April 14, 2005

April 14, 2005 McGill University

| Skip to search Skip to navigation Skip to page content

User Tools (skip):

Sign in | Sunday, July 13, 2014
Sister Sites: McGill website | myMcGill

McGill Reporter
April 14, 2005 - Volume 37 Number 14
| Help
Page Options (skip): Larger
Now that classes are over and spring is here, people are gathering outside on lower campus to take advantage of the good weather. Undergraduate student Ben Scott from the Faculty of Education launches a Frisbee into the air with the greatest of ease. Let’s hope his exams go so effortlessly, too.
Owen Egan

Now that classes are over and spring is here, people are gathering outside on lower campus to take advantage of the good weather. Undergraduate student Ben Scott from the Faculty of Education launches a Frisbee into the air with the greatest of ease. Let's hope his exams go so effortlessly, too.
Owen Egan



McGill's three Killam winners

McGill scored an unprecedented hat trick in this year's Killam Prizes. Computer scientist Luc Devroye, medical anthropologist Margaret Lock and biochemistry professor Nahum Sonenberg each won a $100,000 prize in their respective fields.

Scholars chew the fat

Canada is growing, and it's not entirely in a good way. Obesity is on the rise, and experts participating in a McGill conference say that diet alone won't solve the problem.

Science and the entrepreneur

McGill graduate Julian Adams returned to McGill to share his experiences as a groundbreaking research chemist leading the field in anti-cancer drug development.

Anti-American obsession: Quebec vs. the U.S.

Seagram Visiting Chair in Canadian Studies David Haglund examines the roots of Quebec's developing, and historically recent, aversion to our southern neighbours.

What's for dinner? Let instinct guide you

The red colobus monkey of Uganda may not have access to Canada's food guide, but anthropology professor Colin Chapman has discovered their nutritional preferences. This may help park managers boost the numbers of the little tree dwellers.

Class, experts discuss UN Congo mission

A number of high-ranking military, judicial and political experts participated in a recent panel discussion in a religious studies class on the UN peacekeeping mission in the Congo.

Using computers to test survival success

André Costopoulos studies ancient hominid species and the factors that affected their different survival rates, and he does it in real time. No, he doesn't own a time machine: the anthropologist uses computer models to imagine how our antecedents might have coped with their world.

Listening to the great beyond

Seth Shostak, senior astronomer with the SETI project, not only believes in extraterrestrial life, he's sure we'll hear from them within the next few decades.

Lighting Nicaragua

While in Nicaragua last year, engineering student Bahareh Seyedi was struck by the lack of activity after the sun set at night. Together with fellow students and some innovative technology, she has set up a program that will bring light to rural areas.

McGill's daycare dilemma

There are hundreds of people on the waiting lists for McGill's two daycares, run by the university and by the SSMU. The provincially subsidized system keeps costs down for parents, but has led to administrative problems that university users are addressing through informal discussion groups and lobbying.

Nursing students go to Rwanda

Nursing students Annemarie Hoffmann and Maria MacDougall will be spending two months with the Kigali Health Institute in Rwanda, helping students and instructors there develop a new curriculum for the many challenges that are facing the tiny central African republic.

Solving the myelin mystery

Neuroscientist David Colman is part of an innovative effort to find treatments for multiple sclerosis, funded and led by an American millionaire who has the disease.



Letter to the editor

Kudos

McGill Matters

In Focus
David Krawitz is the keystone among builders as administrative officer in the School of Architecture. Social worker Lolly Annahatak wins National Aboriginal Achievement Award.



Entre Nous with acting Vice-Principal (Research) Jacques Hurtubise


The VP research on what his office can do for McGill researchers looking for support, service and funding.


Around campus


Dr Lawrence Altman has his ear to the pulse of the United States, both as a doctor and as a reporter for the New York Times, Dr Martin Dawes has some advice on how to become a better patient, the McGill Middle East Program in Civil Society and Peace Building screens the documentary An Unlikely Friendship, and the Law Faculty goes po-mo, semiotically.

view sidebar content | back to top of page

Search