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Lecture with Nobel Prize Winner Sir Paul Nurse - Trial and Error: The politics of science

8Dec201503:00
to
04:00
Faculty Club Ballroom, 3450 rue McTavish, Montreal, QC, H3A 0E5, CA

 

 

Trial and Error: The politics of science

Key mechanism identified in brain tumor growth

A gene known as OSMR plays a key role in driving the growth of glioblastoma tumors, according to a new study led by a McGill University researcher and published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of brain tumor in adults. Unfortunately, there are no effective treatments for the disease. On average, patients succumb just 16 months after diagnosis.

Published: 25Apr2016

Increasing cases of anaphylaxis among children

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). The findings, published this week in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI), reveal that the percentage of emergency department (ED) visits due to anaphylaxis doubled over a four-year period based on data collected from the Montreal Children’s Hospital of the MUHC (MCH-MUHC).

Published: 21Apr2016

Brighter prospects for chronic pain

 

The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre.

Researchers bred mice with a light-sensitive trait in peripheral neurons that were known to be responsible for pain transmission. The mice were genetically modified so that these neurons, called Nav 1.8+ nociceptors, express proteins called opsins, which react to light, a process known as optogenetics.  

Published: 20Apr2016

Isabelle Daunais Wins 2016 Killam Prize in Humanities

By Kathryn Jezer-Morton

 

What does a novel communicate about the world of its inhabitants?? What can it teach us about our relation to the world that other forms of thought do not teach us? Prof. Isabelle Daunais, of McGill’s Département de langue et littérature françaises and Canada Research Chair in the Esthetics and Art of the Novel, engaged with these questions to critical acclaim in her 2015 book, Le roman sans aventure (Les Éditions du Boréal), and they continue to inform her research today.

Published: 18Apr2016

$1.2 M for McGill from CFI John R. Evans Leaders Fund

On April 15, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) announced a new round of research investment that is bringing $1.2 million to McGill. In total, six McGill research projects will be funded, covering subjects ranging from the creation of a mobile ecology lab for the study of Arctic environmental change to studying the underlying processes behind the pain that comes from doing physical exercise.

Published: 15Apr2016

McGill gets $1.65 M from NSERC for training project

McGill Newsroom

CREATE project to prepare graduates for high-skills work in surgical-devices industry

A team led by McGill University professor Jake Barralet will receive $1.65 million from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to provide nearly 90 students with cross-disciplinary training to prepare them for high-skill jobs in the surgical devices industry.

Published: 14Apr2016

How depression may compound risk of type 2 diabetes

McGill Newsroom

Depression, metabolic factors combine to boost risk of developing diabetes, study finds 

Depression may compound the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with early warning signs of metabolic disease, according to researchers from McGill University, l'Université de Montréal, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and the University of Calgary.

Published: 12Apr2016

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