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Responsibilities for students on government aid

On this page you will find students' responsibilities as they pertain to government loans. For more general scholarships and awards responsibilities, please also refer to the Regulations & Responsibilities section found under McGill Scholarships & Aid. 

It is a student’s responsibility to:
  1. Read, understand and adhere to the declarations you sign, as well as the terms and conditions stipulated on a government student loan agreement/certificate.
  2. Present a valid McGill ID card (and a government issued photo ID and Social Insurance Number card when required) when picking up government loan documents from the Student Aid Office. 
  3. Promptly negotiate a government loan with a bank/lender.
  4. Ask questions to the government aid Professional who specializes in the jurisdiction in question. It is important to understand the entire process involved when you are assuming a form of debt.
  5. Know the application deadlines and satisfy any outstanding document requirements on a timely basis.
  6. Regularly check their email account for any government notifications or instructions, and take any necessary action on a timely basis.
  7. Know their rights and responsibilities to make informed decisions about their government aid. You are borrowing money in the form of a student loan from the provincial or federal government. These loans must be repaid even if you do not complete your program, are unable to find employment after graduation or you are dissatisfied in any way with the university or program.  
  8. Contact the Scholarships & Student Aid Office to acquire an advance understanding of the impact of any reduction to course load, withdrawal from studies, change of financial situation, etc. A non-exhaustive list of repercussions of academic and administrative decisions includes:
    • Not applying for financial aid and/or awards on a timely basis: this can result in the inability to gain maximum funding, paying interest and penalties on unpaid bills due to delays, or the requirement to complete extra paperwork on existing loans to continue your interest-free status.
    • Not maintaining a full course load and/or withdrawal from studies.  Unless you can be 'deemed' full time (depending on the government jurisdiction, examples include a recognized disability or having young dependents), a part-time course load may create a loss of government aid, an over-payment situation, the obligation to repay prior loans or encountering a time limitation before completing your intended degree(s).
    • Not reporting changes in income: unreported income (yours and others who are providing information on your application) could result in an over-payment situation or the inability to apply for aid in the future.
  9. Protect your eligibility for government aid by starting and finishing your academic year as a full-time student, and to make progress towards your degree by successfully completing your courses with passing grades.  
  10. Report any changes in their academic status on a timely basis to the Scholarships & Student Aid Office which is responsible for the confirmation of enrolment, course load and withdrawal from studies to government aid authorities.  
  11. Request a continuation of interest-free status (also known as 'interest deferment') on existing loans if maintaining a full-time course load.  By not initiating this, the student is responsible for interest that will accrue as a result.