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Works-in-Progress Seminars

What is a "Works-in-Progress" seminar?

The objective of WIPS is to provide an informal intellectual forum where grad students, post-docs, faculty, and visiting researchers can present and discuss their work (dissertation and book chapters and proposals, conference papers, article chapters, and other intellectual endeavors). WIPS is open to everyone, and we welcome your participation and support.

Who is invited?

Graduate students, faculty, and all those with an interest in the Social Studies of Medicine.

How does it work?

The format of the series will be based on pre-circulated papers, and will allow ample time for discussing the problems and possibilities associated with producing and improving our work.

How do I get the papers?

It's easy! Just email the Departmental Secretary at ssom [at] mcgill [dot] ca and request a copy.

When and where are the seminars?

Please see the listing below. It will be updated frequently.

Who can I contact for more information?

Andrea Tone at andrea [dot] tone [at] mcgill [dot] ca

UPCOMING WORKS-IN-PROGRESS SEMINARS

 

Wednesday March 19th, 2014 at 12:30 to 1:30 pm

3647 Peel Street,  Seminar room 102

 Feel free to bring your lunch!

Who:Nils Hansson

 Title: "Nobel Prize nominations of and by cutting-edge-surgeons 1901-1951: What can we learn from them?"

 

Abstract:The archive of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine is a remarkable and underused repository that contains correspondence, reports, and dossiers of the nominations of senior and junior physicians from around the world. Although this archive has begun to be used more by scholars, it has been insufficiently examined by historians of surgery.  In this talk, I will present some preliminary results from my study on Nobel Prize nominations of surgeons and raise questions about scientific priority disputes in German surgery in the first half of the 20th century.

 

Wednesday April 2nd, 2014 at 12:30 to 1:30 pm

3647 Peel Street,  Seminar room 102

Feel free to bring your lunch!

Who: Susanne Michl

TBA

 

PREVIOUS WORKS-IN-PROGRESS SEMINARS

Monday, April 11th,2011 at 12:30 to 1:30 pm 3647 Peel Street, Don Bates Seminar room 101

Feel free to bring your lunch!

Who: Tess Lanzarotta

"Before Betty Ford: Explaining the Panic over Female Alcoholism"

Abstract: This paper seeks to explain the growth in media and medical interest in female alcoholism that began in the United States in the mid-1960s. Newspaper headlines informed Americans that women were entering the drinking population, becoming alcoholics, and seeking treatment in growing numbers. Meanwhile, alcoholism researchers increasingly published clinical studies on the behavior and characteristics of female alcoholics in an attempt to understand this seemingly new population of problem drinkers. I hope to outline the complex forces that shaped the emerging figure of the female alcoholic and explain how a disease long associated with men suddenly became one of women as well.

 

  

Wednesday, March 16,2011 at 12:30 to 1:30 pm,
3647 Peel Street, Don Bates Seminar room 101
Feel free to bring your lunch!

Who: Dr. Susan Lamb
Post-doc, History/Social Studies of Medicine

"Pathologist of the Mind: Adolf Meyer & the Origins of American Psychiatry"

Abstract: Drawn from my recently completed doctoral dissertation, this presentation explores Adolf Meyer’s influential but little-understood model of clinical psychiatry using examples taken from his daily interactions with his staff, patients, and their families. I utilize the individual experiences of those who worked and lived inside his famous clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital to provide a clear illustration of Meyer’s "psychobiological" theory, clinical techniques, and therapies to elucidate the internal logic and inconsistencies of the Meyerian model.

Monday, March 29, 2009 at 11:00-1:00pm
3647 Peel Street, DON BATES SEMINAR ROOM 101
Feel free to bring your lunch!

Who: Raul Necochea

Arrested Accusations: Reporting Abortions in Peru, 1890s-1940s.
This paper analyzes the state of medical knowledge about abortion in Peru between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as how this led (or failed to lead) to accusations against people for causing abortions. This paper also raises issues regarding lay knowledge of bodily processes, the use of social networks to avail oneself of illegal services, and tensions between sexual partners.

Monday, November 23, 2010 at 12:00-1:00pm
3647 Peel Street, DON BATES SEMINAR ROOM 101
Feel free to bring your lunch!

SECURING AND NEGOTIATING ONE'S FIRST BOOK CONTRACT
A lunchtime professionalization workshop to help graduate students and post-docs navigate the sometimes challenging maze of academic publishing.

Professor Andrea Tone, (SSOM/History) and Professor John Zucchi (Chair of the the History Department/Senior Editor of McGill-Queen's Press).

***Rsvp to Andrea Tone at andrea [dot] tone [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Wednesday, January 21, 2009 at 12:00-1:00pm
3647 Peel Street, DON BATES SEMINAR ROOM 101
Feel free to bring your lunch!

Lorenz Boehler

For the first WIPS in 2008, Thomas Schlich, (History of Medicine) will discuss his draft of “The Perfect Machine: Lorenz Böhler’s Rationalized Fracture Treatment in WWI.”

ABSTRACT: This paper examines Lorenz Böhler’s modernist system of rationalized fracture care as a particular case of medical rationalization and standardization. Böhler’s locally created culture of standardized practices is analyzed in the context of its concrete work environment but also situated in relation to different aspects of its wider cultural environment. Böhler’s project will be described as part of a more general trend of body-based rationalization efforts in industry and health care, in which the machine metaphor was used to characterize both the body and the work process. Since it originated in WWI, the conditions of the war will be discussed as enabling the emergence but also restricting the spread of Böhler’s system of fracture care. Its successful move to a civilian setting after WWI is explained through its fit with and further adaptation to the specific culture of rationalization in accident insurance and finally through its resonance with post-WWI Viennese Modernism to which it contributed. By emphasizing the practical and cultural contingencies of this success story this paper wants to contribute to a historically informed discussion of medical rationalization and standardization as a heterogeneous, value-laden, and historically contingent phenomenon.

***To obtain the above paper just email Thomas Schlich at thomas [dot] schlich [at] mcgill [dot] ca or the department at ssom [at] mcgill [dot] ca and request a copy. Participants are expected to read the paper in advance. There will be no presentation of the paper itself, just a discussion.

***Note: No WIPS articles, papers, etc. may be cited, circulated or copied.


Wednesday, January 28, 2009 at 12:00-1:00pm
3647 Peel Street, DON BATES SEMINAR ROOM 101
Feel free to bring your lunch!

Wilson Will, (Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology of Medicine) will discuss his draft of “Hope and Religion in the Clinical Setting: Trauma, Death, and the Limits of Biomedicine.”

ABSTRACT: Over the past fifteen years, the concept of hope has received surprisingly limited attention from either clinical medical anthropology or the anthropology of religion. A large number of health practitioners in the United States have written about the salience of hope for inpatient care, and various scholars of religion and philosophy have explored its theoretical implications, but these studies largely neglect the socio-cultural contexts in which hope is imagined, offered, and deployed. The goal of this essay is to develop an understanding of one specific technology of hope: hope within the context of Protestant hospital chaplaincy. I begin with a brief overview of key philosophical and Christian theological views about hope to orient the reader and then introduce the hospital chaplain as a culturally unique, embodied technology of hope within the clinical setting. I then turn to a case study from my own fieldwork as an anthropologist enrolled in a chaplaincy training program at a large inner-city university teaching hospital in the eastern U.S. to explore some manifestations of religious hope in an ostensibly secular, highly technological therapeutic setting.

***To obtain the above paper just email Wilson Will at wwill3 [at] yahoo [dot] com%3C/A%3E%20CLASS=" rel="nofollow">wwill3 [at] yahoo [dot] com or the department at ssom [at] mcgill [dot] ca and request a copy. Participants are expected to read the paper in advance. There will be no presentation of the paper itself, just a discussion.

***Note: No WIPS articles, papers, etc. may be cited, circulated or copied.