Feedback

Note: This is the 20102011 edition of the eCalendar. For the most recent publication, click here.  

Minor Environment (18 credits)

Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

This 18-credit Minor is intended for Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Science students and Faculty of Science students, but is open to students from other faculties as well, except Arts and Law.

Advising Note:

Consultation with the Program Adviser for approval of course selection to meet program requirements is obligatory. Only courses at the 200 level and above will be approved.

For information about the Minor in Environment, contact:

Ms. Kathy Roulet, MSE Program Adviser
Email: kathy [dot] roulet [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Telephone: 514-398-4306

Complementary Courses (18 credits)

18 credits of complementary courses are selected as follows:

12 credits of MSE core courses:

Location Note: MSE core courses are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: George McCourt, James W Fyles, Frederic Fabry, Jeanine Rhemtulla, Eyad Hashem Atallah (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Elena Bennett, Mark Purdon, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois, George McCourt, Terry A Wheeler, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, Colin Austin Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Timothy A Johns (Fall) Renee Sieber, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Mariève Isabel (Fall) David Goodin, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Mariève Isabel (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

6 credits of environmentally related courses selected with the approval of the Program Adviser (at least 3 credits must be in social sciences). A list of Suggested Courses is given below.

Suggested Course List

The Suggested Course List is divided into two thematic categories: Social Sciences and Policy; and Natural Sciences and Technology.

Most courses listed at the 300 level and higher have prerequisites. You are urged to prepare your program of study with this in mind.

This list is not meant to be exhaustive. You are also encouraged to examine the course lists of the various domains in the Environment program for other courses that might interest you. Courses not on the Suggested Course list may be included in the Minor with the permission of the MSE Program Adviser.

Location Note: When planning your schedule and registering for courses, you should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Social Sciences and Policy

* Note: If WILD 415 is taken, 1 additional credit of complementary courses must be taken.

  • AGEC 231 Economic Systems of Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The structure and organization of Canada's agriculture-food system, the operation, financing, linkages, and functions of its components. Focus to be on management of the various components and the entire system, types of problems confronted now and in the future.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Laurence B B Baker (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures

    • Prerequisite: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • AGEC 333 Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The role of resources in the environment, use of resources, and management of economic resources within the firm or organization. Problem-solving, case studies involving private and public decision-making in organizations are utilized.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Paul Thomassin (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • AGEC 430 Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : Examination of North American and international agriculture, food and resource policies, policy instruments, programs and their implications. Economic analysis applied to the principles, procedures and objectives of various policy actions affecting agriculture, and the environment.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John C Henning (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures

    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • AGEC 442 Economics of International Agricultural Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The course deals with economic aspects of international development with emphasis on the role of food, agriculture and the resource sector in the economy of developing countries. Topics will include world food analysis, development project analysis and policies for sustainable development. Development case studies will be used.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anwar Naseem (Winter)

  • AGRI 210 Agro-Ecological History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Introduction to the environmental consequences of agriculture through time, relating the cultural diversity of agronomic practices to regionally varied ecological processes.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • 3 lectures

  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and 1 conference

  • ANTH 206 Environment and Culture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Introduction to ecological anthropology, focusing on social and cultural adaptations to different environments, human impact on the environment, cultural constructions of the environment, management of common resources, and conflict over the use of resources.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Colin Hartley Scott (Fall)

    • Fall

  • ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Processes of developmental change, as they affect small communities in the Third World and in unindustrialized parts of developed countries. Problems of technological change, political integration, population growth, industrialization, urban growth, social services, infrastructure and economic dependency.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Alberto Sanchez (Winter)

    • Winter

  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Colin Hartley Scott (Winter)

  • ANTH 512 Political Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Historical, theoretical and methodological development of political ecology as a field of inquiry on the interactions between society and environment, in the context of conflicts over natural resources.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

  • CIVE 433 Urban Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : The City in History. The planning profession, evolution of planning in North America, Canada and Quebec. Planning theories, the general or master plan, planning processes and techniques, planning and design of residential subdivisions. Local planning issues, housing policies, planning laws.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jose Otero (Winter)

    • (3-1-5)

    • Restriction: Not open to U0 and U1 students.

  • ECON 205 An Introduction to Political Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A critical study of the insights to be gained through economic analysis of a number of problems of broad interest. The focus will be on the application of economics to issues of public policy.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Thomas James Velk (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ECON 205D.

    • Restriction: This course does not count for credit towards the Minor Concentration, Major Concentration, or Honours degree in Economics.

  • ECON 225 Economics of the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A study of the application of economic theory to questions of environmental policy. Particular attention will be given to the measurement and regulation of pollution, congestion and waste and other environmental aspects of specific economies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 154-325 or 154-425

  • ECON 326 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic and structural aspects of the ecological crisis. A course in which subjects discussed include the conflict between economic growth and the laws of thermodynamics; the search for alternative economic indicators; the fossil fuels crisis; and "green'' fiscal policy.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Robin Thomas Naylor (Fall)

  • ECON 347 Economics of Climate Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The course focuses on the economic implications of, and problems posed by, predictions of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Attention is given to economic policies such as carbon taxes and tradeable emission permits and to the problems of displacing fossil fuels with new energy technologies.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Isabel Galiana (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above

  • ECON 405 Natural Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Topics include: Malthusian and Ricardian Scarcity; optimal depletion of renewable and non-renewable resources; exploration, risk and industry structure, and current resources, rent and taxation. Current public policies applied to the resource industries, particularly those of a regulatory nature.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert D Cairns (Winter)

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Elena Bennett, Mark Purdon, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Timothy A Johns (Fall) Renee Sieber, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Mariève Isabel (Fall) David Goodin, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Mariève Isabel (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

  • GEOG 200 Geographical Perspectives: World Environmental Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to geography as the study of nature and human beings in a spatial context. An integrated approach to environmental systems and the human organization of them from the viewpoint of spatial relationships and processes. Special attention to environmental problems as a constraint upon Third World development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James Ford (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sarah Turner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course introduces the geography of the world economic system. It describes the spatial distribution of economic activities and examines the factors which influence their changing location. Case studies from both "developed" and "developing" countries will test the different geographical theories presented in lectures.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Sebastien Breau, Geraldine Akman (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course introduced physical and social environments as factors in human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as NRSC 221. Students enrolled in downtown campus programs register in GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register in NRSC 221. In Winter 2011, GEOG221/NRSC 221 will be taught on the downtown campus.

  • GEOG 300 Human Ecology in Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course will examine research approaches in human ecology since its inception early in this century. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical shifts that have led to its emergence as an important social science perspective. The course will also involve case studies to evaluate the methodological utility of the approach.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: George Wenzel (Winter)

  • GEOG 301 Geography of Nunavut (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to the physical and cultural geography of Canada's newest territory. The course will emphasize the bio-physical heterogeneity of the natural environment and the cultural and political ecology of the human population.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: George Wenzel (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 208 or permission of instructor.

  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Nancy Ross (Winter)

  • GEOG 370 Protected Areas (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the goals of protected areas, focusing on the potential conflict between biodiversity conservation and use for recreation, education and sustainable extraction of resources. Principles and current issues in protected area design and management are reviewed. Examples are taken from developed and developing countries.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • GEOG 382 Principles Earth Citizenship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Foundations and applications of earth citizenship. Foundations: sustainability, tragedy of the commons, dominion, privatization and public welfare, resilience, precautionary principle, and land ethic are critically considered. Applications: implications for relationship between human and natural economies; human population size and control; and morality of modern agricultural and forestry practices.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 374. Restricted to U2 or U3 students. Enrolment limited to 50.

  • GEOG 403 Global Health and Environmental Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Major themes and contemporary case studies in global health and environmental change. Focus on understanding global trends in emerging infectious disease from social, biophysical, and geographical perspectives, and critically assessing the health implications of environmental change in different international contexts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lea Berrang Ford (Fall)

  • GEOG 408 Geography of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Examines the geographical dimensions of development policy, specifically the relationships between the process of development and human-induced environmental change. Focuses on environmental sustainability, struggles over resource control, population and poverty, and levels of governance (the role of the state, non-governmental organizations, and local communities).

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Fall)

  • GEOG 410 Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of the cultural, political, and economic mechanisms and manifestations of contemporary underdevelopment and the response to it from different regional and national peripheral societies within the dominant world economic system.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Geraldine Akman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or permission of instructor

  • GEOG 508 Resources, People and Power (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Addresses how different groups of people struggle over natural resources and environmental change. Politics of conservation in resource-dependent local communities, struggles over resource access and character, questions of power, resistance, class, and gender, and to "nature" as a socially-constructed yet active player.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • GEOG 530 Global Land and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Linkage of physical processes (hydrology and ecosystems) with issues of societal and socio-economic relevance (land, food, and water use appropriation for human well-being). Application of a holistic perspective on land, food and water issues in an international setting, highlighting linkages, feedbacks and trade-offs in an Earth system context.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner, Navin Ramankutty (Fall)

  • GEOG 551 Environmental Decisions (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course deals with the role of geographic information, paradigms and modes of analysis - including but not restricted to GIS - in environmental impact assessment and decision making. The focus will be on community-based decision making, particularly where conservation issues are involved. Cross-cultural situations, developing areas and the role of non-government organizations.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 2 hours seminar, 1 hour tutorial

    • Prerequisites: GEOG 302, GEOG 306 or equivalents

  • MGPO 440 Strategies for Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    Management Policy : This course explores the relationship between economic activity, management, and the natural environment. Using readings, discussions and cases, the course will explore the challenges that the goal of sustainable development poses for our existing notions of economic goals, production and consumption practices and the management of organizations.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Margaret Graham (Fall) Margaret Graham (Winter)

    • Restriction: Open to U2, U3 students only

  • NRSC 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Introduction to physical and social environments as factors contributing to the production of human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken GEOG 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as GEOG 221. Students enrolled in main campus programs register as GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register as NRSC 221.

  • NRSC 512 Water: Ethics, Law and Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The various legal expressions of the relationship between humanity and water such as those grounded in markets, basic rights, First Nations traditions, utilitarianism and cost/benefit analysis. Public, private and international law, and intergovernmental institutions relevant to the protection and management of water resources.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Murray Clamen (Fall)

    • Fall

  • NRSC 540 Socio-Cultural Issues in Water (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Discussion of current debates and problems related to water, especially in developing countries. Topics include: gender relations and health in the context of cultural and economic systems, and the impacts of new technologies, market structures and population growth.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: A 300- or 400-level course in water or permission of instructor.

    • 3-hour seminar

  • PHIL 230 Introduction to Moral Philosophy 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A survey of a number of historically important and influential theories. Philosophers to be discussed may include Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Bentham, Mill, and Moore.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Sarah Stroud (Fall)

  • PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An introductory discussion of central ethical questions (the value of persons, or the relationship of rights and utilities, for example) through the investigation of currently disputed social and political issues. Specific issues to be discussed may include pornography and censorship, affirmative action, civil disobedience, punishment, abortion, and euthanasia.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Andrew Reisner (Winter)

  • PHIL 334 Ethical Theory (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A course focusing on central questions in ethical theory such as the nature of the good and the right and the factors which determine moral rightness and wrongness.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sarah Stroud (Winter)

  • PHIL 343 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An investigation of ethical issues as they arise in the practice of medicine (informed consent, e.g.) or in the application of medical technology (in vitro fertilization, euthanasia, e.g.)

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Iwao Hirose (Fall)

  • PHIL 348 Philosophy of Law 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A discussion of the nature of justice and law, and of the relationship between them.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Natalie Stoljar (Fall)

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students with a non-professional interest in law, as well as for those considering law as a profession

  • POLI 211 Comparative Government and Politics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Introduction to the study of comparative politics as it applies both to the developed world and developing countries. The course presents the basic concepts and approaches used in the field of comparative politics and it focuses on patterns of similarity and difference in a way political institutions and processes are structured in a wide variety of national contexts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Filippo Sabetti (Fall)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas.

  • POLI 212 Government and Politics - Developed World (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The nature of politics in a few selected nations of the industrialized world, applying the concepts introduced in POLI 211 to specific national contexts. Countries studied will be drawn principally from Europe and North America.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Hudson Meadwell (Winter)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas.

  • POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to Third World politics. A comparative examination of the legacies of colonialism, the achievement of independence, and contemporary dynamics of political and socio-economic development in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Topics include modernization, dependency, state-building and national integration, revolution, the role of the military, and democratization.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Rex J Brynen (Winter) Theodore David McLauchlin (Summer)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.

  • POLI 345 International Organizations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The politics and processes of global governance in the 21st century, with a special emphasis on the United Nations system.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Vincent Pouliot (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: A basic course in International Politics or written consent of instructor

    • Note: The field is International Politics.

  • POLI 445 International Political Economy: Monetary Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Advanced course in international political economy; the politics of international of monetary relations, such as international rules governing international finance, the reasons for and consequences of financial flows, and the functioning of international financial bodies such as the IMF and World Bank.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Mark R Brawley (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: POLI 243 or permission of the instructor.

    • Note: The field is International Politics.

  • POLI 466 Public Policy Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The principal intellectual traditions in the study of public policy and their application to the policy process in North America and Western Europe. Criteria for evaluation, constitutional choice and governmental process, the role of political influence in policy making and implementation and the problem of change in post-industrial societies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Note: The field is Comparative Politics in Developed Areas.

  • PSYC 215 Social Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The course offers students an overview of the major topics in social psychology. Three levels of analysis are explored beginning with individual processes (e.g., attitudes, attribution), then interpersonal processes (e.g., attraction, communication, love) and finally social influence processes (e.g., conformity, norms, roles, reference groups).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Donald M Taylor (Fall) Michael John L Sullivan (Winter)

  • RELG 270 Religious Ethics and the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Religious Studies)

    Administered by: Faculty of Arts

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Environmental potential of various religious traditions and secular perspectives, including animal rights, ecofeminism, and deep ecology.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Cory Labrecque (Fall) Cory Labrecque (Winter)

    • Fall: Macdonald Campus (Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue). Winter: Downtown Campus.

  • RELG 340 Religion and the Sciences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Religious Studies)

    Administered by: Faculty of Arts

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Philosophies of science and of religion have created a more positive dialogue on questions of method, symbolism and rationality. Examines key issues (e.g. creation and evolution; objectivity and involvement; determinism and freedom) raised by natural and social sciences, and various possible solutions.

    Terms: Summer 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

  • RELG 370 Religion and Human Rights (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Religious Studies)

    Administered by: Faculty of Arts

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Social justice and human rights issues as key aspects of modem religious ethics. Topics include: the relationship of religion to the modem human rights movement; religious perspectives on the universality of human rights; the scope and limits of religious freedom; conflicts between religion and rights.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jonathan Waind (Winter)

    • Winter

  • RELG 376 Religious Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Religious Studies)

    Administered by: Faculty of Arts

    Overview

    Religious Studies : A discussion of ethical theory will provide the background for an analysis of the relationship between religious world views and moral reason. Attention will be given to the way in which the dominant religious traditions view the exemplars of religious virtue, and to how the virtues exemplified are related to and justified by the faith tradition in which they operate.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Summer

  • SOCI 222 Urban Sociology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Comparative analysis of the process of urbanization in Europe, North America and the Third World; effects of urbanization upon social institutions and individuals; theories of urbanization and urbanism; the Canadian urban system; urban problems in comparative view.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Donald Hinrichs (Winter)

  • SOCI 234 Population and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introduction to the reciprocal linkages in the social world between population size, structure and dynamics on the one hand, social structure, action and change on the other. An examination of population processes and their relation to the social world.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John Sandberg (Winter)

  • SOCI 235 Technology and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : An examination of the extent to which technological developments impose constraints on ways of arranging social relationships in bureaucratic organizations and in the wider society: the compatibility of current social structures with the effective utilization of technology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Michael R Smith (Fall)

  • SOCI 254 Development and Underdevelopment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Competing theories about the causes of underdevelopment in the poor countries. Topics include the impact of geography, the population explosion, culture and national character, economic and sexual inequalities, democracy and dictatorship. Western imperialism and multi-national corporations, reliance on the market, and development through local participation, cooperation, and appropriate technology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Uli Locher (Fall)

    • Summer

  • SOCI 386 Contemporary Social Movements (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : This course will focus on contemporary social movements in Canada, the U.S., and Western Europe, such as the civil rights movement, the women's movement, and the environmental movement. Empirical studies of movements will be used to explore such general issues as how social movements emerge, grow, and decline.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Marc Ancelovici (Winter)

  • URBP 201 Planning the 21st Century City (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : The study of how urban planners respond to the challenges posed by contemporary cities world-wide. Urban problems related to the environment, shelter, transport, human health, livelihoods and governance are addressed; innovative plans to improve cities and city life are analyzed.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lisa Bornstein (Fall)

    • (3-1-5)

  • URBP 506 Environmental Policy and Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Analytical and institutional approaches for understanding and addressing urban and other environmental problems at various scales; characteristics of environmental problems and implications; political-institutional context and policy instruments; risk perception and implications; cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, multiple-objectives approaches, life-cycle analysis; policy implementation issues; case studies.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)

    • Restriction: This course is open to students in U3 and above

  • URBP 530 Urban Environmental Planning (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Urban environmental planning with a focus on sustainability and smart growth. Consideration is given to the tools, techniques and processes that planners use to promote sustainable urban development. Local applications and community initiatives are addressed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Note: Not open to students who have taken URBP 614.

  • WILD 415 Conservation Law (2 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : A study of the various federal, provincial and municipal laws affecting wildlife habitat. Topics include: laws to protect wild birds and animals; the regulation of hunting; legal protection of trees and flowers, sanctuaries, reserves, parks; techniques of acquiring and financing desirable land, property owner rights.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Paul Marcil (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 lectures

Natural Sciences and Technology

*Note: you may take MIMM 211 or LSCI 230 but not both; you may take ENVB 315 or BIOL 432 but not both.

  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250

  • AGRI 435 Soil and Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Management of soil and water systems for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Human health and safety concerns. Water-table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Grant Clark (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

  • ANSC 326 Fundamentals of Population Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Population genetics mechanisms in mammals, birds and plant. Factors influencing gene, genotype, and phenotypic frequencies. Effects of different types of selection, Hardy-Weinberg, linkage and recombination, polymorphisms and heterozygosity, population size, random drift and inbreeding on gene and genotype frequencies. Relationship between quantitative genetic parameters and gene frequencies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: AEMA 310 or equivalent or permission of instructor and CELL 204 or LSCI 204 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

  • ANTH 311 Primate Behaviour and Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Critical evaluation of theories concerning primate behaviour with emphasis on the importance of ecological factors in framing behaviour, including mating behaviour, parent care, social structures, communication, as well as various forms of social interaction such as dominance, territoriality and aggressive expression.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: Any 200 level course in a social or biological science.

  • ARCH 375 Landscape (2 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : Land form, plant life, microclimate; land use and land preservation; elements and methods of landscape design.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Francois P Emond (Fall)

    • (2-2-2)

  • ARCH 377 Energy, Environment and Buildings (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : Exploration of the interrelationship between energy, environment and building. Topics include sustainability, assessment tools, the integrated design process, water conservation, energy conservation, renewable energy, materials and embodied energy, indoor environmental quality, environmental acoustics, and advanced building technology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • (3-0-6)

    • Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of instructor

  • ARCH 378 Site Usage (3 credits)

    Offered by: Architecture (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Architecture : The study of the creation, form and usage of the exterior space generated in various patterns of low-rise housing. Socio-cultural aspects of patterns; exterior space as a logical extension of the living unit; social control of the use of urban and suburban land; comparative model for low-rise housing patterns.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Derek Drummond (Fall)

    • (2-0-7)

    • Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of instructor

  • ATOC 215 Oceans, Weather and Climate (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : Laws of motion, geostrophic wind, gradient wind. General circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, local circulation features. Air-sea interaction, including hurricanes and sea-ice formation, extra-tropical weather systems and fronts, role of the atmosphere and oceans in climate.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Man K Yau (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: ATOC 214

  • BIOL 240 Monteregian Flora (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Field studies of ferns, fern allies, conifers and flowering plants; the use of keys for species identification.

    Terms: Summer 2011

    Instructors: Martin J Lechowicz, Isabelle Aubin (Summer)

    • Summer

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 111 or permission

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 358

    • Note: Taught at the Gault Nature Reserve. Contact instructor for specific dates, logistics: (martin [dot] lechowicz [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Graham Bell, Hans Carl Larsson, Virginie Millien (Winter)

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Frederic Guichard (Fall)

  • BIOL 310 Biodiversity and Ecosystems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecological bases of the natural causes and consequences of current global environmental changes, including how biodiversity and ecosystem processes are defined and measured, how they vary in space and time, how they are affected by physical and biological factors, and how they affect each other and human societies.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Michel Loreau, Claire Seizilles de Mazancourt, Thomas Davies (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • one-day field trip to Mont St-Hilaire

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215; or ENVR 200 and ENVR 202; MATH 112 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor

  • BIOL 342 Marine Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to marine benthic communities. Topics include structure and dynamics of hard and soft bottom communities; bioturbation, feeding strategies and trophodynamics; ecology of seagrass, mangrove and coral reef ecosystems; marine pollution.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • BIOL 418 Freshwater Invertebrate Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The life history and ecology of freshwater invertebrates in lakes, rivers and wetlands; habitat requirements, functional ecology and food web interactions; the role of invertebrates in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems; threats to freshwater diversity.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 215 (or ENVR 200 and ENVR 202) and BIOL 205 or permission of the instructor

    • enrolment limited to 25 students

  • BIOL 432 Limnology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and other inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture; 2 weekends at field station equivalent to 3 hours laboratory per week

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.

    • This course, involving two field weekends, has an additional fee of $225, which includes room and board and transportation. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

  • BIOL 436 Evolution and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Explores the impact that biological evolution and evolutionary thinking have on society. Topics include intelligence, language, race, gender, medicine, genetically modified organisms, politics, and creationism.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • (Fall) (Capped at 25 students)

    • Course instructors will introduce each topic and lead discussion, while an invited lecturer will focus on a particular aspect of that topic.

    • Prerequisite(s): BIOL 304 or permission of the instructor.

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David M Green, Andrew Gonzalez (Fall)

  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Shiv Prasher (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2 hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.

  • BREE 322 Organic Waste Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : An introduction to engineering aspects of handling, storage and treatment of all biological and food industry wastes. Design criteria will be elaborated and related to characteristics of wastes. Physical, chemical and biological treatment systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Susan King (Fall)

    • 2 lectures and one 2-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 322.

  • BREE 518 Bio-Treatment of Wastes (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Special topics concerning control of pollution agents from the agricultural industry; odour control, agricultural waste treatment including biological digestion, flocculants, land disposal and sedimentation, pesticide transport.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • One 3 hour lecture

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 518.

  • BTEC 502 Biotechnology Ethics and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biotechnology : Examination of particular social and ethical challenges posed by modern biotechnology such as benefit sharing, informed consent in the research setting, access to medical care worldwide, environmental safety and biodiversity and the ethical challenges posed by patenting life.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Cory Labrecque (Winter)

    • Restriction: U3 and over.

  • CHEE 230 Environmental Aspects of Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemical Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Chemical Engineering : The impact of urbanization and technology on the environment. Topics include urbanization: causes, effects, land use regulations; transportation technology and environmental implications; environmental impact of energy conversions; energy policy alternatives; formulation of energy and environmental policy; air pollution: sources, effects, control; water pollution: sources, effects, control.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Theodora Alexakis (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

  • CHEM 281 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Basic concepts of electronic structure and molecular bonding will be developed and applied to the understanding of common materials. Acid-base chemistry. Survey of the chemistry of the main group elements. Introduction to coordination and organometallic chemistry.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Audrey Moores-Francois (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisites: CHEM 110 and CHEM 120 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: For Honours and Major Chemistry students

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or plan to take CHEM 201

  • CHEM 462 Green Chemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : New reactions and methods which can be used for the production of chemicals from renewable feedstocks; the use of new environmentally benign solvents, catalysts and reagents; organic reactions in aqueous media and in supercritical carbon dioxide; bio-catalysis and bio-processes.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Chaojun Li (Fall)

  • CIVE 225 Environmental Engineering (4 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Introduction to environmental chemistry; mass balance analyses in engineered and natural systems; water, soil and air pollution characterization and control; water quality parameters; drinking water and wastewater treatment technologies; global climate change: possible causes and effects; risk assessment for pollutant exposure; solid- and hazardous-waste management.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Dominic Frigon (Winter)

  • CIVE 323 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Precipitation, evaporation and transpiration. Streamflow, storage reservoirs. Groundwater hydrology. Morphology of river basins. Statistical analysis in hydrology, stochastic modelling and simulation. Case studies in hydroelectric power development, flood damage mitigation, irrigation and drainage.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Tan Danh Nguyen, Van-Thanh-Van Nguyen (Fall)

  • CIVE 550 Water Resources Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : State-of-the-art water resources management techniques; case studies of their application to Canadian situations; identification of major issues and problem areas; interprovincial and international river basins; implications of development alternatives; institutional arrangements for planning and development of water resources; and, legal and economic aspects.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • (3-0-6)

    • Prerequisite (Undergraduate): CIVE 323 or equivalent

  • ENTO 340 Field Entomology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : A field course and project about arthropod taxonomy, field methods and experimental design in entomology. Includes natural history observation, and experimental approaches to arthropod population and community ecology.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Summer

  • ENVB 210 The Biophysical Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : With reference to the ecosystems in the St Lawrence lowlands, the principles and processes governing climate-landform-water-soil-vegetation systems and their interactions will be examined in lecture and laboratory. Emphasis on the natural environment as an integrated system.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Khosro Mousavi-Torbati, Caroline B Begg (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 210

  • ENVB 301 Meteorology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : The physical processes underlying weather. Topics include: the atmosphere - its properties (structure and motion), and thermodynamics (stability, heat and moisture); clouds and precipitation; air masses and fronts; mid-latitude weather systems and severe weather.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 201

  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Christopher Buddle (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205

  • ENVB 315 Science of Inland Waters (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Nature and history of limnology; divisions of inland waters; properties of fresh water; habitats; zones; nutrient cycles; biota; adaptations; seasonal variation; distributions; pollution; succession and evolution of fresh water environments. Includes field excursions.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 315.

  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or Permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410

  • ENVB 415 Ecosystem Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Through the examination of cases studies presented in a modular format, students will be exposed to a variety of ecosystem processes. Choice of components, interactions and type of management to achieve desired endpoints will be discussed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: George McCourt, James W Fyles, Frederic Fabry, Jeanine Rhemtulla, Eyad Hashem Atallah (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois, George McCourt, Terry A Wheeler, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, Colin Austin Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • EPSC 201 Understanding Planet Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Learn about Earth's origin, its place in the solar system, its internal structure, rocks and minerals, the formation of metal and fossil fuel deposits, and the extinction of dinosaurs. Discover the impact of the volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and mountain chains on Earth's past, present and future. Explore 125 million-year-old Mount Royal.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anthony E Williams-Jones (Fall) Alfonso Mucci (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter

    • 3 hours lectures; afternoon field trips

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking EPSC 233.

  • EPSC 233 Earth and Life History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Interpretation of stratified rocks; history of Earth with special emphasis on the regions of North America; outline of the history of life recorded in fossils.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Galen Halverson (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

  • EPSC 425 Sediments to Sequences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Processes and products of modern and ancient carbonate and siliciclastic depositional environments. Sequence stratigraphy as a tool for studying the fundamental controls (sea level, tectonics, sediment supply, etc.) on stratigraphic architecture.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • EPSC 549 Hydrogeology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Introduction to groundwater flow through porous media. Notions of fluid potential and hydraulic head. Darcy flux and Darcy's Law. Physical properties of porous media and their measurement. Equation of groundwater flow. Flow systems. Hydraulics of pumping and recharging wells. Notions of hydrology. Groundwater quality and contamination. Physical processes of contaminant transport.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jeffrey McKenzie (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures, 1-2 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

  • ESYS 301 Earth System Modelling (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth System Science : Principal concepts of systems modelling related to earth system science and environmental science. Students explore the ideas of state, stability, equilibria, feedbacks, and complexity using simple models.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bruno Tremblay, Navin Ramankutty (Winter)

  • GEOG 200 Geographical Perspectives: World Environmental Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to geography as the study of nature and human beings in a spatial context. An integrated approach to environmental systems and the human organization of them from the viewpoint of spatial relationships and processes. Special attention to environmental problems as a constraint upon Third World development.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James Ford (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 201 Introductory Geo-Information Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to Geographic Information Systems. The systematic management of spatial data. The use and construction of maps. The use of microcomputers and software for mapping and statistical work. Air photo and topographic map analyses.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Renee Sieber, Raja Sengupta (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours and lab

  • GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present and Future (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of global change, from the Quaternary Period to the present day involving changes in the physical geography of specific areas. Issues such as climatic change and land degradation will be discussed, with speculations on future environments.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Gail L Chmura, Meaghan Murphy (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 272 Earth's Changing Surface (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the study of landforms as products of geomorphic and geologic systems acting at and near the Earth's surface. The process geomorphology approach will be used to demonstrate how landforms of different geomorphic settings represent a dynamic balance between forces acting in the environment and the physical properties of materials present.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 308 Principles of Remote Sensing (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : A conceptual view of remote sensing and the underlying physical principles. Covers ground-based, aerial, satellite systems, and the electromagnetic spectrum, from visible to microwave. Emphasis on application of remotely sensed data in geography including land cover change and ecological processes.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Margaret Kalacska (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours and laboratory periods

    • Corequisite(s): GEOG 201

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ATOC 308

  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Scope of climatology, physical, dynamic and applied. The Earth/atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances, governing meteorological processes. Movement and circulation of the atmosphere on a local and global scale. Resulting weather systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • GEOG 372 Running Water Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course focuses on the physical habitat conditions found in streams, rivers, estuaries and deltas. Based on the laws governing flow of water and sediment transport, it emphasizes differences among these environments, in terms of channel form, flow patterns, substrate composition and mode of evolution. Flooding, damming, channelisation, forestry impacts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Michel F Lapointe (Fall)

  • GEOG 470 Wetlands (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of the structure, function and utility of wetlands. Topics include the fluxes of energy and water, wetland biogeochemistry, plant ecology in freshwater and coastal wetlands and wetlands use, conservation and restoration. Field trip(s) are envisaged to illustrate issues covered in class.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Meaghan Murphy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Permission of instructor.

  • LSCI 230 Introductory Microbiology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : The occurrence and importance of microorganisms (especially bacteria) in the biosphere. Principles governing growth, death and metabolic activities of microorganisms. An introduction to the microbiology of soil, water, plants, food, man and animals.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken MICR 230.

  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have successfully completed NRSC 331

  • MIME 308 Social Impact of Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mining & Materials Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Mining & Materials Engineering : Critical examination of the socio-economic costs and benefits of technology, case studies of old engineering works and new technologies. The integration of applied ethics and engineering practice, analysis of basic concepts of technology assessment, the inter-connected processes of risk assessment, management, and communication.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • (3-0-6)

    • Enrolment encouraged by students outside the Faculty of Engineering

  • MIME 320 Extraction of Energy Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mining & Materials Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Mining & Materials Engineering : The extraction of energy resources, i.e. coal, gas, oil and tar sands. After a brief geological review, different extraction techniques for these substances will be discussed. Emphasis on problems such as northern mining and offshore oil extraction with reference to Canadian operations. Transportation and marketing.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Faramarz P Hassani (Fall) Faramarz P Hassani (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)

  • MIMM 211 Introductory Microbiology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A general treatment of microbiology bearing specifically on the biological properties of microorganisms. Emphasis will be on procaryotic cells. Basic principles of immunology and microbial genetics are also introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Benoit Cousineau, Martin Olivier, Amee Manges (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Corequisite: BIOL 200

  • MIMM 314 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the immune system, antigens, antibodies and lymphocytes. The course will cover the cellular and molecular basis of lymphocyte development and mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in immune responses.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Roger Palfree, Reza Alizadehfar, Ciriaco Piccirillo (Winter)

  • MIMM 323 Microbial Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the composition and structure of microbial cells, the biochemical activities associated with cellular metabolism and how these activities are regulated and coordinated. The course will have a molecular and genetic approach to the study of microbial physiology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gregory T Marczynski, James W Coulton, Bernard Turcotte (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Prerequisite: MIMM 211

  • MIMM 324 Fundamental Virology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the fundamental properties of viruses and their interactions with host cells. Bacteriophages, DNA- and RNA-containing animal viruses, and retroviruses are covered. Emphasis will be on phenomena occurring at the molecular level and on the regulated control of gene expression in virus-infected cells.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Matthias Gotte, Jose Guerreiro Teodoro, Jacques Archambault (Fall)

  • NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The environmental contaminants which cause pollution; sources, amounts and transport of pollutants in water, air and soil; waste management.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lyle Whyte, William H Hendershot (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 333

  • NRSC 340 Global Perspectives on Food (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Issues of community and global change in relation to environment and the production of food. Contrasts between developed and developing countries will highlight impacts of colonialism, political structures, and cultural systems related to gender, class and ethnicity.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures

    • Prerequisite: A 200-level course in food science, food resources or dietetics, or permission of instructor.

  • NRSC 384 Field Research Project (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Small group field research project.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Summer

    • Prerequisite: 24 credits of university training in a field relating to the environment, including one course in statistics, AEMA 310, or equivalent, or permission of instructor

  • NRSC 510 Agricultural Micrometeorology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Interaction between plant communities and the atmosphere. The physical processes governing the transfer of heat, mass and momentum as they relate to research and production in agricultural and environmental systems. Experimental techniques for measuring fluxes of heat, water-vapour, CO2 and natural and man-made pollutants.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AEPH 510

  • NRSC 514 Freshwater Ecosystems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Origin, diversity, structure, function and evolution of freshwater ecosystems; fauna, flora and biotic communities of freshwater habitats; indicator organisms; biotic indices; human impact on freshwater ecosystems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David James Lewis (Fall)

    • Fall

  • PARA 410 Environment and Infection (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : Infectious pathogens of humans and animals and their impact on the global environment are considered. The central tenet is that infectious pathogens are environmental risk factors. The course considers their impact on the human condition and juxtaposes the impact of control and treatment measures and environmental change.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Marilyn Scott (Winter)

  • PARA 515 Water, Health and Sanitation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : The origin and types of water contaminants including live organisms, infectious agents and chemicals of agricultural and industrial origins. Conventional and new technological developments to eliminate water pollutants. Comparisons of water, health and sanitation between industrialized and developing countries.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Timothy Geary (Winter)

  • PLNT 304 Biology of Fungi (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : This course describes the various groups of fungi and explores in depth their biology and physiology, their ecological niches and the role in various ecosystems and their benefits and uses in industry and biotechnology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Kushalappa Ajjamada (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

  • PLNT 305 Plant Pathology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : The theory and concepts of plant pathology, including the disease cycle, infection, symptoms, resistance, epidemiology and control. The biology and taxonomy of pathogens will be studied, including fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes. Techniques of inoculation, isolation of pathogens from diseased plants, disease diagnosis and pathogen identification will be demonstrated.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Kushalappa Ajjamada (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

  • PLNT 358 Flowering Plant Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Principles of classification and identification of flowering plants and ferns, with emphasis on 35 major families of flowering plants and the habitats in which they grow.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Marcia J Waterway (Fall)

    • 2 lectures, one 3-hour lab, plus a 4-day field week held the week preceding the start of classes

    • A $50 fee is charged to all students registered in this course, which has a fieldwork component prior to the beginning of classes in August. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, a hand lens, instructional handouts and identification aids. Students who have already received a hand lens may request a reimbursement of a portion of this charge through their department.

    • Prerequisites: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 or ENVR 202 or permission of instructor

  • PLNT 426 Plant Ecophysiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Investigates of the complex interactions between plants and their environment, focusing on the mechanisms underlying plant physiological processes. Plasticity of plants to their ecological environment; topics include phytoremediation, plant stress responses, plant-symbiosis and plant-insect interactions.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jacqueline Bede (Winter)

  • PLNT 430 Plant Disease Epidemiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Concepts and systems approach to plant disease epidemiology. Factors influencing pathogen development in plants. Quantification of disease progress. Modeling the effect of host, pathogen and environment on the rate of disease progress. Plant disease detection methods, forecasting systems and management. Integrated disease management. Projects on modeling and comparative epidemiology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Kushalappa Ajjamada (Winter)

    • Prerequisite(s): PLNT 305 or equivalent

    • Restriction(s): Not recommended for U1 students

    • Graduate students registering for PLNT 636 will attend theory classes of PLNT430 and in addition they will participate in a journal club.

  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.

  • SOIL 300 Geosystems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Interactions between Earth's various geologic systems and how these interactions lead to mineral and rock formation. Geomorphic processes and how various landforms are created by the interactions at the Earth's surface between the various geologic systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: George McCourt (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 200. Restricted to U2 students and above.

  • WILD 410 Wildlife Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Ecological processes and theories in animal populations. Interrelationships among biological processes, biotic and abiotic factors, and life history strategies. Topics include population dynamics, optimization strategies, predation, habitat selection, risks and decision making, and social behaviour. Application of problem-solving approach to wildlife ecology through individual and group work.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • WILD 421 Wildlife Conservation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Study of current controversial issues focusing on wildlife conservation. Topics include: animal rights, exotic species, ecotourism, urban wildlife, multi-use of national parks, harvesting of wildlife, biological controls, and endangered species.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: David M Bird (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 421.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2010-2011 (last updated Jan. 19, 2011) (disclaimer)