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Julia Krane, Associate Professor

Krane

Bio

"I tell my students that, in order to become insightful, competent, and intelligent social work practitioners, they need to immerse themselves in the scholarship and at the same time come to understand who they are and what they believe," says Dr. Krane, a Professor at the McGill School of Social Work since 1991. "It is important that students recognize competing voices that construct what is helpful and beneficial – from the scholarship, from their own perspectives as social workers, and from the clients with whom they work. I believe that gifted practitioners recognize and act upon not just the commonalities but the discrepancies between sources of knowledge and the voices from which they emerge." After practicing child protection social work in the arena of child sexual abuse while volunteering at a rape crisis centre, Krane became keenly aware of conflicting dialogues around blame and responsibility that permeated front-line practice responses to sexual abuses against children and women. The contradictory assumptions underlying practices and policies in sexual abuse sparked her interest in pursuing doctoral studies, a theme that continues to permeate her teaching, research and community involvement to date. She is the author of What's Mother Got to do with it? Protecting Children from Sexual Abuse (University of Toronto Press, 2003). In this book, Dr. Krane exposes taken-for-granted maternal responsibilities to respond to children's needs and simultaneous mother-blame. She explicates how the child protection system transforms women as mothers into the protectors of children, outlining the costs and consequences for all involved. Her publications to date examine feminist analyses of mainstream and community child welfare practices, protection practices, and trends in risk assessment, critical analyses of services to battered women and their children, and cautious reflections on the intersection of domestic violence and child protection interventions. Dr. Krane is particularly interested in the contradictory effects of social work practices with vulnerable women and children that emerge when multiple facets of women's identities are relegated to the margins of such practices.

Résumé

Dr. Julia Krane completed an Honors BA in Psychology at the University of Ottawa. Her thesis explored the effects of raising children with hyperactivity on mother-child relationships, maternal well-being and marital satisfaction. Realizing she was interested in pursuing a career that allowed her to work with people on the issues they face in their relationships, Krane moved on to study social work at McGill University (BSW) and the University of Toronto (MSW). Upon graduation, she simultaneously worked in child protection services and established a private practice while volunteering at a rape crisis centre for several years, before pursuing doctoral studies at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Krane pursues qualitative research from a critical perspective. She interrogates front-line practices and their policy contexts through the lenses of intersectionality theory and feminism. In a recent SSHRC funded study on how workers respond to women as mothers in shelters for battered women, Krane uncovered the invisibility of women's experiences of mothering and the conditions under which they mother; she suggested that the focus on women as victims of intimate partner violence drives the practice in such a way as to deny the complexities of women's daily lives as mothers. Further, she exposed the tendency to view maternal relationships with children in a similar way to relations of power by men over women in instances of intimate partner violence. Dr. Krane thus calls for feminist informed practice to embrace multiple facets of women's identities and relationships, recognizing power as fluid and flexible instead of static.

Dr. Julia Krane's teaching draws on the theoretical frameworks that inform her research and scholarship, she insists that an analysis of social location must be central in teaching practice courses in intimate partner violence, family violence, child protection, and research methods. In addition to classroom teaching, Dr. Krane functions as a Clinical Consultant to the McGill Domestic Violence Clinic and a local shelter for battered women and their children and is the interim chair of the Women's Studies program and Advisory Committee of McGill.



Education

Ph.D. (University of Toronto) 1994

MSW (University of Toronto) 1982

BSW (McGill University) 1981

B.A. (University of Ottawa) 1980



Employment

2002-present Associate Professor

School of Social Work, McGill University

2000-2006 Clinical Consultant

McGill Domestic Violence Clinic

1999-2000 Sessional Lecturer

University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work

1999-2004 Clinical Consultant

Auberge Transition, Montreal

1994 – 2002 Assistant Professor

School of Social Work, McGill University

1994 – 1995 Consultant to collectivity

Auberge Transition, Montreal

1991 – 1994 Assistant Professor, non-tenure track contract

School of Social Work, McGill University

Research

Areas of interest

  • Critical approaches to child welfare and child protection
  • Feminist practice responses to intimate partner violence
  • Qualitative research methods

Description of current research

  • Making Gender Visible in Child Welfare: An International Initiative. This IOF SSHRC supported grant seeks to collaborate in the development of a UK based Gender and Child Welfare Network, consolidate the contributions of the Canadian members and to expand the outreach of the Network to include a broad range of Canadian researchers.
  • Constructing Maternal Identities: An Examination of Everyday Practices in Welfare State Organizations. This SSHRC funded project examines the experiences of young mothers, many of whom were poor and parenting alone, in relation to social and educational services specifically targeted to them. As co-investigator Julia's expertise in intimate partner violence provides the leadership for data collection and analyses at a shelter for battered women.
  • Femmes, violences et contextes de vulnérabilité. This CURA grant brings together university researchers and professionals in social services across Quebec with varied interests in domestic violence. Of particular focus are factors that render women more or less vulnerable to violence due to social location. Dr. Krane, a co-investigator, brings to the research grant her expertise in domestic violence, mothering, and child protection, her affiliation with a local battered women's shelter and the McGill Domestic Violence Clinic (MDVC).
  • Engaging mothers and fathers: Challenges for social service practices with parents. This SSHRC funded project proposes to engage in qualitative case studies of three distinct social service settings that respond to the needs of families during times of difficulty with a child: a hospital social service department, a community-based family service agency, and child welfare agency. It is concerned with how both women are constructed as mothers and men as fathers by helping professionals. It aims to offer direction to rethink policies, procedures and practices that unwittingly reproduce both mother blame and the invisibility of fathers in relation to their children's well-being.

Recent grants

2011-2013

Status of Women Canada: Blueprint Project

$200,000

Accessing second-stage services for women who have experienced abuse

Kamateros, M. (PI), Krane, J. (co-investigator)


2010-2011

SSHRC, Aid to Research Workshops and Conferences in Canada

$23,750

Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses

Strega, S. (PI), Krane, J., Callahan, M., Lapierre, S. & Richardson, C.


2007 – 2012

SSHRC Standard Research Grant
$97,500

Engaging mothers and fathers: Challenges for social service practices with parents.
Krane, J., Davies, L., & Featherstone, B.


2007

CRI-VIFF: Volet 2, Rédaction d'articles scientifiques
$4,000

Child protection meets domestic violence: Rethinking maternal responsibilities for care in instances of domestic violence
Krane, J.


2007-2008    
SSHRC International Opportunities Fund (IOF)
$74,977

Making Gender Visible in Child Welfare: An International Initiative. 
Davies, L., Krane, J., Damant, D., Featherstone, B., Scourfield, J., & Hooper, C.


2006-2011 
SSHRC Community University Research Alliances (CURA):         
$1,000,000

Femmes, violences et contextes de vulnérabilité.
PI, Maryse Rinfret Raynor, Université de Montréal. 


2004
FQRSC:
$75,000

Parentalité dans des situations de concomitance de la violence conjugale et des mauvais traitements pouvant être liés à d'autres problèmes sociaux: les points de vue des acteurs sociaux concernés Parentalités.
PI, Dominique Damant, Université de Laval.


2003 – 2006
SSHRC Standard Research Grant:
$131,109

Constructing maternal identities in social, educational, and employment settings. 
Davies, L. & Krane, J., McKinnon, M., & Ahola-Sidaway, J.


2003
McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women Seed Grant:
$3,000

"Constructing Maternal Identities". 
J. Krane & L. Davies.


2001 – 2004
SSHRC Strategic Grant: Women and Social Change.
$102,000

"Implementing the feminist vision: Case studies of four feminist organizations". 
Davies, L., Krane, J., McKinnon, M., & Rains, P.


2001
Immigration and Metropolis, Volet IV.
$6,000

"Violence against ethno racial minority women". 
Krane, J., & Oxman-Martinez, J.


2001
Multiculturalism Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage.
$20,000

"Insights from an intersectional framework: Competing conceptions of conjugal violence in contemporary Canadian society". 
Oxman-Martinez, J., Krane, J., & Corbin, N.


2001
Immigration and Metropolis, Volet IV.
$2,000

"Competing conceptions of conjugal violence". 
Oxman-Martinez, J., & Krane, J.

Publications

Strega, S., Krane, J., Lapierre, S., Richardson, C., and Carlton, R. (Eds) (2013). Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses. Fernwood Press.

Bolen, R., & Krane, J. (2013). What do we really know about maternal “failure to protect” in cases of child sexual abuse? Exposing empirical inadequacies and moving forward. In S. Strega, J. Krane, S. Lapierre, C. Richardson and R. Carlton (eds.), Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses. Fernwood Press.

Carlton, R., & Krane, J. (2013). Take a chance on me: Rethinking risk and maternal failure to protect in cases of child sexual abuse. In S. Strega, J. Krane, S. Lapierre, C. Richardson and R. Carlton (eds.), Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses. Fernwood Press.

Carlton, R., & Krane, J. (2013). Neither shaken nor stirred: The persistence of maternal failure to protect in cases of child sexual abuse. In S. Strega, J. Krane, S. Lapierre, C. Richardson and R. Carlton (eds.), Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses. Fernwood Press.

Krane, J., Strega, S., & Carlton, R. (2013). G-d couldn’t be everywhere so he created mothers: The impossible mandate of maternal protection  or what is now known as “failure to protect”. In S. Strega, J. Krane, S. Lapierre, C. Richardson, and R. Carlton (eds.), Failure to protect: Moving beyond gendered responses. Fernwood Press.

Krane, J., & Carlton, R. (2012). Une pratique à la croisée des chemins: comprendre les femmes en tant que mères en maison d’hébergement. In S. Lapierre & D. Damant (eds.), Regards critiques sur la maternité dans divers contextes sociaux. Sainte-Foy: Presses de l’Université du Québec, 185-204.

Krane, J., & Carlton, R. (2012). La pratique en matière de protection dans les cas d’agression sexuelle d’enfants: Perspectives féministes sur l’intervention auprès de mères non agresseuses. In S. Lapierre & D. Damant (eds.), Regards critiques sur la maternité dans divers contextes sociaux. Sainte-Foy: Presses de l’Université du Québec, 205-227.

Lapierre, S., Krane, J., Damant, D., & Thibault, J. (2012). Négligence à l’endroit des enfant et maternité: un regard féministe. In S. Lapierre & D. Damant (eds.), Regards critiques sur la maternité dans divers contextes sociaux. Sainte-Foy: Presses de l’Université du Québec, 229-249.

Krane, J., Davies, L., Carlton, R., & Mulcahy, M. (2010). The clock starts now: Rethinking attachment theory in child protection practice. In B. Featherstone, CA. Hooper, J. Scourfield & J. Taylor, (eds.), Gender and Child Welfare in Society. Wiley Press, 149-172.

Krane, J., & Carlton, R. (2009). What is so oppressive about protection practice in cases of child sexual abuse? Scratch the surface and we find the oppression of mothers. In S. Strega & J. Carriere (eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and Anti-oppressive Child Welfare Practice. Halifax: Fernwood Press, 187-203.

Krane, J., & Carlton, R. (2008). We’re all women and we’re all going through the same thing: Intersectionality challenges practice in a battered women's shelter. In S. Arcand, D. Damant, S. Gravel & E. Harper (eds.), Violences faites aux femmes. Sainte-Foy : Presses de l'Université du Québec (253-272).

Lapierre, S., Krane, J., Damant, D., & Thibault, J. (2008). Maternité et négligence à l’endroit des enfants: un lien à ne pas ‘négliger’. In C. Parent, S. Drapeau, M. Brousseau & E. Pouliot (eds.), Visages multiples de la parentalité. Sainte-Foy : Presses de l’Université du Québec, 361-384

Krane, J., & Caplan, T. (2007).  Supporting women, supporting mothers: Group intervention with abused women.  In C. Chamberland, S. Léveillé and N. Trocmé (eds.), Des enfants à protéger, des adultes à aider : deux univers à rapprocher.  Sainte-Foy: Presses de l'Université du Québec, (205-221).

Krane, J., & Davies, L. (2007).  Mothering under difficult circumstances: Challenges to working with battered women.  Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, 22(1), 23-38.

Davies, L., Krane, J., Collings, S., & Wexler, S.  (2007). Developing mothering narratives in child protection practice.  Journal of Social Work Practice, 21(1), 23-34.

Krane, J., & Davies, L.  (2006). La sororité n’est pas suffisante : L’invisibilité de la maternité dans la pratique adoptée en maisons d’aide et d’hébergement pour femmes victimes de violence The International Journal of Victimology/ Le Journal International De Victimologie, Year 4(3), http://www.jidv.com/KraneDavies-JIDV2006_13.htm

Davies, L., & Krane, J. (2006).  Collaborate with caution: Protecting children, helping mothers.  Critical Social Policy, 26(2), 412-425.

Oxman-Martinez, J., & Krane, J. (2005). Un décalage entre théorie et practique? Violence conjugale et femmes issues des minorities ethniques. International Journal of Victimology, 3(3)1-10.

Krane, J.  (2003). What’s Mother got to do with it? Protecting Children from Sexual Abuse.  Toronto: The University of Toronto Press Incorporated. 

Davies, L., & Krane, J.  (2003). Critical reflections on practice with battered women: Insights from Maya’s story.  Atlantis: A Women’s Studies Journal, 28(1), 63-71.

Davies, L., Collings, S., & Krane, J.  (2003). Making mothers visible: Implications for social work practice and education in child welfare.  Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, 5(2), 158-169.

Krane, J., & Davies, L.  (2002). Sisterhood is not enough: The invisibility of mothering in battered women’s shelters.  Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, 17(2), 167-190.

Davies, L., Krane, J., McKinnon, M., Rains, P., & Mastronardi, L. (2002). Beyond the state: Conceptualizing protection in community settings. Social Work Education, 21(6), 623-633).

Krane, J., & Davies, L. (2000).  Mothering and child protection practice: Rethinking risk assessment. Child and Family Social Work, 5(1), 35-45.

Krane, J., Oxman-Martinez, J., & Ducey, K.  (2000). Violence against women and ethnoracial minority women: Examining assumptions about ethnicity and “race”.  Canadian Ethnic Studies, 32(3), 1-18.

Oxman-Martinez, J., Krane, J., Wehbi, S., & Rowe, B.  (2000). Joint police/social work intervention in conjugal violence: A critical exploration. Intervention, 111, 34-43.

Krane, J. (2000).  Child sexual abuse. In L. Code, (ed.), Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. London: Sage.

Davies, L., Fox, K., Krane, J., & Shragge, E.  (2002). Community child welfare: Examples from Quebec.  In B. Wharf, (ed.), Community Work Approaches to Child Welfare. Peterborough: Broadview Press, (63-81).

Krane, J.  (1997).  Least disruptive and intrusive course of action for whom? Insights from feminist analysis of practice in cases of child sexual abuse.  In J. Pulkingham & G. Ternowetsky, (eds.), Rethinking child and family policy: Struggles, strategies and options.  Halifax: Fernwood Press, (58-74).

Krane, J.  (1996). Violence against women in intimate relations: Insights from cross-cultural analyses Transcultural Psychiatric Research Review, 33(4), 435-465.

Davies, L., & Krane, J. (1996). Shaking the legacy of mother-blaming: No easy task for child welfare. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 7(2), 3-22.

Krane, J., & Davies, L.  (1996). Mother-blame in child sexual abuse: A look at dominant culture, writings, and practices.  Textual Studies in Canada, 7, 21-35.

Krane, J.  (1991). Feminist thinking as an aid to teaching social work research.  Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, 6(4), 53-70.

Krane, J.  (1990). Patriarchal biases in the conceptualization of child incestuous abuse: A review and critique from a radical feminist perspective. Canadian Social Work Review, 7(2), 183-196.

Krane, J.  (1990). Explanations of child sexual abuse: A review and critique from a feminist perspective.  Canadian Review of Social Policy, 25, 11-19.

Courses offered

SWRK 423

3 credits
Social Work Research.

Social Work: Appraising and analyzing social work practice research, including the perspectives of the authors, the literature reviewed, the practice questions, the research methodology and analysis and the implications of the findings for practice.

Offered by: Social Work

  • Restrictions: Limited to BSW U3 students. Not open to students who have taken SWRK 401.
  • Terms
    • Winter 2015
  • Instructors
    • Julia Krane

SWRK 628

3 credits
Violence against Women.

Social Work: Discussion of the psychological, social and political factors which create and maintain a society where male violence against the women they love occurs. A feminist theoretical perspective will be developed and analyzed. Treatment approaches will be considered focussing on interventive strategies to help both the battered and the batterers.

Offered by: Social Work

  • Terms
    • Fall 2014
  • Instructors
    • Julia Krane

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