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Minor Interdisciplinary Life Sciences (24 credits)

Offered by: Science     Degree: Bachelor of Science

Program Requirements

The Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Minor will allow students from the earth, physical, math, and computational science areas to broaden their studies with some basic life sciences, health social science, and empirical technological science. The Minor is 24 credits and allows students flexibility in their course selections. Students must take 9 credits from an extensive list of basic life science courses, 3 credits from an extensive list of health and social science courses, and 3 credits from an empirical and technological science list. The remaining 9 credits may be taken from courses listed in any of the three categories.

This Minor is not open to students taking a major, honours, or core science component in the following units: Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, and Physiology.

Interested students should contact the Interdisciplinary Programs Adviser.

Complementary Courses (24 credits)

The 24 credits required for this program must satisfy the following criteria:

At least 18 credits must be new credits that are not used to satisfy any other program.

At least 18 credits must be outside the student's main discipline.

Depth requirement:
at least 6 credits must be at the 300 level or above.

Breadth requirement:
at least 9 credits must be taken from the Basic Life Sciences List,
at least 3 credits from the Health Social Sciences List,
at least 3 credits from the Empirical Science and Technology List.

The remaining 9 credits may be selected from any of the lists.

Basic Life Sciences

At least 9 credits from:

* Students take either ANAT 212 or BIOC 212, but not both.

  • ANAT 212 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : An introductory course describing the biochemistry and molecular biology of selected key functions of animal cells, including: gene expression; mitochondrial production of metabolic energy; cellular communication with the extra-cellular environment; and regulation of cell division.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Thomas Duchaine, Arnim Pause, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

  • ANAT 214 Systemic Human Anatomy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : Introduction to the gross anatomy of the various organ systems of head, neck and trunk regions of the human body. Practical tutorials include studies of prepared specimens, use of the anatomical museum and audio-visual materials. This course is limited in size. Selection of students (other than those requiring the course as part of their program) will be made after the first lecture. (Admission is guaranteed for all students enrolled in programs in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology for which ANAT 214 is a required course.)

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Louis Hermo (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lectures, 2 hours practical tutorial

    • Restriction: Open to students in biological sciences

    • Recommended: to U2 students in Anatomy and Cell Biology

  • ANAT 261 Introduction to Dynamic Histology (4 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : An introduction to light and electron microscopic anatomy in which cell and tissue dynamics will be explored in the principal tissues and organs of the body.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Craig A. Mandato, Carlos R Morales (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures, 2 hours laboratory

    • Must be taken in U1 by students in Anatomy and Cell Biology programs

    • Restriction: Open to students in biological sciences and others by special permission

  • ANAT 262 Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : The architectural, functional and temporal continuity of organelles and the cytoskeleton of mammalian cells is introduced as well as their functional integration in the phenomena of exocytosis, endocytosis, protein trafficking and cell motility and adhesion.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John Presley, Ursula Stochaj, Isabelle Rouiller (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Corequisites: ANAT 212 or BIOC 212 or BIOL 201

    • Restriction: Open to students in biological sciences and others by special permission

  • ANAT 321 Circuitry of the Human Brain (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : This course explores the functional organization of the human brain and spinal cord. The course focuses on how neuronal systems are designed to subserve specific motor, sensory, and cognitive operations.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James Brawer, Samuel David (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hour lectures, 2 hours laboratory/tutorial

    • Prerequisite: at least one 3-credit university level course in biology or psychology

    • Restriction: Open to U3 students only, except for P&OT students.

  • ANAT 365 Cellular Trafficking (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : An intensive study of the processes of protein secretion and cell membrane biogenesis. Emphasis on morphological aspects of the above processes, and on the major techniques which have provided experimental evidence, namely, subcellular fractionation, cytochemistry and quantitative electron microscope radioautography.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Fiona Kay Bedford, Peter Scott McPherson, Philip A Barker (Fall)

  • ANAT 381 Basis of Embryology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : The basic processes of reproduction and embryonic development, such as molecular signaling; cell-cell interaction; differentiation; cell fate determination; genetic and epigenetic control of embryonic development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Makoto Nagano, Barbara F Hales, Hugh Clarke (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hour lectures

    • Prerequisites: ANAT 261, BIOL 202 or permission of instructor

  • BIOC 212 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : An introductory course describing the biochemistry and molecular biology of selected key functions of animal cells, including: gene expression; mitochondrial production of metabolic energy; cellular communication with the extra-cellular environment; and regulation of cell division.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Thomas Duchaine, Arnim Pause, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200

    • Restrictions: A non-terminal course intended to be followed by BIOC 311; BIOC 312 in the U2 year. Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 201 or ANAT 212.

  • BIOC 311 Metabolic Biochemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : The generation of metabolic energy in higher organisms with an emphasis on its regulation at the molecular, cellular and organ level. Chemical concepts and mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis are also emphasized. Included: selected topics in carbohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism; complex lipids and biological membranes; hormonal signal transduction.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Julie St-Pierre, Josee Dostie, Robert Kiss (Fall)

  • BIOC 450 Protein Structure and Function (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : Primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of enzymes. Active site mapping and site-specific mutagenesis of enzymes. Enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis. Multienzyme complexes.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Bhushan Nagar, Matthias Gotte, Isabelle Rouiller (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOC 312 and/or sufficient organic chemistry.

    • Restriction: Intended primarily for students at the U3 level

  • BIOC 458 Membranes and Cellular Signaling (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : An integrated treatment of the properties of biological membranes and of intracellular signaling, including the major role that membranes play in transducing and integrating cellular regulatory signals. Biological membrane organization and dynamics: membrane transport; membrane receptors and their associated effectors; mechanisms of regulation of cell growth, morphology, differentiation and death.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John R Silvius, Chantal Autexier, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

  • BIOL 202 Basic Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to basic principles, and to modern advances, problems and applications in the genetics of higher and lower organisms with examples representative of the biological sciences.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Daniel J Schoen, Mario Chevrette, Tamara Western (Winter) David Dankort, Tamara Western (Summer)

    • Winter, Summer

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking CELL 204.

  • BIOL 300 Molecular Biology of the Gene (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A survey of current knowledge and approaches in the area of regulation of gene expression, post-transcriptional control of gene expression, and signal transduction.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Laura Nilson, Monique Zetka (Fall)

  • BIOL 301 Cell and Molecular Laboratory (4 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to laboratory techniques with a focus on methods used to investigate fundamental questions in modern cell and molecular biology. Techniques including gene cloning, DNA and protein isolation and manipulation are covered, along with functional analysis of genes and proteins, basic bioinformatics, and computer-based experimental design and data analysis.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Nam Sung Moon, Paul Harrison, Huanquan Zheng (Fall) Nam Sung Moon, Paul Harrison, Huanquan Zheng (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter

    • 1 hour lecture and one 6-hour laboratory

    • Prerequisites: PHYS 102 or PHYS 142, BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or ANAT/BIOC 212, and BIOL 202. BIOL 206 recommended.

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOC 300. Requires departmental approval.

    • For approval email anne-marie [dot] sdicu [at] mcgill [dot] ca. Specify your ID number as well as the term and lab day.

  • BIOL 303 Developmental Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A consideration of the fundamental processes and principles operating during embryogenesis. Experimental analyses at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels will be presented and discussed to provide an overall appreciation of developmental phenomena.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Laura Nilson, Yong Rao, Daniel Dufort (Winter)

  • BIOL 306 Neural Basis of Behaviour (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Neural mechanisms of animal behaviour; neuroethology; cellular neurophysiology, integrative networks within nervous systems; neural control of movement; processing of sensory information.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gerald Pollack, Joseph Alan Dent (Fall)

  • BIOL 314 Molecular Biology of Oncogenes (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The genes that cause cancer are altered versions of genes present in normal cells. The origins of these oncogenes, their genetic structure, regulation, and the biochemical properties of the oncogene-encoded proteins will be analyzed in an attempt to understand the origins of human and animal cancers.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Loydie Majewska, Maya Saleh, David Dankort (Fall)

  • BIOL 370 Human Genetics Applied (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A contemporary view of genetic research as applied to human health and well-being.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Roberta M Palmour (Fall)

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

  • CHEM 222 Introductory Organic Chemistry 2 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Modern spectroscopic techniques for structure determination. The chemistry of alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, and amines, with special attention to mechanistic aspects. Special topics.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, James L Gleason (Fall) Karine Auclair, Michel Daoust (Winter) Michel Daoust, Joseph A Schwarcz (Summer)

    • Fall, Winter

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken an equivalent Organic 2 at CEGEP (see McGill University Basic Math and Sciences Equivalence Table at www.mcgill.ca/mathscitable) or who have or are taking CHEM 234.

  • CHEM 302 Introductory Organic Chemistry 3 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Topics covered may include the following: Aromatic compounds, heterocyclic chemistry, sulfur and phosphorus chemistry, organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds, and biomolecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, polypeptides, DNA and RNA.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Masad J Damha (Fall) Hanadi Sleiman (Winter)

    • Fall, Winter

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 112, CHEM 222, or permission of the instructor.

  • CHEM 502 Advanced Bio-Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : This course will cover biologically relevant molecules, particularly nucleic acids, proteins, and their building blocks. In each case, synthesis and biological functions will be discussed. The topics include synthesis of oligonucleotides and peptides; chemistry of phosphates; enzyme structure and function; coenzymes, and enzyme catalysis; polyketides; antiviral and anticancer agents.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Masad J Damha (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 302

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CHEM 402.

  • CHEM 503 Drug Design and Development 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Interdisciplinary course in drug design and development covering combinatorial chemistry, process chemistry, structure-activity relationship, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, mechanisms of action and steps in drug development, and principles and problems in drug design.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: CHEM 302, BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212, or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: U3 and graduate students. Students can register only with permission of coordinators.

  • CHEM 504 Drug Design and Development 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Computational methods used in drug design and discovery including QSAR, docking/scoring, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, QM/MM, library profiling and library design.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 503 and permission of instructor

    • Restriction: U3 and graduate students. Students can register only with permission of coordinators

  • EXMD 401 Physiology and Biochemistry Endocrine Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Medicine (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Experimental Medicine : Offered in conjunction with the Department of Physiology. The course provides a basic knowledge of endocrine systems encompassing biosynthesis, metabolism and physiological actions of hormones. Specific topics covered are hormones of the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenals, thyroids, parathyroids, pancreas, gut and the gonads. The role of hormones and growth factors in pregnancy and fetal development are also discussed.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Coimbatore B Srikant (Winter)

  • MIMM 211 Introductory Microbiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A general treatment of microbiology bearing specifically on the biological properties of microorganisms. Emphasis will be on procaryotic cells. Basic principles of immunology and microbial genetics are also introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Benoit Cousineau, Martin Olivier, Amee Manges (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Corequisite: BIOL 200

  • MIMM 314 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the immune system, antigens, antibodies and lymphocytes. The course will cover the cellular and molecular basis of lymphocyte development and mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in immune responses.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Roger Palfree, Reza Alizadehfar, Ciriaco Piccirillo (Winter)

  • MIMM 323 Microbial Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the composition and structure of microbial cells, the biochemical activities associated with cellular metabolism and how these activities are regulated and coordinated. The course will have a molecular and genetic approach to the study of microbial physiology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gregory T Marczynski, James W Coulton, Bernard Turcotte (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Prerequisite: MIMM 211

  • MIMM 324 Fundamental Virology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the fundamental properties of viruses and their interactions with host cells. Bacteriophages, DNA- and RNA-containing animal viruses, and retroviruses are covered. Emphasis will be on phenomena occurring at the molecular level and on the regulated control of gene expression in virus-infected cells.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Matthias Gotte, Jose Guerreiro Teodoro, Jacques Archambault (Fall)

  • MIMM 387 Applied Microbiology and Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : The ability to select and manipulate genetic material has lead to unprecedented interest in the industrial applications of procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Beginning in the 1970s the introduction of and subsequent refinements to recombinant DNA technology and hybridoma technology transformed the horizons of the biopharmaceutical world. This course will highlight the important events that link basic research to clinical/commercial application of new drugs and chemicals.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert A Murgita, Francois Coutlee, Amir Raz (Winter)

  • MIMM 465 Bacterial Pathogenesis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : Organized by the McGill Centre for the Study of Host Resistance. This course focuses on the interplay of the host and the pathogen. The cellular and molecular basis of the host defense mechanism against infections will be considered in relationship to the virulence factors and evasion strategies used by bacteria to cause disease.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Herve Le-Moual, Martin Olivier, Florence Dzierszinski (Fall)

  • MIMM 466 Viral Pathogenesis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the biological and molecular aspects of viral pathogenesis with emphasis on the human pathogenic viruses including the retroviruses HIV and HTLV-1; herpes viruses; papilloma viruses; hepatitis viruses; and new emerging human viral diseases. These viruses will be discussed in terms of virus multiplication, gene expression virus-induced cytopathic effects and host immune response to infection.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anne Gatignol, Chen Liang, Lorraine E Chalifour (Winter)

  • NSCI 201 Introduction to Neuroscience 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Neuroscience : An introduction to how the nervous system acquires and integrates information and uses it to produce behaviour.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Evan Balaban (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: NSCI 200 or PSYC 211 or permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PSYC 308.

  • NUTR 307 Human Nutrition (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Nutrition in human health and disease from the molecular to the organismal level. Nutrigenomics, the impact of genotype on nutrient metabolism, health and disease risk, and the role of nutrients in metabolic regulation.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Linda J Wykes, Luis Agellon (Fall)

  • PATH 300 Human Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pathology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pathology : Provides a fundamental understanding of the diseases prevalent in North America, for upper level students in the biological sciences. Includes: general responses of cells and organ systems to injury; assessment of individual diseases by relating the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention to the primary biological abnormalities in each disorder.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta (Winter)

  • PHAR 300 Drug Action (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Principles of pharmacology and toxicology. Frequently encountered drugs will be used as a focus to illustrate sites and mechanisms of action, distribution, metabolism, elimination and adverse side effects.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta, Barbara F Hales (Fall)

  • PHAR 301 Drugs and Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : This course further explores the basic principles of pharmacology as illustrated by drugs used in the treatment of disease. Emphasis is placed on drugs used for diseases prevalent in North America.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Barbara F Hales, Paul Clarke, Derek Bowie (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: PHAR 300 or permission of instructor.

  • PHAR 303 Principles of Toxicology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Fundamental mechanisms by which toxic compounds damage a biological system (organelle, cell, organ, organism, ecosystem). Detection and quantification of toxicity and risk/benefit analysis are considered. Selected agents of current risk to human health or the environment are evaluated in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernard Robaire, Barbara F Hales, Edith Zorychta (Winter)

  • PHAR 503 Drug Design and Development 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Chemistry, mechanisms of action and steps in drug development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gregory Miller (Fall)

  • PHAR 504 Drug Design and Development 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Possible untoward effects and reasons for drug (dis)approval.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Dusica Maysinger, Gregory Miller (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisites: PHAR 503, or permission of coordinator

    • Restriction: U3 and graduate students. Students can register only with permission of coordinators.

  • PHGY 209 Mammalian Physiology 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of body fluids, blood, body defense mechanisms, muscle, peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ann Wechsler, Phil Gold, Erik Cook (Fall)

  • PHGY 210 Mammalian Physiology 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, endocrine and renal systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John H White, Ann Wechsler, Anne-Marie Lauzon (Winter)

  • PHGY 311 Channels, Synapses & Hormones (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses on cellular communication in the nervous system and the endocrine system.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ellis Cooper, Ali Haghighi (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 afternoons per term

    • Prerequisite: PHGY 209 or permission of the instructor.

  • PHGY 312 Respiratory, Renal, & Cardiovascular Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses underlying our current understanding of topics in renal, respiratory and cardiovascular functions explored beyond the introductory level.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John W Hanrahan, Jacopo Mortola, Sheldon A Magder (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 Wednesday afternoons per term

    • Prerequisites: PHGY 209 and PHGY 210 or equivalent, PHGY 311 or permission of the instructor

  • PHGY 313 Blood, Gastrointestinal, & Immune Systems Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses underlying our current understanding of topics in immunology, blood and fluids, and gastrointestinal physiology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Julio Martinez Trujillo, Volker Manfred Blank, Russell Jones (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 Wednesday afternoons per term

    • Prerequisites: PHGY 209 and PHGY 210 or equivalent, PHGY 311 or permission of the instructor

  • PHGY 314 Integrative Neuroscience (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses underlying our current understanding of how single neurons and ensembles of neurons encode sensory information, generate movement, and control cognitive functions such as emotion, learning, and memory, during voluntary behaviours.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Douglas Watt, Julio Martinez Trujillo, Melissa Vollrath (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lectures per week

    • Prerequisites: PHGY 209

  • PSYC 211 Introductory Behavioural Neuroscience (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : An introduction to contemporary research on the relationship between brain and behaviour. Topics include learning, memory and cognition, brain damage and neuroplasticity, emotion and motivation, and drug addiction and brain reward circuits. Much of the evidence will be drawn from the experimental literature on research with animals.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Yogita Chudasama (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures

    • Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent

  • PSYC 311 Human Cognition and the Brain (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The course is an introduction to the field studying how human cognitive processes, such as perception, attention, language, learning and memory, planning and organization, are related to brain processes. The material covered is primarily based on studies of the effects of different brain lesions on cognition and studies of brain activity in relation to cognitive processes with modern functional neuroimaging methods.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michalakis Petrides (Fall) Michalakis Petrides (Summer)

    • Fall

    • 2 lectures; 1 conference

  • PSYC 317 Genes and Behaviour (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Focuses on current techniques employed to study which genes influence behaviour, and how they do so.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • PSYC 318 Behavioural Neuroscience 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The physiological bases of motivational states, with respect to feeding, drinking, sexual behavior, drug use, and aggression. Physiological bases of learning and memory.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • PSYC 342 Hormones and Behaviour (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The role of hormones in organization of CNS function, as effectors of behaviour, in expression of behaviours and in mental illness.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jens Pruessner (Winter)

Health Social Science

at least 3 credits from:

  • ANTH 204 Anthropology of Meaning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Through the analysis of language, symbols and cultural constructions of meaning, this course explores how people in different societies make sense of their world, and the ways in which they organise that knowledge, and how ideologies represent the different interests present in a society.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jerome Rousseau (Winter)

    • Winter

  • ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Beliefs and practices concerning sickness and healing are examined in a variety of Western and non-Western settings. Special attention is given to cultural constructions of the body and to theories of disease causation and healing efficacy. Topics include international health, medical pluralism, transcultural psychiatry, and demography.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Margaret Stevenson (Fall)

    • Fall

  • ANTH 302 New Horizons in Medical Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Using recent ethnographies as textual material, this course will cover theoretical and methodological developments in medical anthropology since the early 1990's. Topics include a reconsideration of the relationship between culture and biology, medical pluralism revisited, globalization and health and disease, and social implications of new biomedical technologies.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Tobias Rees (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: ANTH 227

    • Restriction: Anthropology program students.

  • ANTH 314 Psychological Anthropology 01 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : A survey of current theories and methods employed in psychological anthropology. Some areas considered are: cross-cultural studies of socialization and personality development; cultural factors in mental illness; individual adaptations to rapid socio-cultural change.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: Any Anthropology course

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ANTH 214

  • ECON 440 Health Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The organization and performance of Canada's health care system are examined from an economist's perspective. The system is described and its special features analyzed. Much attention is given to the role of government in the system and to financing arrangements for hospital and medical services. Current financial problems are discussed.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Erin Strumpf (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 227 or comparable courses or consent of the instructor

  • GEOG 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course introduced physical and social environments as factors in human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as NRSC 221. Students enrolled in downtown campus programs register in GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register in NRSC 221. In Winter 2011, GEOG221/NRSC 221 will be taught on the downtown campus.

  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Nancy Ross (Winter)

  • HIST 249 Health and the Healer in Western History (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : The natural history of health and disease and the development of the healing arts, from antiquity to the beginning of modern times. The rise of "western" medicine. Health and healing as gradually evolving aspects of society and culture.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Faith Wallis, Thomas Andreas Schlich (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who took HIST 349 prior to Winter 2006.

    • Note: Also available to first-year medical students in their options program.

  • HIST 335 Science and Medicine in Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : The social and intellectual history of science and medicine in Canada, from early exploration, through the rise of learned societies, universities and professional organizations, to World War II.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Elsbeth Anne Heaman (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken HIST 212

  • HIST 350 Science and the Enlightenment (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Explores the relationship between the natural sciences and the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. Examination of works in post-Newtonian science as well as their broader cultural meaning, the history of material practices, the origins of social science, and the role of geography and international context beyond Western Europe.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: HIST 215 or permission of instructor.

  • HIST 381 Colonial Africa: Health/Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : A study of the impact of disease on African societies over the last three centuries. Topics include: the efforts of Africans to control their ecology, and to maintain their own medical traditions; the wider African responses to Western bio-medicine, and the relationship of disease to nutrition, demography, and public health.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • HIST 396 Disease in Africa Since 1960 (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : This course examines the negatives and positives of African health since independence: the rise of new pathogens, especially HIV/AIDS, and the revitalization of old ones, such as drug resistant tuberculosis and malaria. Also examined are the growth of health infrastructure, and international successes such as the eradication of smallpox.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • HIST 424 Gender, Sexuality & Medicine (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Gender, sexuality, and medicine since the colonial era, with a focus on North American experience. Topics will include reproductive medicine (puberty, childbirth, fertility control, menopause), changing perceptions of men's and women's health needs and risks, and ideas about sexual behaviour and identity.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Andrea Tone (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: A 300-level History course in gender, sexuality or medicine or permission of instructor.

  • HIST 447 The Natural History of America (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Examination of the ways in which interpretations of the natural world in the Americas were constructed by European travellers, colonial settlers and others. Emphasis primarily on natural histories of colonial British America, but coverage includes comparison across national and regional boundaries within the early modern Atlantic world.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: HIST 211 or permission of the instructor.

  • HSEL 308 Issues in Women's Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Nursing (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: School of Nursing

    Overview

    Health Science Electives : Exploration of a wide range of topics on the health of women. Topics include use of health care system, poverty, roles, immigration, body image, lesbian health, and violence against women. Additional topics vary by year. A Health Science elective open to students in the Faculties of Arts, Science, and Medicine.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Kimani Daniel (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology or Sociology or permission of the instructor

    • Complementary course for the Women's Studies and Social Studies of Medicine Concentrations

  • HSEL 309 Women's Reproductive Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Nursing (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: School of Nursing

    Overview

    Health Science Electives : Concepts of health and medicalization. Canadian and international perspectives. Topics include contraception, abortion, infertility, menstruation, menopause, new reproductive technologies, prenatal care, childbirth. Additional topics vary by year. A Health Science elective open to students in the Faculties of Arts, Science, and Medicine.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anne Marie Lanctot (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology or Sociology or permission of the instructor

    • Restriction: not open for credit to students who have taken HSEL 308 prior to September 1997

    • Complementary course for the Women's Studies and Social Studies of Medicine Concentrations

  • PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An introductory discussion of central ethical questions (the value of persons, or the relationship of rights and utilities, for example) through the investigation of currently disputed social and political issues. Specific issues to be discussed may include pornography and censorship, affirmative action, civil disobedience, punishment, abortion, and euthanasia.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Andrew Reisner (Winter)

  • PHIL 343 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An investigation of ethical issues as they arise in the practice of medicine (informed consent, e.g.) or in the application of medical technology (in vitro fertilization, euthanasia, e.g.)

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Iwao Hirose (Fall)

  • PHIL 443 Topics in Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • POLI 417 Health Care in Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : This course analyzes the theory and politics of health policy and institutions, comparing provincial models and contextualizing Canadian systems with international perspectives from the U.S. and Europe. Current health reform debates will be explored, particularly those involving federal-provincial relations, sustainable financing and the role of the state in social protection.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Antonia Maioni (Winter)

  • PSYC 215 Social Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The course offers students an overview of the major topics in social psychology. Three levels of analysis are explored beginning with individual processes (e.g., attitudes, attribution), then interpersonal processes (e.g., attraction, communication, love) and finally social influence processes (e.g., conformity, norms, roles, reference groups).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Donald M Taylor (Fall) Michael John L Sullivan (Winter)

  • PSYC 304 Child Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Psychology of children, covering critical issues, theories, biological underpinnings, experimental methods, and findings in perceptual, cognitive, language, emotional, and social development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Jessey Bernstein (Fall)

  • PSYC 333 Personality and Social Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The course builds on and is an extension of Social Psychology (PSYC 215). Traditional approaches to person-situation interactions and a more dynamic approach based on recent research on goals and social cognition.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: John Lydon (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 lectures

    • Prerequisite: PSYC 215

  • PSYC 412 Developmental Psychopathology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Introduction to the field of behavior disorders of childhood and adolescence, including core issues, theoretical and methodological underpinnings, descriptions and discussions of many disorders, clinical and research data, and treatment approaches. Three major assumptions will be woven through the course.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Melanie Dirks (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures; 1 conference

    • Corequisite: PSYC 304 or PSYC 337 or permission of instructor

  • PSYC 413 Cognitive Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : In-depth exploration of cognitive development in infants and children including knowledge representation and processing, conceptual development, language development, and theories and principles of cognitive development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Kristine Onishi (Fall)

  • PSYC 414 Social Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Advanced study of the development of social behaviour and social cognition in children. Topics include: socialization, attachment, aggression, exploration, role taking, communication, family and peer relations, self and person perception. The development of these social processes within the framework of three general theories of development: behaviour genetics, learning, and cognitive-developmental.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • SOCI 225 Medicine and Health in Modern Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Socio-medical problems and ways in which sociological analysis and research are being used to understand and deal with them. Canadian and Québec problems include: poverty and health; mental illness; aging; death and dying; professionalism; health service organization.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sarah Berry (Winter)

  • SOCI 309 Health and Illness (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Health and illness as social rather than purely bio-medical phenomena. Topics include: studies of ill persons, health care occupations and organizations; poverty and health; inequalities in access to and use of health services; recent policies, ideologies, and problems in reform of health services organization.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Amelie Quesnel Vallee (Fall)

  • SOCI 310 Sociology of Mental Disorder (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Data and theories of mental disorders. Transcultural psychiatry, psychiatric epidemiology, stress, labelling, mental health care delivery, the family, positive mental health and the "sick" society in the framework of sociological theories of stratification, organization and social psychology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Giovani Burgos (Fall)

  • SOCI 338 Introduction to Biomedical Knowledge (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : The dynamics of biomedical disciplines and specialties. Social, scientific, political and commercial aspects of biomedical research. The organization of work in clinical and fundamental research and its consequences on the choice of research topics.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • SOCI 365 Health and Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Main concepts and controversies linking health to broader social and economic conditions in low income countries. Topics include the demographic and epidemiological transitions, the health and wealth conundrum, the social determinants of health, health as an economic development strategy, and the impact of the AIDS pandemic.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Shelley Clark (Fall)

  • SOCI 390 Gender and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Key conceptual and substantive issues in gender and health since c1950: stratified medicalization of women's and men's health; social movements in health including the women's health movement; gender inequality in morbidity and mortality; gender, power and control in patient/physician interactions; embodied experience; politics and policies of gender and health.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Sarah Berry (Fall)

  • SOCI 422 Health Care Providers (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Current trends and issues in health and illness. The role of occupations and organizations which define health and illness and organize and provide health care. Topics include: the impact of interprofessional relationships; legitimation of approaches to health and illness; knowledge and belief systems, and the role of power; challenges to traditional providers, and the impact of the consumers' and women's movements.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • SOCI 515 Medicine and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : The sociology of health and illness. Reading in areas of interest, such as: the sociology of illness, health services occupations, organizational settings of health care, the politics of change in national health service systems, and contemporary ethical issues in medical care and research.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Alberto Cambrosio (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: Undergraduate students require permission of instructor

  • SOCI 525 Health Care Systems in Comparative Perspective (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Comparative perspective to illustrate processes involved in the development and evolution of health care systems around the world. Countries examined will represent different welfare state regimes, health care system typologies, levels of development and wealth.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Amelie Quesnel Vallee (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken EPIB 525.

    • Note: This course is cross-listed in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health and in Sociology.

  • SOCI 538 Selected Topics in Sociology of Biomedical Knowledge (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : The seminar will examine recent work in the sociology of biomedical knowledge. It will focus on the technological shaping of biomedical knowledge, i.e., on the impact of new technologies and equipments on the development of biomedical knowledge.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Empirical Science and Technology

At least 3 credits from:

* Students who have already received credit for MATH 324 will NOT receive credit for GEOG 202, MATH 203, PSYC 204, BlOL 373, MATH 204, or PSYC 305.

Credit given for statistics courses is subject to certain restrictions. Students should consult the "Course Overlap" information in the "Course Requirements" section for the Faculty of Science.

  • BIOL 309 Mathematical Models in Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Application of finite difference and differential equations to problems in cell and developmental biology, ecology and physiology. Qualitative, quantitative and graphical techniques are used to analyze mathematical models and to compare theoretical predictions with experimental data.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Leon Glass (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: one year of calculus. An additional course in calculus is recommended

  • BIOL 373 Biometry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Elementary statistical methods in biology. Introduction to the analysis of biological data with emphasis on the assumptions behind statistical tests and models. Use of statistical techniques typically available on computer packages.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Claire Seizilles de Mazancourt, Catherine Potvin (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • COMP 202 Introduction to Computing 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Overview of components of microcomputers, the internet design and implementation of programs using a modern high-level language, an introduction to modular software design and debugging. Programming concepts are illustrated using a variety of application areas.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Mathieu Petitpas, Maja Frydrychowicz (Fall) Maja Frydrychowicz, Daniel Pomerantz (Winter) Daniel Pomerantz (Summer)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: a CEGEP level mathematics course

    • Restrictions: COMP 202 and COMP 208 cannot both be taken for credit. COMP 202 is intended as a general introductory course, while COMP 208 is intended for students interested in scientific computation. COMP 202 cannot be taken for credit with or after COMP 250

  • COMP 364 Computer Tools for Life Sciences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Basic concepts and tools for storing, retrieving, and analyzing large biological data sets: relational databases, on-line databases, structured query language, scripting for automating interaction with databases and data analysis, digital images and movies, advanced topics.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restrictions: Not available to students in Computer Science or Joint Computer Science programs. Not available to students who have taken Comp 208 or Comp 250, or who are taking either of these at the same time.

    • Note: It is recommended that students have already taken a laboratory course (e.g., BIOL 301 Cell and Molecular Laboratory). Topics motivated by biological questions.

  • COMP 462 Computational Biology Methods (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Application of computer science techniques to problems arising in biology and medicine, techniques for modeling evolution, aligning molecular sequences, predicting structure of a molecule and other problems from computational biology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Jerome Waldispuhl (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisites: COMP 251 and MATH 323

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken COMP 562. Not open to students who are taking or have taken COMP 561.

  • GEOG 202 Statistics and Spatial Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Exploratory data analysis, univariate descriptive and inferential statistics, non-parametric statistics, correlation and simple regression. Problems associated with analysing spatial data such as the 'modifiable areal unit problem' and spatial autocorrelation. Statistics measuring spatial pattern in point, line and polygon data.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lea Berrang Ford (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2.5 hours and lab

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Abbas Khalili Mahmoudabadi, Jose Andres Correa (Fall)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transfercredits/ for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

  • MATH 204 Principles of Statistics 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : The concept of degrees of freedom and the analysis of variability. Planning of experiments. Experimental designs. Polynomial and multiple regressions. Statistical computer packages (no previous computing experience is needed). General statistical procedures requiring few assumptions about the probability model.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent. No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • MATH 323 Probability (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Sample space, events, conditional probability, independence of events, Bayes' Theorem. Basic combinatorial probability, random variables, discrete and continuous univariate and multivariate distributions. Independence of random variables. Inequalities, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorem.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: William J Anderson (Fall) Vahid Partovi Nia (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: MATH 141 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: Intended for students in Science, Engineering and related disciplines, who have had differential and integral calculus

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking MATH 356

  • MATH 324 Statistics (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, nonparametric inference, regression, Bayesian inference.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Masoud Asgharian-Dastenaei (Fall) William J Anderson (Winter)

    • Fall and Winter

    • Prerequisite: MATH 323 or equivalent

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking MATH 357

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • PSYC 204 Introduction to Psychological Statistics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The statistical analysis of research data; frequency distributions; graphic representation; measures of central tendency and variability; elementary sampling theory and tests of significance.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Rhonda N Amsel (Fall) David J Ostry (Winter) Shahin Zangenehpour (Summer)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have passed a CEGEP statistics course(s) with a minimum grade of 75%: Mathematics 201-307 or 201-337 or equivalent or the combination of Quantitative Methods 300 with Mathematics 300

    • This course is a prerequisite for PSYC 305, PSYC 406, PSYC 310, PSYC 336

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • PSYC 305 Statistics for Experimental Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : An introduction to the design and analysis of experiments, including analysis of variance, planned and post hoc tests and a comparison of anova to correlational analysis.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Rhonda N Amsel (Fall) Heungsun Hwang (Winter) Rhonda N Amsel (Summer)

    • Prerequisite: PSYC 204 or equivalent

    • This course is required of all students who propose to enter an Honours or Major program in Psychology

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

Faculty of Science—2010-2011 (last updated Jan. 19, 2011) (disclaimer)