food Science : This course enables one to gain an appreciation of the scope of food science as a discipline. Topics include introductions to chemistry, processing, packaging, analysis, microbiology, product development, sensory evaluation and quality control as they relate to food science.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Frederik R Van de Voort (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures

Streams

Choose either the Natural Science or Social Science stream (9 credits).

Natural Science Stream

Complementary Course C1.1 (3 credits)

  • LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids; enzymes and coenzymes. Introduction to intermediary metabolism.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012

    Instructors: Elias Georges, Armando Jardim, Reza Salavati (Fall) Armando Jardim, Elias Georges, Reza Salavati (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken FDSC 211
    • Co-requisite: FDSC 230

Complementary Course C1.2 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • LSCI 202 Molecular Cell Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Organization and function of intracellular organelles in eukaryotic cells. Mechanisms of membrane transport. Protein sorting and vesicular transport. Cytoskeleton. DNA and chromosome structure. DNA replication. Mechanisms of RNA and protein synthesis. Control of gene expression. Cell cycle and the control of cell division. Mechanisms of cell communication and signal transduction. Apoptosis. Neuronal signaling.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: A Paula Ribeiro, Robin N Beech (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: FDSC 211 or LSCI 211
    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken AEBI 202
  • LSCI 204 Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : The course integrates classical, molecular and population genetics of animals, plants, bacteria and viruses. The aim is to understand the flow of genetic information within a cell, within families and in populations. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving based learning. The laboratory exercises will emphasize the interpretation of genetic experimental data.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Jean-Benoit Charron (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CELL 204.
    • Pre- or Co-requisite: FDSC 211 or LSCI 211

Complementary Course C1.3 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • ANSC 234 Biochemistry 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Metabolism in humans and domestic animals. The chemistry of alimentary digestion, absorption, transport, intermediary metabolism and excretion.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Deborah Martin, Raj Duggavathi (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: FDSC 211 or LSCI 211
  • LSCI 230 Introductory Microbiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : The occurrence and importance of microorganisms (especially bacteria) in the biosphere. Principles governing growth, death and metabolic activities of microorganisms. An introduction to the microbiology of soil, water, plants, food, man and animals.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken MICR 230.

Social Science Stream

Complementary Course C2.1 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • AGEC 430 Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : Examination of North American and international agriculture, food and resource policies, policy instruments, programs and their implications. Economic analysis applied to the principles, procedures and objectives of various policy actions affecting agriculture, and the environment.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: John C Henning (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent
  • AGEC 442 Economics of International Agricultural Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The course deals with economic aspects of international development with emphasis on the role of food, agriculture and the resource sector in the economy of developing countries. Topics will include world food analysis, development project analysis and policies for sustainable development. Development case studies will be used.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Anwar Naseem (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or AGEC 201 or equivalent

Choose two of the following three complementary course sets (6 credits):

Complementary Courses C2.2 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present and Future (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of global change, from the Quaternary Period to the present day involving changes in the physical geography of specific areas. Issues such as climatic change and land degradation will be discussed, with speculations on future environments.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2011-2012 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Jon Unruh, Sarah Turner (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
  • GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course introduces the geography of the world economic system. It describes the spatial distribution of economic activities and examines the factors which influence their changing location. Case studies from both "developed" and "developing" countries will test the different geographical theories presented in lectures.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Sebastien Breau, Geraldine Akman (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
  • NRSC 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Introduction to physical and social environments as factors contributing to the production of human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken GEOG 221.
    • Note: This course is also offered as GEOG 221. Students enrolled in main campus programs register as GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register as NRSC 221.

Complementary Course C2.3 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • ANTH 202 Socio-Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : An introduction to ways of understanding what it means to be human from the perspective of socio-cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to diverse approaches to this question through engagement with a wide range of ethnographic cases.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Edward Kohn (Fall) Ian Kalman (Summer)

    • Fall
  • ANTH 204 Anthropology of Meaning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Through the analysis of language, symbols and cultural constructions of meaning, this course explores how people in different societies make sense of their world, and the ways in which they organise that knowledge, and how ideologies represent the different interests present in a society.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Jerome Rousseau (Winter)

    • Winter
  • ANTH 206 Environment and Culture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Introduction to ecological anthropology, focusing on social and cultural adaptations to different environments, human impact on the environment, cultural constructions of the environment, management of common resources, and conflict over the use of resources.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Peter Rudiak-Gould (Fall)

    • Fall

Complementary Course C2.4 (3 credits)

Choose one of:

  • POLI 243 International Politics of Economic Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to international relations, through examples drawn from international political economy. The emphasis will be on the politics of trade and international monetary relations.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Mark R Brawley (Winter)

    • Note: The field is International Politics.
  • SOCI 210 Sociological Perspectives (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Major theoretical perspectives and research methods in sociology. The linkages of theory and method in various substantive areas including: the family, community and urban life, religion, ethnicity, occupations and stratification, education, and social change.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Steven Rytina (Fall) Matthew Lange (Winter)

  • SOCI 225 Medicine and Health in Modern Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Socio-medical problems and ways in which sociological analysis and research are being used to understand and deal with them. Canadian and Québec problems include: poverty and health; mental illness; aging; death and dying; professionalism; health service organization.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Sarah Berry (Winter)

  • SOCI 234 Population and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introduction to the reciprocal linkages in the social world between population size, structure and dynamics on the one hand, social structure, action and change on the other. An examination of population processes and their relation to the social world.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: John Sandberg (Winter)

  • SOCI 254 Development and Underdevelopment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Competing theories about the causes of underdevelopment in the poor countries. Topics include the impact of geography, the population explosion, culture and national character, economic and sexual inequalities, democracy and dictatorship. Western imperialism and multi-national corporations, reliance on the market, and development through local participation, cooperation, and appropriate technology.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Uli Locher (Fall)

    • Summer

Choose 6 credits from one of the following International Development Studies domains:

Economic Development and Living Standards

Environment Agricultual Resources

Specialization (18-24 credits)

Students must also complete at least one specialization of 18-24 credits. Specializations suggested to be taken with the International Agriculture and Food Systems Major:

- Agriculture and Food Systems (Multidisciplinary)
- Ecological Agriculture
- Health and Nutrition
- International Agriculture

Note: For a complete list of specializations offered for students in the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, refer to "Academic Programs" > "Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences) - B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.)" > "Specializations", in this publication. Consult the Academic Adviser for approval of specializations other than those listed above.

Electives

To meet the minimum credit requirement for the degree.

Revision, August 2011. End of revision.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2011-2012 (last updated Aug. 18, 2011) (disclaimer)