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Minor Concentration Science for Arts Students (18 credits)

Offered by: Biology     Degree: Bachelor of Arts

Program Requirements

Freshman students interested in this Minor Concentration should seek advice at the earliest opportunity, either through the Freshman Advisers or by contacting the Program Director. In general, students should declare their intention to obtain this Minor Concentration during their U1 year and consult the Program Director regarding approval of courses to meet the requirements.

THIS MINOR PROGRAM IS IN THE MIDST OF UNDERGOING CHANGES. STUDENTS SHOULD SPEAK WITH AN ADVISER BEFORE BEGINNING THE PROGRAM.
Note: 100-level courses are not counted towards the program requirements in Arts.

Students select one of the following disciplinary areas as their area of specialization for the program:

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Biochemistry
Biology - Cell and Molecular Stream, Organismal Stream
Chemistry
Computer Science
Earth and Planetary Science
Geography
Mathematics and Statistics
Microbiology and Immunology
Pathology
Physics
Physiology
Psychology

This Minor Concentration is administered by the Department of Biology. For more information contact the Biology adviser, Nancy Nelson, in Room W4/13, Stewart Biology Building, 514-398-4109; or the Program Director, Professor Louis Lefebvre, Room W6/10, Stewart Biology Building, 514-398-6457.

Required Course (3 credits)

  • BIOL 210 Perspectives of Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course is an introduction to the thinking, language and practices of scientists. Its objective is to bridge the gap between science and the humanities, and in particular to allow students enrolled in the Minor Concentration in Science for Arts to pursue their interests in specific scientific disciplines.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Louis Lefebvre (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

Complementary Component (15 credits)

15 credits taken in one of the disciplinary areas given below. Where suggested courses have prerequisites at the 200- or 300-level associated with them, credit for the associated prerequisites may also be counted as part of the 15 credits.

Prerequisites at the 100-level cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration.

With the prior written approval of the Program Director, an appropriate alternative set of courses may be substituted.

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Students should note that MATH 133 (or its CEGEP equivalent) is not essential as a prerequisite for these courses.

In consultation with the Program Advisor or Director, students select courses from the list below and other appropriate courses in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences to total 15 credits for the area.

  • ATOC 181 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : A survey of the Earth's atmosphere, weather and climate system. Topics include the fundamental processes that determine interactions between the atmosphere, ocean and biosphere; anthropogenic effects such as global warming, the ozone hole and acid rain; a perspective on future climate change.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: William Henson (Fall) Parisa A Ariya (Winter)

    • Fall and Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ATOC 210 or ATOC 214.

  • ATOC 182 Introduction to Oceanic Sciences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : Air-sea interaction; oceanic properties; global climate change, carbon cycle; polar oceans, sea ice, polynyas; El Niño; remote sensing of oceans; physical control of biological processes in the sea.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • ATOC 214 Introduction: Physics of the Atmosphere (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : An introduction to physical meteorology designed for students in the physical sciences. Topics include: composition of the atmosphere; heat transfer; the upper atmosphere; atmospheric optics; formation of clouds and precipitation; instability; adiabatic charts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Eyad Hashem Atallah, John Richard Gyakum (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: CEGEP Physics

  • ATOC 215 Oceans, Weather and Climate (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : Laws of motion, geostrophic wind, gradient wind. General circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, local circulation features. Air-sea interaction, including hurricanes and sea-ice formation, extra-tropical weather systems and fronts, role of the atmosphere and oceans in climate.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Man K Yau (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: ATOC 214

Biochemistry

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112 plus CHEM 120 (or CHEM 121) or their CEGEP equivalents.

15 credits taken from the following courses and their associated 200- or 300-level prerequisites.

Note:
BIOC 212 has BIOL 200 as its prerequisite.
BIOL 200 has CHEM 212 as its corequisite.

  • ANAT 262 Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : The architectural, functional and temporal continuity of organelles and the cytoskeleton of mammalian cells is introduced as well as their functional integration in the phenomena of exocytosis, endocytosis, protein trafficking and cell motility and adhesion.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John Presley, Ursula Stochaj, Isabelle Rouiller (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Corequisites: ANAT 212 or BIOC 212 or BIOL 201

    • Restriction: Open to students in biological sciences and others by special permission

  • BIOC 212 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : An introductory course describing the biochemistry and molecular biology of selected key functions of animal cells, including: gene expression; mitochondrial production of metabolic energy; cellular communication with the extra-cellular environment; and regulation of cell division.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Thomas Duchaine, Arnim Pause, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200

    • Restrictions: A non-terminal course intended to be followed by BIOC 311; BIOC 312 in the U2 year. Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 201 or ANAT 212.

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

Students who have completed CHEM 212 and CHEM 222 or their CEGEP equivalents may take one or both of the following.

Note:
BIOC 311 has BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212, and CHEM 222 as prerequisites.
BIOC 312 has BIOC 311, BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212 as prerequisites.

  • BIOC 311 Metabolic Biochemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : The generation of metabolic energy in higher organisms with an emphasis on its regulation at the molecular, cellular and organ level. Chemical concepts and mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis are also emphasized. Included: selected topics in carbohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism; complex lipids and biological membranes; hormonal signal transduction.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Julie St-Pierre, Josee Dostie, Robert Kiss (Fall)

  • BIOC 312 Biochemistry of Macromolecules (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : Gene expression from the start of transcription to the synthesis of proteins, their modifications and degradation. Topics covered: purine and pyrimidine metabolism; transcription and its regulation; mRNA processing; translation; targeting of proteins to specific cellular sites; protein glycosylation; protein phosphorylation; protein turn-over; programmed cell death (apoptosis).

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Philip E Branton, Nahum Sonenberg, Kalle Burgess Gehring (Winter)

The courses below are 200-level prerequisites for courses in the above lists.

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

  • CHEM 222 Introductory Organic Chemistry 2 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Modern spectroscopic techniques for structure determination. The chemistry of alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, and amines, with special attention to mechanistic aspects. Special topics.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, James L Gleason (Fall) Karine Auclair, Michel Daoust (Winter) Michel Daoust, Joseph A Schwarcz (Summer)

    • Fall, Winter

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken an equivalent Organic 2 at CEGEP (see McGill University Basic Math and Sciences Equivalence Table at www.mcgill.ca/mathscitable) or who have or are taking CHEM 234.

Biology

Students interested in Biology can choose between two streams. One is oriented toward cell and molecular biology and leads to upper-level courses in developmental biology, human genetics, molecular biology, or allied fields. The other is oriented more toward organismal biology and leads to upper level courses in biodiversity, ecology, sociobiology, neurobiology, behaviour, or conservation biology. See Ms. Nancy Nelson in the Biology Department, Room W4/13, Stewart Biology Building, to arrange a session for counsel on choice of courses above the 200-level.

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112 plus CHEM 120 (or CHEM 121) or their CEGEP equivalents.

Biology - Cell and Molecular Stream

Note: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112 plus CHEM 110, CHEM 120 and CHEM 212 or their CEGEP equivalents are prerequisites for these courses.

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

  • BIOL 202 Basic Genetics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to basic principles, and to modern advances, problems and applications in the genetics of higher and lower organisms with examples representative of the biological sciences.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Daniel J Schoen, Mario Chevrette, Tamara Western (Winter) David Dankort, Tamara Western (Summer)

    • Winter, Summer

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking CELL 204.

Plus a selected subset of these or related upper level courses to complete 15 credits toward the stream.

  • BIOL 300 Molecular Biology of the Gene (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A survey of current knowledge and approaches in the area of regulation of gene expression, post-transcriptional control of gene expression, and signal transduction.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Laura Nilson, Monique Zetka (Fall)

  • BIOL 303 Developmental Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A consideration of the fundamental processes and principles operating during embryogenesis. Experimental analyses at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels will be presented and discussed to provide an overall appreciation of developmental phenomena.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Laura Nilson, Yong Rao, Daniel Dufort (Winter)

  • BIOL 313 Eukaryotic Cell Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Cell biology of eukaryotes focusing on the assembly and function of cellular structures, the regulation of transcription; the dynamics of the cytoskeleton and its motors; mechanics of cell division; cell cycle and checkpoints; nuclear dynamics; chromosome structure and behaviour and experimental techniques.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Monique Zetka, Francesco Fagotto (Winter)

  • BIOL 314 Molecular Biology of Oncogenes (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The genes that cause cancer are altered versions of genes present in normal cells. The origins of these oncogenes, their genetic structure, regulation, and the biochemical properties of the oncogene-encoded proteins will be analyzed in an attempt to understand the origins of human and animal cancers.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Loydie Majewska, Maya Saleh, David Dankort (Fall)

Biology - Organismal Stream

Note: BIOL 111 and 112 plus CHEM 110, CHEM 120 and CHEM 212 plus PHYS 101 (or PHYS 131) and PHYS 102 (or PHYS 142) or their CEGEP equivalents are additional prerequisites for these courses.

  • BIOL 205 Biology of Organisms (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Unified view of form and function in animals and plants. Focus on how the laws of chemistry and physics illuminate biological processes relating to the acquisition of energy and materials and their use in movement, growth, development, reproduction and responses to environmental stress.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Rajinder S Dhindsa (Winter)

  • BIOL 215 Introduction to Ecology and Evolution (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to the fundamental processes of ecology and evolution that bear on the nature and diversity of organisms and the processes that govern their assembly into ecological communities and their roles in ecosystem function.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Neil Price, Hans Carl Larsson, Catherine Potvin (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 111

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ENVR 202

Plus a selected subset of these or related upper-level courses to complete 15 credits toward the stream.

  • BIOL 304 Evolution (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course will show how the theory of evolution by natural selection provides the basis for understanding the whole of biology. The first half of the course describes the process of selection, while the second deals with evolution in the long term.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Graham Bell (Fall)

  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Graham Bell, Hans Carl Larsson, Virginie Millien (Winter)

  • BIOL 306 Neural Basis of Behaviour (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Neural mechanisms of animal behaviour; neuroethology; cellular neurophysiology, integrative networks within nervous systems; neural control of movement; processing of sensory information.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gerald Pollack, Joseph Alan Dent (Fall)

  • BIOL 307 Behavioural Ecology/Sociobiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The relationship between animal behaviour and the natural environment in which it occurs. This course introduces the subject of ecology at the level of the individual organism. Emphasis on general principles which relate to feeding, predator avoidance, aggression, reproduction and parental care of animals including humans.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Louis Lefebvre, Colin Austin Chapman, Jon Sakata (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lecture and 1 hour conference

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 205 and BIOL 215 or permission

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Frederic Guichard (Fall)

  • BIOL 310 Biodiversity and Ecosystems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecological bases of the natural causes and consequences of current global environmental changes, including how biodiversity and ecosystem processes are defined and measured, how they vary in space and time, how they are affected by physical and biological factors, and how they affect each other and human societies.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Michel Loreau, Claire Seizilles de Mazancourt, Thomas Davies (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • one-day field trip to Mont St-Hilaire

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215; or ENVR 200 and ENVR 202; MATH 112 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David M Green, Andrew Gonzalez (Fall)

Chemistry

15 credits of Chemistry

Chemistry courses, with the exception of the World of Chemistry series, require CHEM 110, 120 and CHEM 212 or their CEGEP equivalents. CHEM 110 and CHEM 120 may not be counted toward the program.

The 100-level World of Chemistry series can enrich a concentration in this area but the obligation to take 12 credits at the 200-level or higher remains in force.

The department also strongly encourages students forming a concentration in chemistry to take one or more courses involving a laboratory because the science of chemistry is rooted in laboratory experience.

Only one of the World of Chemistry courses below may be counted toward the program.

  • CHEM 180 World of Chemistry: Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Risks, water, air pollution, sick-building syndrome, the chemistry of the car, energy (fossil fuel, nuclear), nano and biotechnology, smells, garbage and human waste, dental chemistry and green chemistry.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ariel Fenster, David Noble Harpp, Joseph A Schwarcz (Winter)

    • Winter

    • No prerequisites

  • CHEM 181 World of Chemistry: Food (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A series of lectures on the historical, practical, and simple chemical aspects of: food, food additives; vitamins; minerals, diet and cancer; dieting; food-borne illnesses, health food and cooking.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Noble Harpp, Joseph A Schwarcz, Ariel Fenster (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lecture hours/week

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CHEM 150.

  • CHEM 182 World of Chemistry: Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Aspects of chemical technology including publishing of scientific articles, rocketry, space travel, materials (metals, plastics art), household products, forensic science, money, combustion science, computers and cosmetics.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David Noble Harpp, Joseph A Schwarcz, Ariel Fenster (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lecture hours/week

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CHEM 160.

  • CHEM 183 World of Chemistry: Drugs (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Drug history and marketing, over the counter drugs (e.g. aspirin, cough and cold remedies, allergy preparations), street and heart drugs, mental illness, hormones, brain chemistry and diabetes.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David Noble Harpp, Joseph A Schwarcz, Ariel Fenster (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lecture hours/week

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CHEM 170.

Students select 200- and 300-level courses from the lists below. A minimum of 12 credits at the 200-level or higher is required.

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

  • CHEM 222 Introductory Organic Chemistry 2 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Modern spectroscopic techniques for structure determination. The chemistry of alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, and amines, with special attention to mechanistic aspects. Special topics.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, James L Gleason (Fall) Karine Auclair, Michel Daoust (Winter) Michel Daoust, Joseph A Schwarcz (Summer)

    • Fall, Winter

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken an equivalent Organic 2 at CEGEP (see McGill University Basic Math and Sciences Equivalence Table at www.mcgill.ca/mathscitable) or who have or are taking CHEM 234.

  • CHEM 281 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Basic concepts of electronic structure and molecular bonding will be developed and applied to the understanding of common materials. Acid-base chemistry. Survey of the chemistry of the main group elements. Introduction to coordination and organometallic chemistry.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Audrey Moores-Francois (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisites: CHEM 110 and CHEM 120 or equivalent.

    • Restriction: For Honours and Major Chemistry students

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or plan to take CHEM 201

  • CHEM 302 Introductory Organic Chemistry 3 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Topics covered may include the following: Aromatic compounds, heterocyclic chemistry, sulfur and phosphorus chemistry, organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds, and biomolecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, polypeptides, DNA and RNA.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Masad J Damha (Fall) Hanadi Sleiman (Winter)

    • Fall, Winter

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 112, CHEM 222, or permission of the instructor.

  • CHEM 381 Inorganic Chemistry 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Introduction to transition metal chemistry, coordination numbers and geometry, and nomenclature will be followed by a discussion of crystal field theory and its applications to problems in spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics. Several aspects related to applications of organometallic compounds in catalysis and bioinorganic systems will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Bruce A Arndtsen (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: CHEM 281.

    • Restriction: For Honours and Major Chemistry students

One of:

One of:

  • CHEM 307 Analytical Chemistry of Pollutants (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : Description of current analytical practices in air and water pollution; critical evaluation of the reliability of the methods, with particular emphasis on interfering substances; rudiments of automated instrumentation; toxicological analysis as it relates to pollution.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: One course in analytical chemistry

  • CHEM 334 Advanced Materials (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : The physicochemical properties of advanced materials. Topics discussed include photonics, information storage, 'smart' materials, biomaterials, clean energy materials, porous materials, and polymers.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Derek G Gray, Theodorus G Van de Ven (Fall)

Both of:

Computer Science

Students in any Computer Science Minor concentration, Major concentration or Honours program cannot choose this disciplinary area.

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor concentration: MATH 139 or MATH 140, MATH 141, and MATH 133 and COMP 102 or their CEGEP equivalents.

Students select from:

  • COMP 202 Introduction to Computing 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Overview of components of microcomputers, the internet design and implementation of programs using a modern high-level language, an introduction to modular software design and debugging. Programming concepts are illustrated using a variety of application areas.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Mathieu Petitpas, Maja Frydrychowicz (Fall) Maja Frydrychowicz, Daniel Pomerantz (Winter) Daniel Pomerantz (Summer)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: a CEGEP level mathematics course

    • Restrictions: COMP 202 and COMP 208 cannot both be taken for credit. COMP 202 is intended as a general introductory course, while COMP 208 is intended for students interested in scientific computation. COMP 202 cannot be taken for credit with or after COMP 250

  • COMP 203 Introduction to Computing 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Basic data structures. Representation of arrays, stacks, and queues. Linked lists and their applications to binary trees. Internal sorting. Graph representation. Elementary graph algorithms.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisites: MATH 133 and COMP 202

    • Restrictions: COMP 203 and COMP 250 are considered to be equivalent from a prerequisite point of view, and cannot both be taken for credit. Students who are registered in the following programs: Major or Honours in Computer Science, Major in Software Engineering, any of the joint major programs offered through the Faculty of Science and the Major Concentration in Foundations of Computing, in the Faculty of Arts, may not take this course.

  • COMP 250 Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : An introduction to the design of computer algorithms, including basic data structures, analysis of algorithms, and establishing correctness of programs. Overview of topics in computer science.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Doina Precup (Fall) Michael Langer (Winter)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisites: Familiarity with a high level programming language and CEGEP level Math.

    • Restrictions: COMP 203 and COMP 250 are considered to be equivalent from a prerequisite point of view, and cannot both be taken for credit.

  • COMP 251 Data Structures and Algorithms (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Design and analysis of algorithms. Complexity of algorithms. Data structures. Introduction to graph algorithms and their analysis.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Clark Verbrugge (Fall) Claude Crepeau (Winter)

Plus any of the courses below to total 15 credits of Computer Science.

  • COMP 273 Introduction to Computer Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Number representations, combinational and sequential digital circuits, MIPS instructions and architecture datapath and control, caches, virtual memory, interrupts and exceptions, pipelining.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Joseph P Vybihal (Fall) Kaleem Siddiqi (Winter)

  • COMP 302 Programming Languages and Paradigms (3 credits)

    Offered by: Computer Science (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Computer Science (Sci) : Programming language design issues and programming paradigms. Binding and scoping, parameter passing, lambda abstraction, data abstraction, type checking. Functional and logic programming.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Brigitte Pientka (Fall) Jesse Doherty (Winter)

Earth and Planetary Sciences

THIS AREA OF SPECIALIZATION IS UNDER REVISION. INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD SPEAK WITH THE PROGRAM ADVISER ABOUT APPROPRIATE COURSE SELECTION FOR THIS AREA.

A combination of Earth and Planetary Sciences EPSC 210, EPSC 212, and one or more of EPSC 180, EPSC 201, and EPSC 181 provide a grounding in these inter-related disciplines in preparation for more specialized courses. Students should verify all prerequisites as some courses may have additional Science prerequisites, for example MATH 222 is a prerequisite for EPSC 320.

*Note: EPSC 182 and ANAT 182 are double-prefix courses and identical in content.

Students select 15 credits from the list below.

  • ANAT 182 Astrobiology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Anatomy and Cell Biology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Anatomy & Cell Biology : Astrobiology is the search for the origin, evolution and destiny of life in the universe. The course will provide insight into the formation and evolution of habitable worlds, the evolution of life and the biogeochemical cycles in the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, and the potential for biological evolution beyond an organism's planet of origin.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Hojatollah Vali, Andrew J Higgins, Jay Nadeau (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • This is a double-prefix course and is identical in content with EPSC 182.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ANAT 205/EPSC 205 or EPSC 182.

  • EPSC 180 The Terrestrial Planets (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : A comparative survey of the planets of our solar system with an emphasis on the terrestrial planets and their implications for the Earth as a planet. Topics include: structure and origin of the solar system, meteorites, and comparisons of the terrestrial planets in terms of their rotational properties, magnetic fields, atmospheres, surface histories, internal structure, chemical composition, volcanism, and tectonics.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Olivia Jensen (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPSC 200.

  • EPSC 181 Environmental Geology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Introduction to the relationship of geological processes and materials to the human environment; geologic hazards; hydrogeology; impacts of waste disposal, energy use, land resource development.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sarah Hall (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPSC 243.

  • EPSC 182 Astrobiology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Astrobiology is the search for the origin, evolution and destiny of life in the universe. The course will provide insight into the formation and evolution of habitable worlds, the evolution of life and the biogeochemical cycles in the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, and the potential for biological evolution beyond an organism's planet of origin.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Hojatollah Vali (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures

    • This is a double-prefix course and is identical in content with ANAT 182.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ANAT 205/EPSC 205 or ANAT 182.

  • EPSC 201 Understanding Planet Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Learn about Earth's origin, its place in the solar system, its internal structure, rocks and minerals, the formation of metal and fossil fuel deposits, and the extinction of dinosaurs. Discover the impact of the volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and mountain chains on Earth's past, present and future. Explore 125 million-year-old Mount Royal.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Anthony E Williams-Jones (Fall) Alfonso Mucci (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter

    • 3 hours lectures; afternoon field trips

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking EPSC 233.

  • EPSC 203 Structural Geology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Primary igneous and sedimentary structures, attitudes of planes and lines, stress and strain, fracturing of rocks, faulting, homogeneous strain, description and classification of folds, foliation and lineation, orthographic and stereographic projections.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Andrew J Hynes (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

  • EPSC 210 Introductory Mineralogy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Crystal chemistry and identification of the principal rock-forming and ore minerals. Elementary crystallography. Optional 2-day field trip.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Jeanne Paquette (Fall)

  • EPSC 212 Introductory Petrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : A survey of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and the processes responsible for their formation. The laboratory will emphasize the recognition of rocks in both hand-specimen and thin section using optical microscopes.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Walter Edward Trzcienski (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: EPSC 210

  • EPSC 220 Principles of Geochemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Basic concepts in geochemistry and the application of geochemical principles of chemistry to geological subdisciplines. Particular emphasis on origin of elements, controls on their distribution in Earth and cosmos, isotopes, organic geochemistry and water chemistry. Application of phase diagrams to geology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Don Baker (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory

  • EPSC 231 Field School 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Geological mapping of selected areas, preparation of maps, reports from field notes, aerial photographs, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Andrew J Hynes (Winter)

  • EPSC 233 Earth and Life History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Interpretation of stratified rocks; history of Earth with special emphasis on the regions of North America; outline of the history of life recorded in fossils.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Galen Halverson (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

  • EPSC 320 Elementary Earth Physics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Physical properties of Earth and the processes associated with its existence as inferred from astronomy, geodesy, seismology, geology, terrestrial magnetism and thermal evolution.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Olivia Jensen (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisite: MATH 222

  • EPSC 334 Invertebrate Paleontology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Preservation of fossils; the fossil record of invertebrates; use of fossils in stratigraphy and paleoecology; fossils in evolutionary studies. Fossils of invertebrates are studied in the laboratory.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jeanne Paquette (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures and one laboratory period

  • EPSC 425 Sediments to Sequences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Processes and products of modern and ancient carbonate and siliciclastic depositional environments. Sequence stratigraphy as a tool for studying the fundamental controls (sea level, tectonics, sediment supply, etc.) on stratigraphic architecture.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Geography

Students in any Minor Concentration, Major Concentration, Honours or Joint Honours program in Geography cannot choose this disciplinary area

Geography advisors recommend including some preparation in chemistry, statistics and calculus for a concentration in this area even if formal prerequisites are not in place.

Students select 15 credits from:

  • GEOG 203 Environmental Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to system-level interactions among climate, hydrology, soils and vegetation at the scale of drainage basins, including the study of the global geographical variability in these land-surface systems. The knowledge acquired is used to study the impact on the environment of various human activities such as deforestation and urbanisation.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gail L Chmura, Meaghan Murphy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Because of quantitative science content of course, not recommended for B.A. and B.Ed. students in their U0 year.

  • GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present and Future (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of global change, from the Quaternary Period to the present day involving changes in the physical geography of specific areas. Issues such as climatic change and land degradation will be discussed, with speculations on future environments.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Gail L Chmura, Meaghan Murphy (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 272 Earth's Changing Surface (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the study of landforms as products of geomorphic and geologic systems acting at and near the Earth's surface. The process geomorphology approach will be used to demonstrate how landforms of different geomorphic settings represent a dynamic balance between forces acting in the environment and the physical properties of materials present.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 305 Soils and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the major properties of soils; soil formation, classification and mapping; land capability assessment; the role and response of soils in natural and disturbed environments (e.g. global change, ecosystem disturbance).

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 hours and laboratory

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or introductory course in biology or geology

  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Scope of climatology, physical, dynamic and applied. The Earth/atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances, governing meteorological processes. Movement and circulation of the atmosphere on a local and global scale. Resulting weather systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • GEOG 350 Ecological Biogeography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The study of the patterns of distribution of organisms in space and time with emphasis on plant communities. Ecological, geographical, historical and anthropological factors affecting these distribution patterns will be discussed. Particular consideration is given to methods for description and classification of plant communities.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • GEOG 372 Running Water Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course focuses on the physical habitat conditions found in streams, rivers, estuaries and deltas. Based on the laws governing flow of water and sediment transport, it emphasizes differences among these environments, in terms of channel form, flow patterns, substrate composition and mode of evolution. Flooding, damming, channelisation, forestry impacts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Michel F Lapointe (Fall)

Mathematics and Statistics

THIS AREA OF SPECIALIZATION IS UNDER REVISION. INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD SPEAK WITH AN ADVISER ABOUT APPROPRIATE COURSE SELECTION FOR THIS AREA.

Students in any Minor concentration, Major concentration, Honours or Joint Honours program in Mathematics and Statistics cannot choose this disciplinary area.

The 15 credits of courses listed below are suggested for this discipline:

  • MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Systems of linear equations, matrices, inverses, determinants; geometric vectors in three dimensions, dot product, cross product, lines and planes; introduction to vector spaces, linear dependence and independence, bases; quadratic loci in two and three dimensions.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Djivede Kelome, William J Anderson, James G Loveys, Shahab Shahabi, Adam Clay (Fall) Djivede Kelome, William J Anderson (Winter) Karol Palka (Summer)

    • Prerequisite: a course in functions

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken MATH 221 or CEGEP objective 00UQ or equivalent.

    • Restriction Note B: Not open to students who have taken or are taking MATH 123, MATH 130 or MATH 131, except by permission of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Abbas Khalili Mahmoudabadi, Jose Andres Correa (Fall)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transfercredits/ for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

  • MATH 204 Principles of Statistics 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : The concept of degrees of freedom and the analysis of variability. Planning of experiments. Experimental designs. Polynomial and multiple regressions. Statistical computer packages (no previous computing experience is needed). General statistical procedures requiring few assumptions about the probability model.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent. No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • MATH 222 Calculus 3 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Taylor series, Taylor's theorem in one and several variables. Review of vector geometry. Partial differentiation, directional derivative. Extreme of functions of 2 or 3 variables. Parametric curves and arc length. Polar and spherical coordinates. Multiple integrals.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Wilbur Jonsson, Neville G F Sancho (Fall) Wilbur Jonsson (Winter)

  • MATH 338 History and Philosophy of Mathematics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Egyptian, Babylonian, Greek, Indian and Arab contributions to mathematics are studied together with some modern developments they give rise to, for example, the problem of trisecting the angle. European mathematics from the Renaissance to the 18th century is discussed in some detail.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Niky Kamran (Fall)

    • Fall

Microbiology and Immunology

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112, CHEM 120 (CHEM 121) or their CEGEP equivalents.

Students select 15 credits from the following MIMM courses and their associated prerequisites for this area:

  • MIMM 211 Introductory Microbiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A general treatment of microbiology bearing specifically on the biological properties of microorganisms. Emphasis will be on procaryotic cells. Basic principles of immunology and microbial genetics are also introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Benoit Cousineau, Martin Olivier, Amee Manges (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Corequisite: BIOL 200

  • MIMM 314 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the immune system, antigens, antibodies and lymphocytes. The course will cover the cellular and molecular basis of lymphocyte development and mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in immune responses.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Roger Palfree, Reza Alizadehfar, Ciriaco Piccirillo (Winter)

  • MIMM 323 Microbial Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the composition and structure of microbial cells, the biochemical activities associated with cellular metabolism and how these activities are regulated and coordinated. The course will have a molecular and genetic approach to the study of microbial physiology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gregory T Marczynski, James W Coulton, Bernard Turcotte (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lecture

    • Prerequisite: MIMM 211

  • MIMM 324 Fundamental Virology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the fundamental properties of viruses and their interactions with host cells. Bacteriophages, DNA- and RNA-containing animal viruses, and retroviruses are covered. Emphasis will be on phenomena occurring at the molecular level and on the regulated control of gene expression in virus-infected cells.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Matthias Gotte, Jose Guerreiro Teodoro, Jacques Archambault (Fall)

Associated 200-level prerequisites for the above MIMM courses:

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

One of:

  • BIOC 212 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : An introductory course describing the biochemistry and molecular biology of selected key functions of animal cells, including: gene expression; mitochondrial production of metabolic energy; cellular communication with the extra-cellular environment; and regulation of cell division.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Thomas Duchaine, Arnim Pause, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200

    • Restrictions: A non-terminal course intended to be followed by BIOC 311; BIOC 312 in the U2 year. Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 201 or ANAT 212.

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

Pathology

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112 plus CHEM 120 (or CHEM 121) or their CEGEP equivalents.

15 credits including PATH 300 and its associated pre- and corequisites from the list below comprise a disciplinary area well-suited to students with an interest in medicine.

  • BIOC 212 Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biochemistry (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Biochemistry : An introductory course describing the biochemistry and molecular biology of selected key functions of animal cells, including: gene expression; mitochondrial production of metabolic energy; cellular communication with the extra-cellular environment; and regulation of cell division.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Thomas Duchaine, Arnim Pause, Dieter Reinhardt (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200

    • Restrictions: A non-terminal course intended to be followed by BIOC 311; BIOC 312 in the U2 year. Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 201 or ANAT 212.

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • BIOL 201 Cell Biology and Metabolism (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : This course introduces the student to our modern understanding of cells and how they work. Major topics to be covered include: photosynthesis, energy metabolism and metabolic integration; plasma membrane including secretion, endocytosis and contact mediated interactions between cells; cytoskeleton including cell and organelle movement; the nervous system; hormone signaling; the cell cycle.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Robert Levine, Kathryn Hewitt, Gary Brouhard (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 212 or BIOC 212

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Michel Daoust, Youla S Tsantrizos, Nicolas Moitessier (Fall) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster, Ralf Schirrmacher (Winter) Michel Daoust, Ariel Fenster (Summer)

  • PATH 300 Human Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pathology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Pathology : Provides a fundamental understanding of the diseases prevalent in North America, for upper level students in the biological sciences. Includes: general responses of cells and organ systems to injury; assessment of individual diseases by relating the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention to the primary biological abnormalities in each disorder.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta (Winter)

  • PHGY 209 Mammalian Physiology 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of body fluids, blood, body defense mechanisms, muscle, peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous systems.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ann Wechsler, Phil Gold, Erik Cook (Fall)

  • PHGY 210 Mammalian Physiology 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, endocrine and renal systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John H White, Ann Wechsler, Anne-Marie Lauzon (Winter)

*Note: One of BIOC 212 or BIOL 201 but not both.

Physics

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: PHYS 131, PHYS 142, MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 222 or their CEGEP equivalents.

Most of the courses listed require at least CEGEP-level prerequisites or their equivalent in both Mathematics and Physics.

Students select 15 credits from the lists below.

Introductory courses with no prerequisites:

  • PHYS 180 Space, Time and Matter (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : A nonmathematical, conceptual look at physics, beginning with the idea of space and time, continuing with the historical development of Newtonian mechanics of celestial motion, electricity and magnetism, ether and light, Einstein's special and general theories of relativity, quantum mechanics, matter and antimatter, cosmology and the big bang.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Paul Wiseman (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Restrictions: Not open to students in a Physics program. Not open to students who have taken PHYS 200.

  • PHYS 224 Physics of Music (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : An introduction to the physics of music. Properties of sound and their perception as pitch, loudness, and timbre. Dissonance, consonance, and musical intervals and tuning. Physics of sound propagation and reflection. Resonance. Acoustic properties of pipes, strings, bars, and membranes, and sound production in wind, string, and percussion instruments. The human voice. Room reverberation and acoustics. Directional characteristics of sound sources.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Brigitte Vachon (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Designed for students in the Faculty of Music but suitable for students with an interest in music and its physical basis.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PHYS 225

Intermediate to advanced courses with 100-level Physics and Mathematics prerequisites that may not be counted toward the program:

  • PHYS 230 Dynamics of Simple Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : Translational motion under Newton's laws; forces, momentum, work/energy theorem. Special relativity; Lorentz transforms, relativistic mechanics, mass/energy equivalence. Topics in rotational dynamics. Noninertial frames.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Hong Guo (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisite: CEGEP Physics or PHYS 131.

    • Corequisite: MATH 222

    • Restriction: Not open to students taking or having passed PHYS 251

  • PHYS 232 Heat and Waves (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : The laws of thermodynamics and their consequences. Thermodynamics of P-V-T systems and simple heat engines. Free, driven, and damped harmonic oscillators. Coupled systems and normal modes. Fourier methods. Wave motion and dispersion. The wave equation.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Dominic Ryan (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisites: CEGEP Physics or PHYS 142, and CEGEP chemistry or CHEM 120, and PHYS 230.

    • Restriction: Not open to students taking or having passed PHYS 253

  • PHYS 241 Signal Processing (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : Linear circuit elements, resonance, network theorems, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, feedback, integrated circuits.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jean Barrette (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures; 3 hours laboratory alternate weeks

    • Prerequisite: CEGEP physics or PHYS 142.

  • PHYS 242 Electricity and Magnetism (2 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : Properties of electromagnetic fields, dipole and quadropole fields and their interactions, chemical binding of molecules, electromagnetic properties of materials, Maxwell's equations and properties of electromagnetic waves, propagation of waves in media.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Shaun MacDonald Lovejoy (Fall)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures

    • Prerequisites: CEGEP Physics, MATH 222

  • PHYS 257 Experimental Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : Introductory laboratory work and data analysis as related to mechanics, optics and thermodynamics. Introduction to computers as they are employed for laboratory work, for data analysis and for numerical computation. Previous experience with computers is an asset, but is not required.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Bradley Siwick (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 6 hours of laboratory and classroom work

    • Corequisite: PHYS 230 or PHYS 251

  • PHYS 258 Experimental Methods 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Physics : Advanced laboratory work and data analysis as related to mechanics, optics and thermodynamics. Computers will be employed routinely for data analysis and for numerical computation, and, particularly, to facilitate the use of Fourier methods.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Dominic Ryan, Edith M Engelberg (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 6 hours of laboratory and classroom work

    • Prerequisite: PHYS 257

With the permission of the Physics Department, honours courses may be substituted for their major equivalents.

Physiology

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112, CHEM 110 (or CHEM 111), PHYS 101 (or PHYS 131) and PHYS 102 (or PHYS 142), CHEM 120 (or CHEM 121) or their CEGEP equivalents.

15 credits of Physiology from the lists below as indicated.

One of two sets of 200-level introductory Physiology courses.

Note: The two courses in the set below have CHEM 212 as their prerequisite.

  • PHGY 201 Human Physiology: Control Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of body fluids, blood, nerve and muscle, peripheral nerves, central nervous system, special senses, autonomic nervous system, defense mechanisms.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture weekly

    • Prerequisites: collegial courses in biology or anatomy, and in chemistry and physics; with CHEM 212 or equivalent, as a pre-/co-requisite

    • Restriction: For students in Physical and Occupational Therapy, Nursing, and others with permission of the course coordinator

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PHGY 209

  • PHGY 202 Human Physiology: Body Functions (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, and digestive systems; organic and energy metabolism; nutrition; exercise and environmental stress.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture weekly

    • Prerequisites: collegial courses in biology or anatomy and in chemistry and physics; with CHEM 212 or equivalent, as a pre-/co-requisite

    • Restriction: For students in Physical and Occupational Therapy, Nursing, Education, and others with permission of the course coordinator

    • Restriction: Not open to students who took 552-201 in 1976-77 or earlier, or PHGY 210

Note: The two courses in the set below have CHEM 212, BIOL 200 and BIOL 201 or BIOC 212 as their prerequisites.

One or more of the higher level Physiology courses below.

Note: PHGY 311 is a prerequisite for PHGY 312 and PHGY 313.

  • PHGY 311 Channels, Synapses & Hormones (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses on cellular communication in the nervous system and the endocrine system.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ellis Cooper, Ali Haghighi (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 afternoons per term

    • Prerequisite: PHGY 209 or permission of the instructor.

  • PHGY 312 Respiratory, Renal, & Cardiovascular Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses underlying our current understanding of topics in renal, respiratory and cardiovascular functions explored beyond the introductory level.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John W Hanrahan, Jacopo Mortola, Sheldon A Magder (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 Wednesday afternoons per term

    • Prerequisites: PHGY 209 and PHGY 210 or equivalent, PHGY 311 or permission of the instructor

  • PHGY 313 Blood, Gastrointestinal, & Immune Systems Physiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : In-depth presentation of experimental results and hypotheses underlying our current understanding of topics in immunology, blood and fluids, and gastrointestinal physiology.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Julio Martinez Trujillo, Volker Manfred Blank, Russell Jones (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours of lectures per week; 1-3 hours optional lab/demonstration/tutorial arranged for a maximum of 3 Wednesday afternoons per term

    • Prerequisites: PHGY 209 and PHGY 210 or equivalent, PHGY 311 or permission of the instructor

Psychology

Students in any Minor Concentration, Major Concentration, Honours or Joint Honours program in Psychology cannot choose this disciplinary area.

Prerequisites which cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration: PSYC 100 plus BIOL 111 or BIOL 112 or BIOL 115 (or their CEGEP equivalents).

Note: PSYC 204 is prerequisite to this area.

15 credits of Psychology selected as follows:

6 credits from the following core courses:

  • PSYC 211 Introductory Behavioural Neuroscience (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : An introduction to contemporary research on the relationship between brain and behaviour. Topics include learning, memory and cognition, brain damage and neuroplasticity, emotion and motivation, and drug addiction and brain reward circuits. Much of the evidence will be drawn from the experimental literature on research with animals.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Yogita Chudasama (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures

    • Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent

  • PSYC 212 Perception (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Perception is the organization of sensory input into a representation of the environment. Topics include: survey of sensory coding mechanisms (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, gustatory), object recognition, spatial localization, perceptual constancies and higher level influences.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Shahin Zangenehpour (Fall) Shahin Zangenehpour (Winter) Shahin Zangenehpour (Summer)

    • 2 lectures; 1 conference

  • PSYC 213 Cognition (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : Where do thoughts come from? What is the nature of thought, and how does it arise in the mind and the brain? Cognition is the study of human information processing, and we will explore topics such as memory, attention, categorization, decision making, intelligence, philosophy of mind, and the mind-as computer metaphor.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Jelena Ristic (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures, 1 conference

    • Prerequisite: One previous course in Psychology.

  • PSYC 215 Social Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The course offers students an overview of the major topics in social psychology. Three levels of analysis are explored beginning with individual processes (e.g., attitudes, attribution), then interpersonal processes (e.g., attraction, communication, love) and finally social influence processes (e.g., conformity, norms, roles, reference groups).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Donald M Taylor (Fall) Michael John L Sullivan (Winter)

Plus Psychology courses at the 300-level or higher (excluding PSYC 305) to complete 15 credits for the area.

Faculty of Arts—2010-2011 (last updated Jan. 19, 2011) (disclaimer)