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Nicole Ives, Associate Professor

Nicole Ives

Bio

Nicole Ives began her academic life with a BA in foreign area studies from Barnard College. Since then, she has nurtured a passion for issues affecting immigrant and refugee populations combined with a pursuit of social justice and societal change. Ives came to McGill from the USA, where she taught courses at the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers. Informed by her own experience of the migration process from the inside, she has deepened her commitment to studying immigration and acculturation from an academic perspective.

Résumé

Nicole Ives first took an in-depth look at the issues facing refugees during a year of undergraduate study in Denmark where she volunteered at the Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims. Back in Copenhagen after completing her MSW, Ives worked as a volunteer with the Danish Refugee Council and the Danish Red Cross, where she taught English to asylum seekers. Ives returned to the USA with an idea for a dissertation: refugee integration in different countries of resettlement.

Ives, a qualitative researcher with a focus on refugee and immigrant issues and issues of acculturation, explores the lived experience of policies. Her research has included examining outcomes for refugees that have been sponsored by religious congregations, the effects of US immigration policy on Liberian refugee families, and Bosnian refugee resettlement in the United States and Denmark. Ives teaches Anti-Oppression Social Work Practice and Qualitative Research Methods, participates on the BSW Program Task Force, and is a member of the First Nations and Inuit Social Work Program Steering Group.



Education

Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) 2005

M.S.W. (University of Pennsylvania) 1996

Danish International Study Program (Copenhagen University) 1991

B.A. (Barnard College) 1991



Employment

2012-present Associate Professor

McGill University, Faculty of Arts, School of Social Work

2006-2012 Assistant Professor

McGill University, Faculty of Arts, School of Social Work

2005-2006 Adjunct Professor

Rutgers, The State University of NJ, School of Social Work

2006 Adjunct Professor

University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Work

2003-2004 Co-teacher

University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Work

2000-2002 Teaching Assistant

University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Work

2005-2006 Research Associate

R&P Associates, Ltd., Alexandria, VA

Research

Areas of interest

Migration:

  • Refugee/immigrant resettlement practice and policy
  • Issues facing asylum seeking populations
  • Roles of faith-based organizations in resettlement
  • Comparative migration policy
  • Integration of culture and resettlement

Indigenous social welfare:

  • Impact of social and educational programs and policies
  • Secondary school student retention
  • Social work education with Indigenous Peoples
  • Connections between culture and pedagogy

Description of current research

Nicole Ives’ current qualitative research projects include understanding collaboration between refugee resettlement/ethnic organizations and mainstream, government-funded agencies; exploring cultural perceptions to health care services for individuals with HIV and how they shape health outcomes; exploring Inuit conceptualizations of parent/family involvement in secondary school in Kuujjuaq, Nunavik; examining experiences of newcomer women in Canada across the homelessness spectrum; and assessing the needs of children who have been involved in armed conflict in a resettlement context.


Recent Grants

2010-2011

Uncovering invisibility(ies): Understanding Experiences of Newcomer Women across the Homelessness Spectrum (HRSDC) 

$20,000

Principal Investigator (Calgary site): Walsh, C.; Co Investigators (Montreal site): Hanley, J., Ives, N.


2010-2012

Community partnerships for educational success: Exploring Inuit conceptualizations of parent/family involvement in secondary school in Nunavik (SSHRC)

$16,925

 

Principal Investigator: Ives, N.; Co Investigators: Sinha, V., Beauregard, F., Moller, S., Smith, D.-L., Thomson, W.; Collaborators: Lamb-Parker, F., Denov, M.


2009-2011

Community capability and development in Nunavik: Mobilizing knowledge in the transition to self government (SSHRC)                       
 

 $147,458

Principal Investigator: Ives, N.; Co Investigators: Thomson, W., Sinha, V.


2009-2012

Decline in Sexual Abuse Cases Investigated by the Canadian Child Welfare Systems (SSHRC)

  $213,331

 

Principal Investigator: Collin-Vezina, D.; Co Investigators: Trocmé, N., Walsh, C.; Collaborator: Ives, N.


2009

Partnership for Aboriginal Child Welfare (Community University Research Alliance LOI) (SSHRC)           

$20,000

Principal Investigator: Trocmé, N.; Co-Investigators: Blackstock, C., Bennett, M., Sinha, V., Collin-Vézina, D., Ives, N.
 


2008

Adaptation of the ‘Developing Families Project’: Recreating Home, School, Community Partnerships For First Nations and Inuit Academic Achievement (SSHRC)

   $4,000

Principal Investigator: Ives, N.


2008-2011

Community Capability and Development in Nunavik (SSHRC)

   $40,000

Principal Investigator: Thomson, W.; Co Investigators: Sinha, V., Ives, N.

Publications

Peer-reviewed journal articles:

Sjollema, S. D., Hordyk, S. R., Walsh, C. A., Hanley, J., & Ives, N. (In press). Found poetry – Finding home: A qualitative study of homeless immigrant women. Journal of Poetry Therapy, 25, 4.

Durst, D., & Ives, N. (2012). Social work education in Canada’s North: Capacity building through social work.  Journal of Comparative Social Work, 1.http://jcsw.no/local/media/jcsw/docs/jcsw_issue_2012_1_8_essay.pdf

Ives, N., Sinha, V., Leman, D., Goren, A., Levy-Powell, R., & Thomson, W. (2012). Exploring the intersection of culture and education in Nunavik. Journal of Comparative Social Work, 1.http://jcsw.no/local/media/jcsw/docs/jcsw_issue_2012_1_3_article.pdf

Mah, H., & Ives, N. (2011). It takes a village: Perspectives from a multidisciplinary team addressing the needs of HIV+ refugees in Canada. Refuge, 27, 75-88.

Ives, N., & Witmer Sinha, J. (2010). The religious congregation as community partner in refugee resettlement: An overview of theory and practice for social workers. Canadian Social Work, 12, 1, 210-217.

Franz, B., & Ives, N. (2010). Wading through muddy water: Policy challenges to refugee family restoration in resettlement. IMIS Beiträge, 36, 139-159.

Ives, N., Witmer Sinha, J., & Cnaan, R. (2010). Who is welcoming the stranger? Exploring faith-based service provision to refugees in Philadelphia. Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, 29, 71-89.

Ives, N., & Aitken, O. (2009). From colonized region to globalized region? Challenges to addressing social issues in Nunavik in the transition to regional government. Indigenous Policy Journal, 20, 3. http://ipjournal.wordpress.com/2009/12/16/from-colonized-region-to-globalized-region/

Ives, N., & Aitken, O. (2008). Technology and access: Responding to the social work education needs of First Nations and Inuit Communities. Social Work Education, 27, 686-694.

Ives, N. (2007). More than a “good back”: Looking for integration in refugee resettlement. Refuge, 24, 2, 54-63.

Ives, N., Aitken, O., Loft, M., & Phillips, M. (2007). Rethinking social work education for Indigenous students: Creating space for multiple ways for multiple ways of knowing and learning. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 3, 4, 13-20.

Book chapters:

Ives, N., & Loft, M. (In press). Building bridges with Indigenous communities through social work education. In M. Gray., J. Coates, M. Yellow Bird, and T. Hetherington (Eds.), Indigenous social work around the world II: Decolonising social work. London: Ashgate.

Estes, R., Azaola, E., & Ives, N. (2005). The commercial sexual exploitation of children in North America. In S. W. Cooper, R. J. Estes, A. P. Giardino, N. D. Kellogg, and V. I. Vieth (Eds.), Medical, legal, and social science aspects of child sexual exploitation: A comprehensive review of pornography, prostitution, and internet crimes (297-335). St. Louis, MO: G. W. Medical Publishing.

Ives, N., & Estes. R. (2005). US Federal laws relating to sexually exploited and commercially sexually exploited children (Supplementary CD-ROM). In S. W. Cooper, R. J. Estes, A. P. Giardino, N. D. Kellogg, and V. I. Vieth (Eds.), Medical, legal, and social science aspects of child sexual exploitation: A comprehensive review of pornography, prostitution, and internet crimes. St. Louis, MO: G. W. Medical Publishing.

Ives, N., & Estes, R. (2005). International agreements, covenants and declarations relating to children and families, including to sexually exploited and commercially sexually exploited children (Supplementary CD-ROM). In S. W. Cooper, R. J. Estes, A. P. Giardino, N. D. Kellogg, and V. I. Vieth (Eds.), Medical, legal, and social science aspects of child sexual exploitation: A comprehensive review of pornography, prostitution, and internet crimes. St. Louis, MO: G. W. Medical Publishing.

 

Courses Offered

SWRK 220

3 credits
History & Philosophy of Social Work.

Social Work: Historical, theoretical and philosophical base of social work which includes the role of social work in the social welfare, modalities of practice, professional codes of ethics, and human rights legislation.

Offered by: Social Work

  • Restrictions: Limited to BSW U1 and 2-year BSW students. Not open to students who have taken SWRK 240.
  • Terms
    • Fall 2014
  • Instructors
    • Nicole Ives

 

SWRK 400

3 credits
Policy and Practice for Refugees.

Social Work: Refugee-generating conflicts, international and national responses are considered. Canadian policy, history and response to refugees are analyzed. Theory-grounded practice with refugees is examined, including community organizing and direct service delivery to individuals and families.

Offered by: Social Work

  • Restrictions: Limited to BSW U3, 2-year BSW, and U3 non-Social work students
  • Terms
    • Winter 2015
  • Instructors
    • Nicole Ives

SWRK 620

3 credits
Migration and Social Work.

Social Work: Informing practice through examination of how migration's social, economic, political, legal, cultural aspects shape lives of those migrating voluntarily or involuntarily to Canada. Historical context of immigration policies, acculturation frameworks, different models of service provision in resettlement. Intersecting oppressions of status, ethnicity, gender, class, age, sexual orientation and differential ability.

Offered by: Social Work

  • Terms
    • Winter 2015
  • Instructors
    • Jill Hanley

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