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Note: This is the 20102011 edition of the eCalendar. For the most recent publication, click here.  

Faculty Program Environment - Ecological Determinants of Health in Society (54 credits)

Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Arts

Program Requirements

An understanding of the interface between human health and environment depends not only on an appreciation of the biological and ecological determinants of health, but equally on an appreciation of the role of social sciences in the design, implementation, and monitoring of interventions. Demographic patterns and urbanization, economic forces, ethics, indigenous knowledge and culture, and an understanding of how social change can be effected are all critical if we are to be successful in our efforts to assure health of individuals and societies in the future. Recognizing the key role that nutritional status plays in maintaining a healthy body, and the increasing importance of infection as a health risk linked intimately with the environment, this domain prepares students to contribute to the solution of problems of nutrition and infection by tying the relevant natural sciences to the social sciences.

Program Prerequisites or Corequisites

All B.A. Environment students MUST take these pre- or corequisite courses, or their equivalents. These courses should be taken in the Freshman year if possible. Quebec students can take them in U1.

Calculus

3 credits of calculus from the following, or equivalent (e.g., CEGEP objective 00UN):

  • MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus (4 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Review of trigonometry and other Precalculus topics. Limits, continuity, derivative. Differentiation of elementary functions. Antidifferentiation. Applications.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Axel W Hundemer, Stephen W Drury (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 4 hours lecture; 1 hour tutorial

    • Prerequisite: a course in functions

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CEGEP objective 00UN or equivalent.

    • Restriction Note B: Not open to students who have taken or are taking MATH 122, except by permission of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

    • Students continue in MATH 141

    • Each Tutorial section is enrolment limited

  • MATH 140 Calculus 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Review of functions and graphs. Limits, continuity, derivative. Differentiation of elementary functions. Antidifferentiation. Applications.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Stephen W Drury, Sidney Trudeau, Shahab Shahabi (Fall) Axel W Hundemer (Winter)

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour tutorial

    • Prerequisite: High School Calculus

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken MATH 120, MATH 139 or CEGEP objective 00UN or equivalent

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking MATH 122 or MATH 130 or MATH 131, except by permission of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics

    • Each Tutorial section is enrolment limited

Basic Science

3 credits of basic science from the following, or equivalent (e.g., CEGEP objective 00UK):

  • AEBI 120 General Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : An introduction to the structure, function and adaptation of plants and animals in the biosphere.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have passed CEGEP objective 00UK or equivalent (formerly Biology 301)

  • BIOL 111 Principles: Organismal Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to the phylogeny, structure, function and adaptation of unicellular organisms, plants and animals in the biosphere.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves, Rajinder S Dhindsa, Claire Seizilles de Mazancourt (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken CEGEP objective 00UK or equivalent; or BIOL 115.

    • This course serves as an alternative to CEGEP objective code 00UK

    • May require departmental approval.

    • Open to all students wishing introductory biology.

    • Attendance at first lab is mandatory to confirm registration in the course.

    • This class will use a Student Response System (clicker) which can be obtained from the Bookstore.

Suggested First Year (U1) Courses

For suggestions on courses to take in your first year (U1), you can consult the "MSE Student Handbook 2010-11" available on the MSE website (http://www.mcgill.ca/mse), or contact Kathy Roulet, the Program Advisor (kathy [dot] roulet [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

Program Requirements

NOTE: Students are required to take a maximum of 30 credits at the 200-level and a minimum of 12 credits at the 400-level or higher in this program. This includes Core and Required courses, but does not include the Program prerequisites or corequisites listed above.

Location Note: When planning their schedule and registering for courses, students should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's downtown campus and at the Macdonald Campus in Ste. Anne de Bellevue.

Core: Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core Required courses are taught at both McGill's downtown campus and at the Macdonald Campus in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: George McCourt, James W Fyles, Frederic Fabry, Jeanine Rhemtulla, Eyad Hashem Atallah (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Elena Bennett, Mark Purdon, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois, George McCourt, Terry A Wheeler, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, Colin Austin Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Timothy A Johns (Fall) Renee Sieber, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta, Rafael Angel Reyna Hurtado (Fall) Colin Austin Chapman, Raja Sengupta, Ismael Vaccaro, E Joan Marshall (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001

    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051

    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: David Goodin, Mariève Isabel (Fall) David Goodin, Mark Purdon, Iwao Hirose, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Mariève Isabel (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Core: Complementary Course - Senior Research Project (3 credits)

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.

  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Frederic Fabry, George McCourt, Kathryn Roulet (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301

    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.

  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Complementary Courses (33 credits)

33 credits of complementary courses are chosen as follows:

18 credits of Fundamentals, maximum 3 credits from any one category
9 credits from List A
6 credits from List B

Fundamentals:

18 credits of Fundamentals (3 credits from each category):

Health and Environment

  • GEOG 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course introduced physical and social environments as factors in human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as NRSC 221. Students enrolled in downtown campus programs register in GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register in NRSC 221. In Winter 2011, GEOG221/NRSC 221 will be taught on the downtown campus.

  • NRSC 221 Environment and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Introduction to physical and social environments as factors contributing to the production of human health, with emphasis on the physical properties of the atmospheric environment as they interact with diverse human populations in urban settings.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan, Nancy Ross (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken GEOG 221.

    • Note: This course is also offered as GEOG 221. Students enrolled in main campus programs register as GEOG 221; students enrolled in Macdonald campus programs register as NRSC 221.

Health and Infection

  • GEOG 403 Global Health and Environmental Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Major themes and contemporary case studies in global health and environmental change. Focus on understanding global trends in emerging infectious disease from social, biophysical, and geographical perspectives, and critically assessing the health implications of environmental change in different international contexts.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lea Berrang Ford (Fall)

  • PARA 410 Environment and Infection (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : Infectious pathogens of humans and animals and their impact on the global environment are considered. The central tenet is that infectious pathogens are environmental risk factors. The course considers their impact on the human condition and juxtaposes the impact of control and treatment measures and environmental change.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Marilyn Scott (Winter)

Health and Pollution

  • ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Beliefs and practices concerning sickness and healing are examined in a variety of Western and non-Western settings. Special attention is given to cultural constructions of the body and to theories of disease causation and healing efficacy. Topics include international health, medical pluralism, transcultural psychiatry, and demography.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Margaret Stevenson (Fall)

    • Fall

  • NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The environmental contaminants which cause pollution; sources, amounts and transport of pollutants in water, air and soil; waste management.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Lyle Whyte, William H Hendershot (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 333

Economics

  • AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The field of economics as it relates to the activities of individual consumers, firms and organizations. Emphasis is on the application of economic principles and concepts to everyday decision making and to the analysis of current economic issues.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Anwar Naseem (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

  • ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis and Applications (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A university-level introduction to demand and supply, consumer behaviour, production theory, market structures and income distribution theory.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Paul Dickinson, Mayssun El-Attar Vilalta (Fall) Paul Dickinson (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ECON 230 or ECON 250

Nutrition

  • NUTR 200 Contemporary Nutrition (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Provides students without a biology/chemistry background with the fundamental tools to critically assess nutrition related information, to evaluate their own diets, and to implement healthy changes. Emphasis is on current issues and maximizing health and disease prevention at different stages of the lifecycle.

    Terms: Summer 2011

    Instructors: Maureen Rose, Mary Hendrickson-Nelson (Summer)

    • Summer

    • Restriction: Not open for credit to students with a biology or chemistry course in their program, or to students registered in the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, or to students who take NUTR 207.

  • NUTR 207 Nutrition and Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Dietetics & Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Provides students who have a basic biology/chemistry background with the fundamental information on how macronutrients, vitamins and minerals are metabolized in the body, followed by application to evaluate current issues of maximizing health and disease prevention at different stages of the lifecycle.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Linda J Wykes (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Corequisites: AEBI202 or CEGEP Objective 00XU or FDSC230 or CEGEP Objective 00XV

    • Restriction: Not open to students who take NUTR 200 or EDKP 292

    • Restriction: Science students in physical science and psychology programs who wish to take this course should see the Arts and Science Student Affairs Office for permission to register.

Statistics

One of the following statistics courses or equivalent:

Note: Credit given for statistics courses is subject to certain restrictions. Students should consult the "Course Overlap" information in the "Course Requirements" section for the Faculty of Arts.

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Kelly Ann Bona (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Abbas Khalili Mahmoudabadi, Jose Andres Correa (Fall)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transfercredits/ for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

  • SOCI 350 Statistics in Social Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. The course is designed to help students develop a critical attitude toward statistical argument. It serves as a background for further statistics courses, helping to provide the intuition which can sometimes be lost amid the formulas.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Kenneth MacKenzie (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: SOCI 211

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PSYC 204, PSYC 305 or ECON 227

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

List A:

9 credits from List A (maximum 3 credits from any one category):

Health and Society

  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Nancy Ross (Winter)

  • SOCI 234 Population and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introduction to the reciprocal linkages in the social world between population size, structure and dynamics on the one hand, social structure, action and change on the other. An examination of population processes and their relation to the social world.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: John Sandberg (Winter)

  • SOCI 309 Health and Illness (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Health and illness as social rather than purely bio-medical phenomena. Topics include: studies of ill persons, health care occupations and organizations; poverty and health; inequalities in access to and use of health services; recent policies, ideologies, and problems in reform of health services organization.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Amelie Quesnel Vallee (Fall)

Hydrology and Climate

  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Shiv Prasher (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2 hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.

  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Scope of climatology, physical, dynamic and applied. The Earth/atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances, governing meteorological processes. Movement and circulation of the atmosphere on a local and global scale. Resulting weather systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Winter)

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • NRSC 510 Agricultural Micrometeorology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Interaction between plant communities and the atmosphere. The physical processes governing the transfer of heat, mass and momentum as they relate to research and production in agricultural and environmental systems. Experimental techniques for measuring fluxes of heat, water-vapour, CO2 and natural and man-made pollutants.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Ian Brett Strachan (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AEPH 510

Agriculture

  • AGRI 210 Agro-Ecological History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Introduction to the environmental consequences of agriculture through time, relating the cultural diversity of agronomic practices to regionally varied ecological processes.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • 3 lectures

  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250

  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Humberto Monardes (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and 1 conference

Decision Making

  • AGEC 242 Management Theories and Practices (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : An introduction to contemporary management theories and practices in organizations of the food sector.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Brahm Canzer (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

  • BTEC 502 Biotechnology Ethics and Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biotechnology : Examination of particular social and ethical challenges posed by modern biotechnology such as benefit sharing, informed consent in the research setting, access to medical care worldwide, environmental safety and biodiversity and the ethical challenges posed by patenting life.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Cory Labrecque (Winter)

    • Restriction: U3 and over.

  • ECON 440 Health Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The organization and performance of Canada's health care system are examined from an economist's perspective. The system is described and its special features analyzed. Much attention is given to the role of government in the system and to financing arrangements for hospital and medical services. Current financial problems are discussed.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Erin Strumpf (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 227 or comparable courses or consent of the instructor

  • PHIL 343 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An investigation of ethical issues as they arise in the practice of medicine (informed consent, e.g.) or in the application of medical technology (in vitro fertilization, euthanasia, e.g.)

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Iwao Hirose (Fall)

  • URBP 520 Globalization: Planning and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Economic and social issues related to planning for sustainable development, with a focus on water. Political and environmental determinants of resource use. Impact of global, regional and local institutions, programs and plans in Barbados and in the field locale in general.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Leroy E Phillip, Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (3-3-3)

    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.

Biology Fundamentals:

  • AEBI 210 Organisms 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The biology of plants and plant-based systems in managed and natural terrestrial environments. The interactions between autotrophs and soil organisms and selected groups of animals with close ecological and evolutionary connections with plants (e.g., herbivores and pollinators) will be explored in lecture and laboratory.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Jaswinder Singh (Fall)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken PLNT 201 or PLNT 211

    • 2 hour lecture and 3 hour lab

  • AEBI 211 Organisms 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Introduction to the biology, physiology, structure and function of heterotrophs and their interactions with other organisms. This course will focus on animals in terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. Topics include bioenergetics and functional metabolism, adaptations to environments, animal-animal, animal-plant, and animal-pathogen interactions.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: David James Lewis (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 200

  • BIOL 200 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The physical and chemical properties of the cell and its components in relation to their structure and function. Topics include: protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics; nucleic acid replication, transcription and translation; the genetic code, mutation, recombination, and regulation of gene expression.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Richard D W Roy, Gregory G Brown, Francesco Fagotto, Monique Zetka (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour optional tutorial

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 112 or equivalent

    • Corequisite: CHEM 212 or equivalent

  • BIOL 205 Biology of Organisms (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Unified view of form and function in animals and plants. Focus on how the laws of chemistry and physics illuminate biological processes relating to the acquisition of energy and materials and their use in movement, growth, development, reproduction and responses to environmental stress.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Rajinder S Dhindsa (Winter)

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Frederic Guichard (Fall)

  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Christopher Buddle (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205

  • LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids; enzymes and coenzymes. Introduction to intermediary metabolism.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Winter 2011

    Instructors: Reza Salavati (Fall) Armando Jardim (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken FDSC 211

    • Co-requisite: FDSC 230

  • PHGY 202 Human Physiology: Body Functions (3 credits)

    Offered by: Physiology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Physiology : Physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, and digestive systems; organic and energy metabolism; nutrition; exercise and environmental stress.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture weekly

    • Prerequisites: collegial courses in biology or anatomy and in chemistry and physics; with CHEM 212 or equivalent, as a pre-/co-requisite

    • Restriction: For students in Physical and Occupational Therapy, Nursing, Education, and others with permission of the course coordinator

    • Restriction: Not open to students who took 552-201 in 1976-77 or earlier, or PHGY 210

Development and Ecology

  • ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Processes of developmental change, as they affect small communities in the Third World and in unindustrialized parts of developed countries. Problems of technological change, political integration, population growth, industrialization, urban growth, social services, infrastructure and economic dependency.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Alberto Sanchez (Winter)

    • Winter

  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Colin Hartley Scott (Winter)

  • GEOG 300 Human Ecology in Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course will examine research approaches in human ecology since its inception early in this century. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical shifts that have led to its emergence as an important social science perspective. The course will also involve case studies to evaluate the methodological utility of the approach.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: George Wenzel (Winter)

  • SOCI 254 Development and Underdevelopment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Competing theories about the causes of underdevelopment in the poor countries. Topics include the impact of geography, the population explosion, culture and national character, economic and sexual inequalities, democracy and dictatorship. Western imperialism and multi-national corporations, reliance on the market, and development through local participation, cooperation, and appropriate technology.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Uli Locher (Fall)

    • Summer

List B:

6 credits from List B (maximum 3 credits from any one category):

Advanced Ecology

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: David M Green, Andrew Gonzalez (Fall)

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or Permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410

  • WILD 410 Wildlife Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Ecological processes and theories in animal populations. Interrelationships among biological processes, biotic and abiotic factors, and life history strategies. Topics include population dynamics, optimization strategies, predation, habitat selection, risks and decision making, and social behaviour. Application of problem-solving approach to wildlife ecology through individual and group work.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Pest Management

  • BIOL 350 Insect Biology and Control (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Introduction to insect structure, physiology, biochemistry, development, systematics, evolution, ecology and control. Stress on interrelationships and integrated pest control.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENTO 330 or ENTO 350.

    • Note: This course is also offered as ENTO 350 in the winter term.

  • ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Modern concepts of integrated control techniques and principles of insect pest management, with emphasis on biological control (use of predators, parasites and pathogens against pest insects), population monitoring, and manipulation of environmental, behavioral and physiological factors in the pest's way of life. Physical, cultural, and genetic controls and an introduction to the use of non-toxic biochemical controls (attractants, repellents, pheromones, antimetabolites).

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy, Guy Boivin (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have previously taken ENTO 452

    • 3 lectures

Techniques and Management

  • CHEE 230 Environmental Aspects of Technology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Chemical Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Chemical Engineering : The impact of urbanization and technology on the environment. Topics include urbanization: causes, effects, land use regulations; transportation technology and environmental implications; environmental impact of energy conversions; energy policy alternatives; formulation of energy and environmental policy; air pollution: sources, effects, control; water pollution: sources, effects, control.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Theodora Alexakis (Winter)

    • (3-0-6)

  • GEOG 201 Introductory Geo-Information Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to Geographic Information Systems. The systematic management of spatial data. The use and construction of maps. The use of microcomputers and software for mapping and statistical work. Air photo and topographic map analyses.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Renee Sieber, Raja Sengupta (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours and lab

  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2010, Summer 2011

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 208 or permission of instructor.

  • GEOG 380 Adaptive Environmental Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Articulates and evaluates competing hypotheses about the functioning of human-dominated ecosystems. Introduces the use of statistics, ecological modeling, and management in an integrated ecological management context. Case studies examine factors that impede and enhance adaptive management.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • NRSC 430 GIS for Natural Resource Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the presentation and analysis of ecological information, including sources and capture of spatial data; characterizing, transforming, displaying spatial data; and spatial analysis to solve resource management problems.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: At least one environmental science course and one ecology course or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken GEOG 201, 306 or 307 or BREE/ABEN 430. Limited to 32 students.

  • PARA 515 Water, Health and Sanitation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : The origin and types of water contaminants including live organisms, infectious agents and chemicals of agricultural and industrial origins. Conventional and new technological developments to eliminate water pollutants. Comparisons of water, health and sanitation between industrialized and developing countries.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Timothy Geary (Winter)

Social Change

  • EDER 461 Society and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Factors influencing patterns of stability and change in major social institutions and the implications for formal and non-formal education.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • HIST 292 History and the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Sketch of the history of the material aspects of human interaction with the rest of nature. Included will be a historian's view of the social, technical, and ecological implications of the great variety of activities devised by our species. Though global in outlook, this course will emphasize the relevant historiography of France, England and North America.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Immunology and Infectious Disease

  • MIMM 314 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : An introduction to the immune system, antigens, antibodies and lymphocytes. The course will cover the cellular and molecular basis of lymphocyte development and mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in immune responses.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Roger Palfree, Reza Alizadehfar, Ciriaco Piccirillo (Winter)

  • MIMM 324 Fundamental Virology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the fundamental properties of viruses and their interactions with host cells. Bacteriophages, DNA- and RNA-containing animal viruses, and retroviruses are covered. Emphasis will be on phenomena occurring at the molecular level and on the regulated control of gene expression in virus-infected cells.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Matthias Gotte, Jose Guerreiro Teodoro, Jacques Archambault (Fall)

  • MIMM 413 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Microbiology & Immunology (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Microbiology and Immun (Sci) : A study of the biology, immunological aspects of host-parasite interactions, pathogenicity, epidemiology and molecular biological aspects of selected parasites of medical importance. Laboratory will consist of a lecture on techniques, demonstrations and practical work.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Zafer Ali Khan, Martin Olivier, John Dalton (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: MIMM 314 or equivalent - ANAT 261 is strongly recommended

  • PARA 438 Immunology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : An in-depth analysis of the principles of cellular and molecular immunology. The emphasis of the course is on host defence against infection and on diseases caused by abnormal immune responses.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Florence Dzierszinski (Fall)

    • 3 lectures per week

    • Prerequisites: AEBI 202 or LSCI 202 or permission of instructor

  • WILD 424 Parasitology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Systematics, morphology, biology and ecology of parasitic protozoa, flatworms, roundworms and arthropods with emphasis on economically and medically important species.

    Terms: Winter 2011

    Instructors: Petra Rohrbach (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 424 (formerly ZOOL 424).

Populations and Place

  • CANS 407 Regions of Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Institute for Study of Canada (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Canadian Studies : Canadian regionalism and its manifestations in literature and the media, as well as in social and public policy, focusing on one region in Canada.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: CANS 200 or permission of instructor

  • GEOG 498 Humans in Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on understanding of inter-relations between humans and neotropical environments represented in Panama. Study of contemporary rural landscapes, their origins, development and change. Impacts of economic growth and inequality, social organization, and politics on natural resource use and environmental degradation. Site visits and field exercises in peasant/colonist, Amerindian, and plantation communities.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 6 hours lecture for 4 weeks, 3 hours seminar, 2 hours laboratory, 8 hours conference

    • Restriction: Location in Panama. Student must register for a full semester of studies in Panama

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203 or equivalents

  • PSYC 533 International Health Psychology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The focus will be on health and illness in developing countries, in particular, on health problems (malnutrition, alcohol abuse, mental illness, family planning, and HIV) where psychosocial factors play a large role in the problem and the solution. Attempted solutions based on community participation, health education, non-governmental and international agencies will be discussed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • SOCI 520 Migration and Immigrant Groups (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Review of the major demographic, economic and sociological theories of internal and international migration. The main emphasis will be on empirical research on migration and immigrant groups.

    Terms: Fall 2010

    Instructors: Zoua Vang (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: 15 credits in the Social Sciences

  • SOCI 550 Developing Societies (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Comparison of alternative explanations of underdevelopment: the impact of social stratification, relations of domination and subordination between countries, state interference with the market. Alternative strategies of change: revolution, structural adjustment, community development and cooperatives. Students will write and present a research paper, and participate extensively in class discussion.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

  • SOCI 565 Social Change in Panama (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Analysis of social change in Panama, particularly during the 20th century: demography, social and economic structures, rural and urban activities and landscapes, indigenous peoples, the effects of the Canal and the Free Trade Zone. Focus throughout on the interaction of human society and the environment.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2010-2011 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: SOCI 210 and SOCI 350 or equivalents.

    • Restriction: Students must register for a full term in the Panama Field Studies Semester.

    • Note: Four field trips.

Faculty of Arts—2010-2011 (last updated Jan. 19, 2011) (disclaimer)