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SSOM Graduate Student News

SSOM CONGRATULATES THE FOLLOWING GRADUATE STUDENTS FOR THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS:

Jennifer Cuffe was awarded her Ph.D. in anthropology for her dissertation, "An empirical study of scientists’ reasoning in the Canadian regulatory evaluation of traditional, homeopathic, herbal, and other “natural” medicines" (Director: A. Young). Jennifer is now at Library and Archives Canada as the archivist for records from the federal department of health.

Janet Childerhose received her Ph.D. (2010)  in medical anthropology for her dissertation, "Genetic discrimination: Genealogy of an American problem." (Director: M. Lock) She is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, where she investigates the ethical dimensions of pediatric bariatric surgery. Her most recent publication is "Health consumption as work: The home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool,"  JE Childerhose & ME MacDonald, Social Science & Medicine 86(June 2013):1-8.

Hannah Gilbert was awarded her Ph.D. in May 2010 in medical anthropology for her dissertation, “Spinning blood into gold: science, sex work and HIV-2 in Senegal.” (Director: Vinh Kim Nguyen). She also received this year’s Margaret Lock Award, an award given to an SSOM student who demonstrates high academic standing in either the medical anthropology or the medical sociology program.

Raul Necochea received his Ph.D. in the history of medicine after defending his dissertation, “ A history of the medical control of fertility in Peru, 1895-1976.” (Director: A. Tone). Raul began his SSHRC post-doc at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto in January 2010, and has recently accepted a tenure-track position in the Department of Social Medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He will be moving to North Carolina this August.

Wilson Will received his Ph.D. in medical anthropology after defending his dissertation “Making hospital chaplains in an age of biomedicine.” (Director: E. Corin). He will be moving to Texas this summer, having been awarded Rice University’s Medical Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship, a two-year fellowship in interdisciplinary medical humanities at the university’s Humanities Research Center.

Junko Kitanaka , Ph.D. is now a tenured associate professor in the Department of Human Sciences at Keio University. Her dissertation (2006) won multiple prizes, including the American Anthropological Association’s Medical Anthropology Student Association Dissertation Award (2007) and an award from the Japanese Society of Transcultural Psychiatry (2009). Her book, “Society in Distress: the Making of Depression in Contemporary Japan,” is forthcoming with Princeton University Press.

Jason Szabo , M.D., Ph.D. published a book based on his dissertation in the history of medicine (2005; Director: G. Weisz): Incurable and Intolerable: Chronic disease and Slow Death in Nineteenth-Century France. (Rutgers University Press, 2009). He has also accepted a part-time assistant professorship in the history department at McGill.