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  • Protein supplements: powerful powder or powerful promotion?

    Google the words ‘protein supplements for athletes’ and a number of links will appear in your browser.

    Read More.
  • Marketing appears to trump science on antibacterials

    Store shelves these days sag under the weight of antibacterial soaps, cosmetics, socks, toys and even garbage bags.

    Read More.
  • Dr. Sen’s Perfect Vision System

    ’m accustomed to being forwarded all sorts of videos about miraculous cures that are being suppressed by the establishment.

    Read More.
  • In the beginning there was…Persil

    The world’s first commercially available laundry powder was Persil, introduced by the German company Henkel in 1907. The name derived from perborate and silicate, two key components in the product.

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  • An Apple a Day!

    An apple a day may keep the doctor away and is a good idea title for a book, but it’s probably a bad premise for a scientific study.

    Read More.
  • Apples and Sex

    Did Eve eat an apple to have a better sex life with Adam? One might come to that conclusion after reading a paper published in the Archives of Gynaecology and Obstetrics with the alluring title “Apple consumption is related to better sexual quality of life

    Read More.

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Latest OSS Blog Articles: 

Sizing up the most fashionable address in New York City
The most fashionable address in New York is no longer Central Park West. It is 66 East 11th St., in Greenwich Village. The building doesn’t look like much from the outside; it was once a factory, then a parking garage. Now totally remodelled on the inside, it has been dubbed as “wellness real estate,” with a focus on the environment and the health of its residents. Read More.

Apples and Sex
Did Eve eat an apple to have a better sex life with Adam? One might come to that conclusion after reading a paper published in the Archives of Gynaecology and Obstetrics with the alluring title “Apple consumption is related to better sexual quality of life in young women.”  Read More.

Protein supplements: powerful powder or powerful promotion?
Google the words ‘protein supplements for athletes’ and a number of links will appear in your browser. While apparently just a click away from learning the ‘truth’ about these dietary additions, it is advisable to consider the nature of whichever website you fall upon before hollering hallelujah. Read More.

In the beginning there was...Persil

The world’s first commercially available laundry powder was Persil, introduced by the German company Henkel in 1907. The name derived from perborate and silicate, two key components in the product. Persil was introduced as an improvement over the action of soap, the traditional cleaning agent first formulated around 1500 BC. Read More.

Marketing appears to trump science on antibacterials

Store shelves these days sag under the weight of antibacterial soaps, cosmetics, socks, toys and even garbage bags. There’s no question that “antibacterial” on a label increases sales, but there are plenty of questions about the wisdom of impregnating everything in sight with compounds that kill bacteria indiscriminately. Read More.




Did You Know?

Danbury, Connecticut used to be the center of the American hat industry.  It was also known for the “Danbury shakes,” a condition that encompassed tremors, incoherent speech, difficulty in walking and eventual feeble mindedness.  Victims of this disease were the hatters who used mercury compounds in the processing of felt!  This condition was also known in Europe as evidenced by Lewis Carrol’s “Mad Hatter” character in the famous Alice stories.  Great care needs to be exercised in the handling of mercury.  Even a broken thermometer can cause serious problems.  The metal should be cleaned up with an eyedropper and placed in a sealed container.  Never use a vacuum cleaner!  It spreads the mercury vapor.

For more interesting facts, please make sure to check out our "Did You Know?" section.


Most Recent Science Links:

Fist bumps spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says
Ditching handshakes in favour of more informal fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a study released on Monday. Read More.



What Makes a Superfood?
Salmon has at times been touted as a cancer preventive. Many nutritionists praise the health benefits of blueberries, kale and cinnamon bark. How does a food get elevated from the grocery aisle to superfood status? One expert, Phil Hagen, a preventive-medicine specialist at the Mayo Clinic's Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn., explains why there is more to food than a name. Read More.

Dr. Frank Arguello’s “atavistic oncology”: Another dubious cancer therapy to be avoided
Not infrequently, I’m asked why it is that I do what I do. Why do I spend so many hours of my free time, both here and at my not-so-super-secret other blog (NSSSOB), to write my detailed analyses of various forms of quackery, analyses of scientific studies, and expressions of my dismay at the infiltration of pseudoscience into medicine, particularly medical academia in a phenomenon I like to call “quackademic medicine”? Read More.

Video: Astrophysicist Victoria Kaspi on Fast Radio Bursts
Astrophysicist and McGill professor Victoria Kaspi Speaks on the discovery of Fast Radio Bust at her McGill office on on Monday July 14, 2014. Her team as replicated the findings of an Australian research team on these new beams of radio waves from the outskirts of the universe. Read More.




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