Quick Links

Jacob T. Levy

Tomlinson Professor of Political Theory
Professor of Political Science
Associate member, Department of Philosophy


Ph.D., Princeton University
LL.M., University of Chicago law School

Coordinator of the Research Group on Constitutional Studies and of the Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Philosophie Politique.

Director of the Yan P. Lin Centre For the Study of Freedom and Global Orders in the Ancient and Modern Worlds


Home page
CV

scholar.google profile

jtlevy [at] gmail [dot] com

Research interests

In contemporary normative political theory: multiculturalism, nationalism, liberalism, pluralism, theories of justice, non-ideal theory

In the history of political thought: medieval and early modern thought, especially the French, Scottish, and American Enlightenments and the history of constitutionalist and liberal thought

In legal and constitutional theory: rights of indigenous peoples, federalism, choice of law and conflicts of laws, freedom of association, religious freedom, contract, analytic jurisprudence, legal pluralism

 

Selected publications:

Books:

The Multiculturalism of Fear (Oxford University Press, 2000; in Spanish, El multiculturalismo del miedo, Madrid: Tecnos/ Collección de ciencias sociales, 2003)

Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom. (Oxford University Press, 2014)

Selected articles:

“Not so Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts,” 37(2) Political Theory 191-217, 2009

“Three Perversities of Indian Law,” 12(2) Texas Review of Law and Politics 329-68, 2008

“Self-determination, non-domination, and federalism,” 23(3) Hypatia, 60-78, 2008

"Federalism, Liberalism, and the Separation of Loyalties," 101(3) American Political Science Review 459-77, 2007

"Federalism and the Old and New Liberalisms," 24(1) Social Philosophy and Policy 306-26, 2007

"Beyond Publius: Montesquieu, Liberal Republicanism, and the Small-Republic Thesis." 27(1) History of Political Thought, 50-90, 2006

"Liberalism's Divide After Socialism-- and Before," 20(1) Social Philosophy and Policy 278-297 (2003)