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MISt student handbook 2014-2015

Dear MISt students,

Welcome to the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) and to our new Master of Information Studies (MISt). You have made the decision to study in a program that will give you access to a wide spectrum of career options. To orient you to the program and assist in course selection, we have prepared this handbook.

Please note that this handbook is not intended to replace communication with your academic advisor. To discuss courses, program options and career plans, please contact your advisor.

Information for new students

As a new student in the MISt program, you will attend the MISt Introduction Program on August 29, 2014 which will provide you with more information on the program and the School. In addition, you are encouraged to familiarize yourself with the students section of our website. The following section contains key information for new students.

 

ORIENTATION

> MISt Introduction Program. All incoming MISt students. Aug. 29, 2014.
> McGill Graduate Orientation. For information, visit McGill's Graduate Orientation page. Sept. 2, 2014.
> McGill International Student Orientation & receptions. Range of events in Aug. & Sept. More info

 

SIS MISSION, VISION & HISTORY

The School has a distinguished history, with programs offered at McGill since 1897. The mission of the School of Information Studies is the advancement of learning through education, scholarship, and service in Library and Information Studies. As a student of the School, you're now part of our story. Take a moment to get to know the School's roots and goals.

> SIS mission, vision and history

 

GETTING STARTED @ MCGILL

Minerva

Minerva is McGill's web-based information system for students, faculty, and staff. You will register for courses in Minerva, update personal information, etc. Please maintain your current and permanent addresses and phone numbers on Minerva as soon as you have new information. Minerva login

ID Cards

You can obtain your ID card after registering in courses. Register in at least 1 course and wait 24 hours after registration. > Instructions for McGill Student ID Cards

 

POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Academic integrity

Since spring 2011, incoming graduate students must complete a mandatory online academic integrity tutorial accessed through MINERVA's Student Menu->Academic Integrity Tutorial. New students must complete the tutorial within their first semester, or a Hold will placed on their record. 

McGill student email correspondence policy

In accordance with McGill email policy, you are required to use your McGill email address (versus a personal email address) to correspond with the School’s administration and instructors and with McGill. As well, you are responsible to check this email address periodically throughout the duration of your studies for emails from the School and from McGill.

Forms, guidelines, and procedures

You’ll find links to the internal funding forms, the McGill Handbook of Student Rights & Responsibilities, the SIS social media guidelines, etc. on the School’s Forms & guidelines page.

 

SERVICES

In addition to the range of services listed on the SIS website services & resources page, we'd like to highlight the following resources:

Special needs and/or medical problems

The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) offers you support if difficulties and impairments are hindering your academic performance while at McGill, or if you require assistance with access. It is highly recommended that you contact the OSD even if you are being followed by a medical, mental health or counseling unit, as the OSD will be able to guide you in reducing the impact your diagnosis may have on your academic performance, attendance or learning. > McGill Office for Students with Disabilities

Physical & mental health

Your health is important. Don't hesitate to make use of health resources at McGill. Visit the services & resources page for links to campus health services.

> SIS directory of services & resources

> PGSS health & dental plan
> McGill International Student Health Insurance. McGill requires all international students and their accompanying dependents to participate in the compulsory McGill International Health Insurance Plan, administered by International Student Services.

Employment

Students are strongly encouraged to build their CVs with work and volunteer experience while in the program, and to make an early connection with the McGill Career Planning Services. More information on working & career resources for SIS students:
> SIS student page on working, including McGill Work Study
> Career information for SIS students & graduates

 

GETTING AROUND MCGILL

> McGill Virtual Campus Tour
> Map of McGill branch libraries

 

USEFUL MCGILL LINKS FOR NEW STUDENTS


SIS important dates

Role of your academic advisor

Your advisor’s name and contact information is in the welcome email you received from the Director. If you have misplaced this information, please contact the Administrative and Student Affairs Coordinator, Ms. Kathryn Hubbard.

The School of Information Studies assigns academic advisors to all full-time and part-time students. This ensures that you are in touch with at least one faculty member who can give you advice about your career plans, course selection, and answer questions about the program, the field, related professions, and other issues affecting your academic life.

At the MISt Introduction Program, on August 29th, you will have a group meeting with your advisor. This meeting will give you a chance to get to know your advisor, ask questions, and meet fellow students.

During your studies, you may contact your advisor at any time to book a one-on-one advising session. You are encouraged to contact your advisor to receive advice regarding any aspects of your academic and professional plans. Whether you select the Course-based Stream or the Research Project Stream, you should meet your advisor to discuss your course selection and research plans.

Please note: while your advisor provides guidance in the completion of your academic plan, it is your responsibility to ensure you complete the MISt program requirements.

For questions about tuition fees, funding, transcripts, procedures for course registration, etc., contact the SIS Administrative and Student Affairs Coordinator, Ms. Kathryn Hubbard, Email, or by phone: 514.398.4204, ext. 0742#.


Overview of MISt program

The Master of Information Studies consists of a 48-credit non-thesis program, accredited by the American Library Association. This program is designed to prepare you for the broad field of information studies and has two streams: Course-based and Research Project.

  • The course-based stream offers courses designed for gaining professional skills and knowledge.
  • The research project stream is designed to gain research experience. Although there is no thesis involved, the research project is broken down in various steps and courses and involves writing an in-depth research report.

The program, regardless of the stream, provides the intellectual foundation for careers as information professionals; fosters competencies in managing information and knowledge resources; advocates the ideal of equal access to information; promotes the appropriate use of technology in meeting information needs; encourages research in the field of library and information studies; and cultivates commitment to professional service for individuals, organizations, and society.

The program is comprised of three types of courses: required courses that all MISt students need to take; complementary courses, some specific to each stream and others common to both streams; and elective courses if you wish to take courses outside the MISt program.

 COURSE PLAN

In the first semester, (Fall 2014) all full time MISt students should complete the required courses (12 credits):

  • GLIS 601 Information and Society
  • GLIS 607 Organization of Information
  • GLIS 617 Information System Design
  • GLIS 619 Information Behaviour and Resources

During the first semester, you will have to select one of the two streams and select complementary courses among the following courses (click link, below). Please note: not all courses are offered every year. For current course availability, refer to the MISt course timetables or Minerva Dynamic Schedule.

Click to view courses

Stream A - Course-based

3 credits

GLIS

602

(3)

Integrating Research and Practice (to be taken in the last semester or Winter 2016)

And 21-33 credits from the following:

GLIS

608

(3)

Classification and Cataloguing.

GLIS

609

(3)

Metadata & Access.

GLIS

611

(3)

Research Principles and Analysis.

GLIS

612

(3)

History of Books and Printing.

GLIS

613

(3)

Library and Archival History.

GLIS

614

(3)

Public Libraries.

GLIS

615

(3)

Reference & Information Services.

GLIS

616

(3)

Information Retrieval.

GLIS

620

(3)

Information Agency Management.

GLIS

626

(3)

Usability Analysis and Assessment.

GLIS

632

(3)

Library Systems.

GLIS

633

(3)

Multimedia Systems.

GLIS

634

(3)

Web System Design and Management.

GLIS

636

(3)

Government Information.

GLIS

637

(3)

Scientific & Technical Information.

GLIS

638

(3)

Business Information.

GLIS

639

(3)

Introduction to Museology.

GLIS

641

(3)

Archival Description and Access.

GLIS

642

(3)

Preservation Management.

GLIS

644

(3)

Descriptive Bibliography.

GLIS

645

(3)

Archival Principles and Practice.

GLIS

649

(3)

Digital Curation.

GLIS

650

(3)

Digital Libraries.

GLIS

651

(3)

Humanities and Social Science Information.

GLIS

655

(3)

Language and Information.

GLIS

656

(3)

Abstracting and Indexing.

GLIS

657

(3)

Database Design & Development.

GLIS

660

(3)

Records Management.

GLIS

661

(3)

Knowledge Management.

GLIS

662

(3)

Intellectual Capital.

GLIS

663

(3)

Knowledge Taxonomies.

GLIS

664

(3)

Knowledge Networks.

GLIS

665

(3)

Competitive Intelligence.

GLIS

671

(3)

Health Sciences Information.

GLIS

672

(3)

Law Information.

GLIS

673

(3)

Bioinformatics Resources.

GLIS

679

(3)

Information Literacy.

GLIS

689

(3)

Selected Topics.

GLIS

690

(3)

Information Policy.

GLIS

691

(3)

Special Topics 1.

GLIS

692

(3)

Special Topics 2.

GLIS

699

(3)

Practicum.

 

Stream B - Research Project

12 credits from the following:

GLIS

603

(3)

Research Project 1.

GLIS

604

(3)

Research Project 2.

GLIS

647

(6)

Research Project 3.

 

3 credits from the following:

EDEM

690

(3)

Research Methods: Philosophy and Practice.

EDPE

605

(3)

Research Methods.

GLIS

611

(3)

Research Principles and Analysis.

 

 

And 9-21 credits from the following:

GLIS

602

(3)

Integrating Research and Practice.

GLIS

608

(3)

Classification and Cataloguing.

GLIS

609

(3)

Metadata & Access.

GLIS

611

(3)

Research Principles and Analysis.

GLIS

612

(3)

History of Books and Printing.

GLIS

613

(3)

Library and Archival History.

GLIS

614

(3)

Public Libraries.

GLIS

615

(3)

Reference & Information Services.

GLIS

616

(3)

Information Retrieval.

GLIS

620

(3)

Information Agency Management.

GLIS

626

(3)

Usability Analysis and Assessment.

GLIS

633

(3)

Multimedia Systems.

GLIS

634

(3)

Web System Design and Management.

GLIS

636

(3)

Government Information.

GLIS

637

(3)

Scientific & Technical Information.

GLIS

638

(3)

Business Information.

GLIS

639

(3)

Introduction to Museology.

GLIS

641

(3)

Archival Description and Access.

GLIS

642

(3)

Preservation Management.

GLIS

644

(3)

Descriptive Bibliography.

GLIS

645

(3)

Archival Principles and Practice.

GLIS

649

(3)

Digital Curation.

GLIS

650

(3)

Digital Libraries.

GLIS

651

(3)

Humanities and Social Science Information.

GLIS

655

(3)

Language and Information.

GLIS

656

(3)

Abstracting and Indexing.

GLIS

657

(3)

Database Design & Development.

GLIS

660

(3)

Records Management.

GLIS

661

(3)

Knowledge Management.

GLIS

662

(3)

Intellectual Capital.

GLIS

663

(3)

Knowledge Taxonomies.

GLIS

664

(3)

Knowledge Networks.

GLIS

665

(3)

Competitive Intelligence.

GLIS

671

(3)

Health Sciences Information.

GLIS

672

(3)

Law Information.

GLIS

673

(3)

Bioinformatics Resources.

GLIS

679

(3)

Information Literacy.

GLIS

689

(3)

Selected Topics.

GLIS

690

(3)

Information Policy.

GLIS

691

(3)

Special Topics 1.

GLIS

692

(3)

Special Topics 2.

GLIS

699

(3)

Practicum.

 

 

Elective Courses

You are eligible to take up to 12 credits of graduate-level courses offered outside of the School. Proposed courses are to fall under the School's criteria of acceptable elective courses. For more information, speak with your academic advisor. Please note: the total number of permissible courses will also depend on the fulfilment of SIS program requirements and are subject to approval by the School, McGill Graduate Studies, and the external institution.

> Elective courses outside SIS

 

AREAS OF INTEREST

You are strongly encouraged, especially if you select the course-based stream, to identify areas that interest you as early as possible and in consultation with your academic advisor, in order to plan your course selection accordingly. An area of interest corresponds to a particular set of courses in which you can gain specific skills and knowledge that interest you without a particular number of credits attached to it. The areas of interest described in the link below are suggestions based on current course offerings that may change in the course of your studies as new courses may be added and existing courses may be deleted.  

> MISt areas of interest and recommended courses

 

PRACTICUM

The Practicum is a 3 credit course (GLIS 699) which gives students the opportunity to gain professional skills in supervised field practice, applying their theoretical knowledge base and learning gained over the course of the program. The program is offered in the Winter term, and is intended for second-year students in their final term.

In your second year (Fall 2015), you must attend a required Practicum information session if you are interested in enrolling in the Practicum program in the following Winter semester. For more information, please visit the Practicum section of the SIS website.

 


COURSE-BASED STREAM TYPICAL STUDENT PATH

Term 1

Required courses

  • GLIS 601 Information and Society
  • GLIS 607 Organization of Information
  • GLIS 617 Information System Design
  • GLIS 619 Information Behaviour and Resources

Term 2

Complementary courses and/or elective courses (12 credits)

Term 3

Complementary courses and/or electives courses (12 credits)

Term 4

GLIS 602 Integrating Research and Practice (3 credits)

GLIS 699 Practicum (3 credits) - Optional

Complementary courses and/or electives courses (9 or 6 credits)

 

RESEARCH PROJECT STREAM

The Research Project Stream is intended for students interested in gaining experience in developing and executing a research project from beginning to end. The final goal is to have a paper that can be published in a professional or scholarly journal. This option is designed for students who have a clearly defined topic, can find a supervisor, and can meet tight deadlines. This option is worth 15 credits of coursework. The project is broken down in three courses: GLIS 603 for writing a literature review and research proposal; GLIS  604 for collecting data: and GLIS 647 for analyzing data and writing a research report.

Students interested in registering for the Research Project Stream should discuss this with their advisor as soon as possible after registration in the MISt program in order to identify potential research supervisor(s). To approach a prospective research supervisor, students should write and submit a summary of their project in 1-2 pages (500- 1000 words). They should also plan their path of studies carefully with the guidance of the instructor of GLIS 601 Foundations in Information Studies by taking into account the following steps and requirements:

Typical path in the Research Project Stream

Term 1 – Required Courses

  • GLIS 601 Information and Society
  • GLIS 607 Organization of Information
  • GLIS 617 Information System Design
  • GLIS 619 Information Behaviour and Resources

Term 2

  • GLIS 603 (3) Research Project 1

AND

3 credits from the following:

  • GLIS 611 (3) Research Principles and Analysis
    • DEM 690 (3) Research Methods: Philosophy and Practice
    • EDPE 605 (3) Research Methods

AND

Complementary and/or elective courses (6 credits)

Term 3

  • GLIS 604 (3) Research Project 2
  • GLIS 647 (6) Research Project 3 (ideally this course is taken over two terms)

Complementary and/or elective courses (6 credits)

Term 4

GLIS 647 (6)

Complementary and/or elective courses (9 credits)

 


Course registration guide

As a full-time student entering the MISt program, you simply need to register in the four required courses in your first term (Fall 2014):

  • GLIS 601 Information and Society
  • GLIS 607 Organization of Information
  • GLIS 617 Information System Design (also register for corresponding lab section)
  • GLIS 619 Information Behaviour and Resources

You will register for courses through McGill's Minerva system.

During your first term, you will select the course-based or research-based stream. In both streams you will develop an individualized program of study in consultation with your advisor comprised of a set of complementary and elective courses.

Registration process

Full-time students

Step I: SIS preapproval process

All of your course sections must be pre-approved in the registration system by the SIS Administrative & Student Affairs coordinator prior to course registration in Minerva.

  1. Consult the timetables (see links) and email your preferred MISt course sections to Kathryn Hubbard, the Admin. & Student Affairs at the general SIS email address: Email. Be sure to include the course number, title, section, and CRN as well as the corresponding lab for your GLIS 617 course selection.
  2. Space permitting*, Kathryn will code the courses in the registration system to enable you to register after July 8. She will notify you by email to let you know a space will be held for you in the class.

* Note: Courses are pre-approved for registration on a first-come first-served basis. Don’t delay in contacting Kathryn with your preferred sections for pre-approval, even if Minerva shows open seats in a class. Seat counts in Minerva will update once registration for new students opens on July 8.

Step II: Registration in Minerva

  1. After registration opens on July 8, register for your approved Fall courses in Minerva, and the Fall 2014 REGN CRN (CRN 2334), and Winter REGN CRN (CRN 2262). Approval is not required for the REGN CRN and there is no charge.  (See “What is a REGN code?" below)

Part-time students (1-3 courses per term)

  1. Contact your advisor to discuss your part-time course plan for the year. Incoming part-time students should take 1 to 3 required courses from the required courses listed above.
  2. Consult the timetable and email your MISt require required course sections (see above) to Kathryn Hubbard. Be sure to include the course number, title, section, and CRN as well as corresponding lab section for GLIS 617.
  3. When your course plan has been approved by your advisor, forward your approval email to Kathryn Hubbard. Indicate course numbers (and titles), course sections and lab sections.        
  4. Kathryn will notify you by email when your course sections and labs have been given departmental approval for registration, space permitting.
  5. After July 8, register for your 4 Fall courses in Minerva, the Fall 2014 REGN CRN (CRN 2334), and Winter REGN CRN (CRN 2262) (See “What is a REGN code?" below)

 


What is a REGN code?

The "REGN" registration confirmation code is an administrative code McGill uses to confirm registration for graduate students. Registration in Minerva of the REGN registration confirmation course is mandatory for all graduate students each term. Notes: Advisor approval is not required prior to REGN registration. There is no charge associated with registering for the REGN.

For comprehensive McGill registration information and procedures, consult the McGill Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies Registration page.

 

If you have any questions about registration, fee payments, dates, or if you are experiencing problems with registration, please contact:

Kathryn Hubbard, Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Office: 3661 Peel St., Room 100
Tel: (514) 398-4204, ext. 0742# | Fax: (514) 398-7193 | sis [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email)

School & administrative office

 

Contacts

>Staff    >Faculty   >SIS contact guide

Facilities

The School is located at 3661 Peel Street. The School is home to administrative, faculty, PhD and student group offices, a seminar room, and various common spaces and lounge areas for student use. The majority of classes and the SIS/Graduate IT Lab are located in the Faculty of Education Building at 3700 McTavish, adjacent to the School. A telephone is available for local calls in Rm. B14.

>More about facilities & SIS student areas

Hours

The School’s office hours are listed on the School’s contact page. Please note that the School's building and office hours can vary, in particular during the summer and holiday seasons.

Faxes

Fax service will be given as time permits during the normal work period. The office staff will send faxes for students at the following rates:

  • $.25 per page in Quebec/Montreal
  • $.50 per page outside Quebec in Canada or the US
  • $1.00 per page outside North America
  • $.25 per page for faxes received

Mail/Package receipt

  • With prior arrangement, the office staff will accept special mail or packages delivered to the School for a student during the work day. You will be advised by email of their receipt.

Mail slots

  • All students are given a mail slot at 3661 Peel St. Names are listed alphabetically. Due to the public nature of these slots, nothing of value or of a confidential nature should be put there.

McGill student email correspondence policy

As mentioned in the section above, in accordance with McGill policy, the School corresponds with all students through their McGill email address



Technology

TECHNOLOGY FAQ

Should I buy a computer?

Students are urged to purchase a laptop computer. While there are computers available to students in the Library and the various computer labs in the Education building, these facilities are shared by both undergraduate and graduate students.

Having a laptop will ensure flexibility and mobility; McGill's wireless network covers most of the campus, so with a laptop a student can work from almost anywhere.

The software requirements for SIS programs are modest, so any relatively modern laptop will be adequate. When purchasing a laptop, students should keep in mind that some tasks they will have to complete (such as drawing diagrams and working with presentations or photos) may be difficult to accomplish on a small screen. While a laptop with a 13" screen would be adequate, the smaller screens provided on today's netbooks may be difficult to work with.

Can I use a computer running Mac OS X or Linux?

Students may use whichever operating system they are comfortable with. However, students who use Macs or Linux machines at home must be aware of the logistical problems of moving files between non-Windows computers and Windows-based computers. Some of these problems may be solved through the purchase of PC emulation software that makes a Mac or Linux computer more compatible with Windows and by saving files in a generic format.

Note that while the School does not support non-Windows computers, the ICS Helpdesk does offer support on Mac OS X systems. They do not offer Linux support.

What should I know about technology before arriving?

Each year the School greets students with varying levels of technological savvy. That being said, students with little or no background in using Windows-based computers will be at a disadvantage. Students should be comfortable in the following environment:

1. Windows operating system:
  • Accessing various drives and creating folders (directories) and sub-folders (sub-directories) using My Computer and/or Windows Explorer. Do not underestimate these skills. File management is the number one problem facing incoming students.
  • Saving, copying, moving and deleting files and folders.
  • Viewing the properties of files and folders (for example, how many megabytes of information are in a particular folder).
  • Finding and running (executing) programs.
  • Configuring print setting to print 2 or more pages on a single page (aka 2- or n-uping a document).  
2. Office software: Students should be able to use the Microsoft Office suite of software, especially Word, PowerPoint and Excel.

 

3. Web browsers: Students should know how to use Microsoft Internet Explorer and Firefox, especially how to print and save files within these programs. 

It is also recommended that students have some knowledge of:

  • Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), the language for constructing web pages.
  • Database software (Microsoft Access etc.)
  • Spreadsheet software (Excel, etc.)

There are many places to learn about these programs and areas. One of the best ways is to practice either on your own computer or using the public computer workstations available around campus. The more students learn before arrival, the easier it will be to settle into SIS programs.

 

SIS WIKI

You can access the SIS Wiki as soon as you have a McGill email address. This is a collaborative, unofficial SIS community information spot used to host the shared internal School events calendar, knowledge continuity resources for student groups, and more. You can use the web form to activate your editing access after your first visit to the Wiki.

 

> More information on technology at McGill and SIS


Student groups & involvement

The School is home to the McGill Information Studies Student Association (MISSA), student chapters of professional associations, student groups, and reading groups. Involvement in SIS student groups and at SIS events will add to your experience and create connections which will benefit you in years to come. We encourage you to get involved! 

> McGill Information Studies Student Association (MISSA)
> SIS student groups, chapters, and associations site

EVENTS

MISSA and other SIS groups and committees organize a number of annual events, including a welcome event, used book sale, Career Fair, the Web 2.U Symposium, the Association of Canadian Archivists Symposium, and the EBSI-SIS Doctoral Symposium. Student group activities provide great CV-building opportunities for leadership, event coordination, networking, and general volunteer experience. Consider getting involved!

As well, we encourage you to engage with the School through events and talks such as the SIS Research Seminars. These events give you the opportunity to learn about advancements in the field, ask questions, and connect with other students and faculty.

Student group and School events are listed by event organizers on the SIS shared events calendar (McGill login required).

STUDENT REPRESENTATION

The role of the McGill Information Studies Student Association (MISSA) is to co-ordinate the activities of the students of the McGill School of Information Studies and to ensure representation of student interests in the school, in the university, and in the library and information profession. Get involved with MISSA or contact MISSA council members to share ideas for making the student experience at SIS the best it can be.

In addition to other communication and feedback channels available to SIS students, elected members from the student body act as formal representatives for students at SIS Departmental meetings (MLISSA President, MLISSA V-P Internal and PhD Representative) and SIS Curriculum Committee meetings. These members are charged with both representing and informing the student body. Students may at all times bring issues and questions to their student representatives for formal representation to the School.


Welcome from the McGill Information Studies Student Association

 May 2014

Dear Incoming SIS Students,

Congratulations! On behalf of the McGill Information Studies Student Association (MISSA), we are thrilled to welcome you to the School of Information Studies (SIS), McGill University, and the city of Montreal!

MISSA is a student run group with a mandate to coordinate and promote professional development and social activities for students in the School of Information Studies. We are also responsible for representing your interests within the School, at McGill University, and in the community of Information Professionals at large. There are many ways to be involved in MISSA. These include running for an executive position in either our Fall or Springtime elections, taking part in a MISSA committee, and attending MISSA sponsored events.

The McGill Information Studies Student Association is here to help you enhance your experience at SIS by providing you with opportunities to get to know your fellow students, network, and develop your professional skills in the realm of Information Studies. Some past events include the September picnic, end of semester parties, the involvement fair, used textbook sale, career fair, and MISSA blog publications. We are excited to plan these events and more for you and welcome your ideas for further activities. We hope that these events will help enrich both your social and professional experiences at SIS!

In addition to MISSA, we encourage students to become involved in the many professional associations and student groups offered on campus. These groups include L’Association des bibliothécaires du Québec Library Association (ABQLA), the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA), the Canadian Library Association (CLA), the Special Libraries Association (SLA), the McGill Multilingual Children’s Library (MCL), and Librarians Without Borders, among others. These organizations are great for networking, socializing, and learning. Student groups have access to a number of meeting rooms at the SIS mansion (3661 Peel) and a shared student association office.

For more information, check out the SIS student association web pages. We look forward to meeting you in the upcoming school year!

Christina De Longhi
MISSA President 2014-2015
Email

McGill Information Studies Student Association

 


Questions after reading this handbook? Visit our contact guide.