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Major Environment - Ecological Determinants of Health - Cellular (63 credits)

Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

The Cellular concentration in this Domain is open only to students in the B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) Major Environment or B.Sc. Major Environment program.

This Domain considers the interface between the environment and human well-being, with particular focus on the triad that ties human health to the environment through the elements of food and infectious agents. Each of these elements is influenced by planned and unplanned environmental disturbances. For example, agricultural practices shift the balance between beneficial and harmful ingredients of food. Use of insecticides presents dilemmas with regard to the environment, economics and human health. The distribution of infectious diseases is influenced by the climatic conditions that permit vectors to coexist with man, by deforestation, by urbanization, and by human interventions ranging from the building of dams to provision of potable water.

In designing interventions that aim to prevent or reduce infectious contaminants in the environment, or to improve food production and nutritional quality, not only is it important to understand methods of intervention, but also to understand social forces that influence how humans respond to such interventions.

Students in the Cellular concentration will explore these interactions in more depth, at a physiological level. Students in the Population concentration will gain a depth of understanding at an ecosystem level that looks at society, land and population health.

Suggested First Year (U1) Courses

For suggestions on courses to take in your first year (U1), you can consult the "MSE Student Handbook 2010-11" available on the MSE website (http://www.mcgill.ca/mse), or contact Ms. Kathy Roulet, the Program Advisor (kathy [dot] roulet [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

Program Requirements

NOTE: Students are required to take a maximum of 31 credits at the 200-level and a minimum of 12 credits at the 400-level or higher in this program. This includes Core and Required courses.

Location Note: When planning your schedule and registering for courses, you would verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Ste. Anne de Bellevue.

Core: Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core Required courses for this program are taught at both McGill's downtown campus and at the Macdonald Campus in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: George McCourt, James W Fyles, Frederic Fabry, Jeanine Rhemtulla, Eyad Hashem Atallah (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Elena Bennett, Mark Purdon, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois, George McCourt, Terry A Wheeler, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, Colin Austin Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Timothy A Johns (Fall) Renee Sieber, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta, Rafael Angel Reyna Hurtado (Fall) Colin Austin Chapman, Raja Sengupta, Ismael Vaccaro, E Joan Marshall (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001

    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051

    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Mariève Isabel (Fall) David Goodin, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Mariève Isabel (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Core: Complementary Course - Senior Research Project (3 credits)

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.

  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Frederic Fabry, George McCourt, Kathryn Roulet (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301

    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.

  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Domain: Required Course (3 credits)

  • PARA 410 Environment and Infection (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : Infectious pathogens of humans and animals and their impact on the global environment are considered. The central tenet is that infectious pathogens are environmental risk factors. The course considers their impact on the human condition and juxtaposes the impact of control and treatment measures and environmental change.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Marilyn Scott (Winter)

Domain: Complementary Courses (39 credits)

39 credits of the Complementary Courses are selected as follows:

21 credits - Fundamentals, 3 credits from each category
12 credits - Human Health, maximum of 3 credits from any one category
6 credits - Natural Environment, maximum of 3 credits from any one category

Fundamentals:

21 credits of Fundamentals, 3 credits from each category.

Health, Society and Environment

* Note: you may take GEOG 221 or NRSC 221 but not both.

  • GEOG 221 Environment and Health (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course introduced physical and social environments as factors in human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as NRSC 221. Students enrolled in downtown campus programs register in GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register in NRSC 221. In Winter 2011, GEOG221/NRSC 221 will be taught on the downtown campus.

  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Nancy Ross (Winter)

  • NRSC 221 Environment and Health (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Introduction to physical and social environments as factors contributing to the production of human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken GEOG 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as GEOG 221. Students enrolled in main campus programs register as GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register as NRSC 221.

  • SOCI 234 Population and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introduction to the reciprocal linkages in the social world between population size, structure and dynamics on the one hand, social structure, action and change on the other. An examination of population processes and their relation to the social world.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John Sandberg (Winter)

  • SOCI 309 Health and Illness (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Health and illness as social rather than purely bio-medical phenomena. Topics include: studies of ill persons, health care occupations and organizations; poverty and health; inequalities in access to and use of health services; recent policies, ideologies, and problems in reform of health services organization.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Amelie Quesnel Vallee (Fall)

Toxicology

  • ANSC 312 Animal Health and Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : An introduction to the pathogenesis and control of diseases in farm animals. Immune response and other protective mechanisms. Implications of animal diseases and drug therapy for product safety and public health.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Vilceu Bordignon (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour conference

  • NUTR 420 Toxicology and Health Risks (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Basic principles of toxicology, health effects of exposure to environmental contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides and radionuclides and ingestion of food toxicants such as food additives and preservatives; natural toxins in plants and marine foods, human health, ecosystem health, safety evaluation, risk assessment, and current Canadian regulations.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • PHAR 303 Principles of Toxicology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Fundamental mechanisms by which toxic compounds damage a biological system (organelle, cell, organ, organism, ecosystem). Detection and quantification of toxicity and risk/benefit analysis are considered. Selected agents of current risk to human health or the environment are evaluated in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernard Robaire, Barbara F Hales, Edith Zorychta (Winter)

Cellular Biology

  • ANSC 234 Biochemistry 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : Metabolism in humans and domestic animals. The chemistry of alimentary digestion, absorption, transport, intermediary metabolism and excretion.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Deborah Martin, Xin Zhao (Winter)

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

  • LSCI 202 Molecular Cell Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Organization and function of intracellular organelles in eukaryotic cells. Mechanisms of membrane transport. Protein sorting and vesicular transport. Cytoskeleton. DNA and chromosome structure. DNA replication. Mechanisms of RNA and protein synthesis. Control of gene expression. Cell cycle and the control of cell division. Mechanisms of cell communication and signal transduction. Apoptosis. Neuronal signaling.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: A Paula Ribeiro, Robin N Beech (Winter)

Genetics

  • BIOL 202 Basic Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to basic principles, and to modern advances, problems and applications in the genetics of higher and lower organisms with examples representative of the biological sciences.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Daniel J Schoen, Mario Chevrette, Tamara Western (Winter) David Dankort, Tamara Western (Summer)

    • Winter, Summer

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking CELL 204.

  • LSCI 204 Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : The course integrates classical, molecular and population genetics of animals, plants, bacteria and viruses. The aim is to understand the flow of genetic information within a cell, within families and in populations. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving based learning. The laboratory exercises will emphasize the interpretation of genetic experimental data.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jean-Benoit Charron (Winter)

Molecular Biology

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids; enzymes and coenzymes. Introduction to intermediary metabolism.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Reza Salavati (Fall) Armando Jardim (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken FDSC 211

    • Co-requisite: FDSC 230

Statistics

One of the following statistics courses or equivalent:

Note: Credit given for statistics courses is subject to certain restrictions. Students in Science should consult the "Course Overlap" information in the "Course Requirements" section for the Faculty of Science.

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Kelly Ann Bona (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Abbas Khalili Mahmoudabadi, Jose Andres Correa (Fall)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transfercredits/ for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

Nutrition

* Note: NUTR 307 - Video conference Downtown and Macdonald campus

Human Health:

12 credits chosen from Human Health, maximum of 3 credits from any one category:

Immunology and Pathogenicity

  • MICR 341 Mechanisms of Pathogenicity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : A study of the means by which bacteria cause disease in animals and humans. Includes response of host to invading bacteria, bacterial attachment and penetration processes, and modes of actions of exotoxins and endotoxins.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • MIMM 314 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the immune system, antigens, antibodies and lymphocytes. The course will cover the cellular and molecular basis of lymphocyte development and mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in immune responses.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Roger Palfree, Reza Alizadehfar, Ciriaco Piccirillo (Winter)

  • PARA 438 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : An in-depth analysis of the principles of cellular and molecular immunology. The emphasis of the course is on host defence against infection and on diseases caused by abnormal immune responses.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Florence Dzierszinski (Fall)

    • 3 lectures per week

    • Prerequisites: AEBI 202 or LSCI 202 or permission of instructor

  • PATH 300 Human Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pathology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pathology : Provides a fundamental understanding of the diseases prevalent in North America, for upper level students in the biological sciences. Includes: general responses of cells and organ systems to injury; assessment of individual diseases by relating the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention to the primary biological abnormalities in each disorder.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta (Winter)

Infectious Disease

  • ANSC 400 Eukaryotic Cells and Viruses (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : The basic principles of molecular biology and the underlying molecular basis for various methodologies in molecular biology are covered. The molecular genetic basis for viral infections and tumorigenesis will be covered as examples of the use of molecular genetic approaches to address biological problems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Zadworny (Winter)

  • MIMM 324 Fundamental Virology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the fundamental properties of viruses and their interactions with host cells. Bacteriophages, DNA- and RNA-containing animal viruses, and retroviruses are covered. Emphasis will be on phenomena occurring at the molecular level and on the regulated control of gene expression in virus-infected cells.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Matthias Gotte, Jose Guerreiro Teodoro, Jacques Archambault (Fall)

  • MIMM 413 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the biology, immunological aspects of host-parasite interactions, pathogenicity, epidemiology and molecular biological aspects of selected parasites of medical importance. Laboratory will consist of a lecture on techniques, demonstrations and practical work.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Zafer Ali Khan, Martin Olivier, John Dalton (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: MIMM 314 or equivalent - ANAT 261 is strongly recommended

  • WILD 424 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Systematics, morphology, biology and ecology of parasitic protozoa, flatworms, roundworms and arthropods with emphasis on economically and medically important species.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Petra Rohrbach (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 424 (formerly ZOOL 424).

Nutrition

  • NUTR 403 Nutrition in Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Sociocultural and economic influences on food choice and behaviour; health promotion and disease prevention through nutrition, particularly in high risk populations; the interaction of changing environment, food availability and quality as they affect health.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Grace Marquis, Katherine Gray-Donald, Grace Egeland Hovda (Fall) Timothy A Johns (Winter)

    • Fall

    • 3 hour conference

    • Prerequisite: NUTR 337

  • NUTR 512 Herbs, Foods and Phytochemicals (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : An overview of the use of herbal medicines and food phytochemicals and the benefits and risks of their consumption. The physiological basis for activity and the assessment of toxicity will be presented. Current practices relating to the regulation, commercialization and promotion of herbs and phytochemicals will be considered.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Timothy A Johns (Fall)

Drugs and Hormones

  • ANSC 424 Metabolic Endocrinology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : A detailed study of the endocrine system and its role in the maintenance of homeostasis in higher vertebrates, including the endocrine regulation of energy balance.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Zadworny (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: ANSC 323

  • PHAR 300 Drug Action (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Principles of pharmacology and toxicology. Frequently encountered drugs will be used as a focus to illustrate sites and mechanisms of action, distribution, metabolism, elimination and adverse side effects.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta, Barbara F Hales (Fall)

Physiology

Natural Environment:

6 credits chosen from the Natural Environment, maximum of 3 credits from any one category:

Hydrology and Climate

  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Angela Keane (Fall)

    • Corequisites: None.

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.

  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Shiv Prasher (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2 hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.

  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Scope of climatology, physical, dynamic and applied. The Earth/atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances, governing meteorological processes. Movement and circulation of the atmosphere on a local and global scale. Resulting weather systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • NRSC 510 Agricultural Micrometeorology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Interaction between plant communities and the atmosphere. The physical processes governing the transfer of heat, mass and momentum as they relate to research and production in agricultural and environmental systems. Experimental techniques for measuring fluxes of heat, water-vapour, CO2 and natural and man-made pollutants.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AEPH 510

Techniques and Management

  • BREE 322 Organic Waste Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : An introduction to engineering aspects of handling, storage and treatment of all biological and food industry wastes. Design criteria will be elaborated and related to characteristics of wastes. Physical, chemical and biological treatment systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Susan King (Fall)

    • 2 lectures and one 2-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 322.

  • CHEE 230 Environmental Aspects of Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemical Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Chemical Engineering : The impact of urbanization and technology on the environment. Topics include urbanization: causes, effects, land use regulations; transportation technology and environmental implications; environmental impact of energy conversions; energy policy alternatives; formulation of energy and environmental policy; air pollution: sources, effects, control; water pollution: sources, effects, control.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Theodora Alexakis (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)

  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 208 or permission of instructor.

  • NRSC 437 Assessing Environmental Impact (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Theories and procedures of assessing environmental impact. An examination of the environmental impact of existing programs and projects to examine their accuracy in predicting consequences and attenuating undesirable effects.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 437

    • Restrictions: U2 students and above

  • URBP 507 Planning and Infrastructure (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : An exploration of the interrelationship between land-use planning and infrastructure provision, especially water and sewerage. An examination of their policy and regulatory frameworks and other methodology of plan making and evaluation.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lisa Bornstein, Brenda Lee, Ricardo L Duenez (Fall)

    • (8-.5-.5)

    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field study Semester.

Pest Management

* Note: you may take BIOL 350 or ENTO 350 but not both.

  • BIOL 350 Insect Biology and Control (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to insect structure, physiology, biochemistry, development, systematics, evolution, ecology and control. Stress on interrelationships and integrated pest control.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENTO 330 or ENTO 350.

    • Note: This course is also offered as ENTO 350 in the winter term.

  • ENTO 350 Insect Biology and Control (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Introduction to insect structure, physiology, biochemistry, development, systematics, evolution, ecology and control. Stress on interrelationships and integrated pest control.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENTO 330 or BIOL 350

    • Note: Offered on the downtown campus. This course is also offered as BIOL 350 in the Fall term.

  • ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Modern concepts of integrated control techniques and principles of insect pest management, with emphasis on biological control (use of predators, parasites and pathogens against pest insects), population monitoring, and manipulation of environmental, behavioral and physiological factors in the pest's way of life. Physical, cultural, and genetic controls and an introduction to the use of non-toxic biochemical controls (attractants, repellents, pheromones, antimetabolites).

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy, Guy Boivin (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have previously taken ENTO 452

    • 3 lectures

Pollution Control and Management

  • BREE 518 Bio-Treatment of Wastes (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Special topics concerning control of pollution agents from the agricultural industry; odour control, agricultural waste treatment including biological digestion, flocculants, land disposal and sedimentation, pesticide transport.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • One 3 hour lecture

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 518.

  • NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The environmental contaminants which cause pollution; sources, amounts and transport of pollutants in water, air and soil; waste management.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lyle Whyte, William H Hendershot (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 333

Ecology

* Note: you may take ENVR 540 or BIOL 540 but not both.

  • BIOL 432 Limnology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and other inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture; 2 weekends at field station equivalent to 3 hours laboratory per week

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.

    • This course, involving two field weekends, has an additional fee of $225, which includes room and board and transportation. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David M Green, Andrew Gonzalez (Fall)

  • BIOL 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to U1 or U2 students

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken ENVR 540.

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or Permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410

  • ENVR 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor.

    • Restrictions: Not open to U1 or U2 students. Not open to students who are taking or have taken BIOL 540.

  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have successfully completed NRSC 331

  • PLNT 304 Biology of Fungi (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : This course describes the various groups of fungi and explores in depth their biology and physiology, their ecological niches and the role in various ecosystems and their benefits and uses in industry and biotechnology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Kushalappa Ajjamada (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.

  • WILD 410 Wildlife Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Ecological processes and theories in animal populations. Interrelationships among biological processes, biotic and abiotic factors, and life history strategies. Topics include population dynamics, optimization strategies, predation, habitat selection, risks and decision making, and social behaviour. Application of problem-solving approach to wildlife ecology through individual and group work.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2010-2011 (last updated Jan. 19, 2011) (disclaimer)