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First Year Arts Students

At McGill, all students enter to a 120-credit degree. In some cases, they have written university level examinations, so they have been granted advanced standing in their first year. If you are a CEGEP student, you are exempted from the Freshman program as you have been granted 30 advanced standing credits from your DEC. You automatically register as a U1 student, and declare your major and minor while registering on Minerva. The same information applies to you if you did the French Baccalaureate. If you are a student who did the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Certificate (IB) or any Advanced Level (AL), Advanced Placement (AP) courses, depending on your examination results, you may also be qualified as U1. Do not panic if none of these categories represent your situation! If you did not complete any of the programs above before coming to McGill, then you will be entering as a Freshman student (U0). For more information about the different types of Advanced Standing, please visit the new student FAQ or the Arts OASIS Guide for New StudentsFor more information on transfer credits, please visit McGill's guide to transfer credits.
 

Based on the new advanced standing policy as outlined in the e-Calendar, you may complete up to 120 credits for your B.A. degree.

Freshman U0

BA Freshman Program

The Bachelor of Arts Freshman Program is designed to ensure that you gain a broad foundation for the three-year degree program. It is comprised of 24-30 credits in one of two program options. Courses taken to fulfill the core requirements in either options must be passed with a grade of “C” or better. They cannot include courses taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option. If you have received advanced credits such as AP’s, IB’s, AL’s, or university transfer credits, you may, be exempt from part or all of the B.A. Freshman Program requirements.

In Option 1, "General Option", you are able to develop your own program of study using courses from the Humanities, Social Sciences, Languages, and/or Math and Sciences. Students choosing this option are eligible to register in First-Year Seminars, small-enrollment classes offered by several departments, exclusively for Freshman students. Please click the "First Year Seminars" link below for a complete listing.

In Option 2, "En français", you are able to choose up to 18 credits from a variety of courses conducted in french.

In both Options 1 and 2, courses taken should ordinarily be at the introductory level with course numbers in the 100 and 200 ranges. In addition, the majority of your courses must be chosen from those offered by the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science. Note that any course listed under another Faculty’s offerings is considered to be a Faculty of Arts course if it is listed in the Faculty of Arts section of the Course Calendar.

Option 1
"General Option"

This option includes a core requirement of 6 credits in each of 3 of the 4 categories: Social Sciences, Humanities, Languages, and Mathematics & Science. A maximum of 18 credits may be chosen from any one category but no more than 12 credits may be taken in one department.

I. Social Science

Anthropology
Economics
Geography
History
Linguistics

Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Social Studies of Medicine
Social Work
Women's Studies


II. Humanities

Art History & Communications Studies
English
Music

Philosophy
Religious Studies
Women's Studies

LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION courses ONLY from the following departments and programs:

Classics
East Asian Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Italian Studies
Jewish Studies
Russian Studies


III. Languages

In this category, you may take courses to acquire or to improve your language skills. Literature and civilization courses offered by these departments count as Humanities, not Language courses. A placement test may be necessary and approval from the appropriate department may be required.

Classics (Latin, Ancient Greek or Modern Greek)
East Asian Studies (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)
English or French as a Second Language
French Language & Literature
German Studies
Hispanic Studies (Portuguese, Spanish)

Islamic Studies (Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu)
Italian
Jewish Studies (Hebrew, Yiddish)
Religious Studies (New Testament Greek, Sanskrit)
Russian & Slavic Studies
(Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Armenian, Czech)


IV. Mathematics and Science

Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Earth & Planetary Sciences

Geography
Math & Statistics
Physiology
Psychiatry
Psychological Statistics
Physics

Option 2
"En Français"

This option includes a core requirement of 18 credits of courses conducted in French. These credits may be comprised wholly of language courses, wholly of substantive content courses conducted in French, or a combination of the two. You may be required to take a proficiency test.

Depending on your level of proficiency, you may include a maximum of 12 credits of intensive French language courses. An intensive language course is a 6 credit term course. If you are at the introductory level, you must take at least 6 credits in French in your Freshman year, but you may be permitted to complete the remaining core requirement credits in year U1.

The remainder of your credits must be comprised of courses approved for the B.A. Freshman Program.

French Language and Literature

FREN 199
FREN 201
FREN 203
FREN 231
FREN 239
FREN 245

French as a Second Language

FRSL 101
FRSL 105
FRSL 206
FRSL 207
FRSL 208
FRSL 211
FRSL 212
FRSL 215
FRSL 216
FRSL 302
FRSL 303
FRSL 321
FRSL 322
FRSL 325
FRSL 326
FRSL 332
FRSL 333
FRSL 407
FRSL 408
FRSL 431
FRSL 432
FRSL 445
FRSL 446
FRSL 449
 

 

Political Science

POLI 226

Approved Freshman Courses

As a freshman B.A. student, you must select your Arts and Science courses from those listed below.

Note: The most up-to-date information about whether a course is being offered is in Class Schedule on Minerva. Courses not being offered are not listed in Class Schedule. You should also consult Class Schedule on Minerva for changes in course offerings or times and for the locations of the courses. Reminder: all courses have limited enrollment.

Humanities                  Languages                 Social Sciences                Mathematics & Science

I. HUMANITIES

Note: Some of the courses listed below are not suitable for first term as they require university level prerequisites. Please check the Calendar course entries for further information about appropriate background before registering.

African Studies

AFRI 200 Intro to African Studies
(also listed under Social Sciences)

Art History

ARTH 199 FYS: Themes in Art History
ARTH 200 Introduction to Art History 1
ARTH 202 Intro to Contemporary Art
ARTH 204 Intro to Medieval Art & Arch
ARTH 205 Introduction to Modern Art
ARTH 207 Intro Early Mod. Art 1400-1700
ARTH 209 Intro to Ancient Art and Arch
ARTH 215 Introduction to East Asian Art
ARTH 223 Intro Italian Renais. Art 1300-1500
ARTH 226 Intro to 18th C. Art & Arch

Canadian Studies

CANS 200 Introduction to the Study of Canada
(also listed under Social Sciences)

Catholic Studies

CATH 200 Introduction to Catholicism
CATH 325 Mystery and the Imagination
CATH 370 Topics in Catholic Studies

Classics

CLAS 200 Intro to Ancient Greek Lit
CLAS 203 Greek Mythology
CLAS 206 Classics in Modern Media
CLAS 208 Introduction to Roman Lit.
CLAS 240 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
HIST 205 Ancient Mediterranean History

Communication Studies

COMS 199 FYS: Themes in Comm. Studies
COMS 200 History of Communication
COMS 210 Intro to Communication Studies
COMS 230 Communication and Democracy

East Asian Studies

EAST 211 Intro: East Asian Culture: China 
EAST 212 Intro: East Asian Culture: Japan
EAST 213 Intro: East Asian Culture: Korea 
EAST 303 Current Topics: Chinese Studies 1
EAST 305 Current Topics: Japanese Studies 1

English

ENGL 199 FYS: Literature and Democracy
ENGL 200 Survey of English Literature 1
ENGL 201 Survey of English Lit 2
ENGL 215 Intro to Shakespeare
ENGL 225 American Literature 1
ENGL 226 American Literature 2
ENGL 227 American Literature 3
ENGL 228 Canadian Literature 1
ENGL 229 Canadian Literature 2
ENGL 230 Intro to Theatre Studies
ENGL 237 Intro to Study of a Lit Form
ENGL 279 Introduction to Film as Art
ENGL 280 Intro to Film as Mass Medium
ENGL 297 Special Topics of Lit. Study

French Language & Literature

FREN 198 FYS: Intro to French & Québec Lit
FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 250 Littérature française avant 1800
FREN 251 Littérature française depuis 1800
FREN 252 Littérature québécoise

Gender Sexuality Feminist and Social Justice Studies

GSFS 200 Intro Feminist&Social Justice
GSFS 250 Intro: Sexual Diversity St

German Studies

GERM 259 Intro to German Literature 1
GERM 367 Topics In German Thought

Hispanic Studies

HISP 225 Hispanic Civilization 1
HISP 226 Hispanic Civilization 2
HISP 301 Hispanic Lit. & Culture in English 1

Indigenous Studies

INDG 200 Intro. to Indigenous Studies

Islamic Studies

ISLA 199 FYS: Narrations of the Middle East
ISLA 200 Islamic Civilization
(also listed under Social Sciences)
ISLA 210 Muslim Societies
(also listed as a Social Sciences course)

Italian Studies

ITAL 199 Italy's Literature in Context
ITAL 230 Understanding Italy
ITAL 250 Italian Literary Composition
ITAL 260 Reading Italian Literature
ITAL 290 Commedia Dell'Arte
ITAL 310 The Invention of Italian Lit
ITAL 360 Contemporary Italian Prose
ITAL 375 Cinema & Society in Modern Italy

Jewish Studies

JWST 199 FYS: Images-Jewish Identities
JWST 201 Jewish Law
JWST 206 Intro to Yiddish Literature
JWST 211 Jewish St 1: Biblical Period
JWST 217 Jewish St 3: 1000 to 2000
JWST 225 Literature and Society
JWST 240 The Holocaust
JWST 252 Interdisciplinary Lectures
JWST 254 The Jewish Holy Days
JWST 261 History of Jewish Philosophy & Thought

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

LLCU 199 Literary Animals
LLCU 201 Literature and Culture Topics
LLCU 212 Understanding Digital &Social Media
LLCU 230 Environmental Imaginations
LLCU 255 Intro to Literary Text Mining

Music

MUAR 201 Basic Materials: Western Music
MUAR 211 The Art of Listening
MUAR 384 Romanticism & the Piano
MUAR 392 Popular Music after 1945
MUAR 393 Intro to Jazz

Philosophy

PHIL 200 Intro to Philosophy 1
PHIL 201 Intro to Philosophy 2
PHIL 210 Intro to Deductive Logic 1
PHIL 221 Intro to History & Phil of Science 2
PHIL 230 Intro to Moral Philosophy 1
PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues
PHIL 240 Political Philosophy 1
PHIL 242 Intro to Feminist Theory

Religious Studies

RELG 201 Religions: Ancient Near East
RELG 202 Religion of Ancient Israel
RELG 203 Bible and Western Culture
RELG 204 Judaism, Christianity & Islam
RELG 207 The Study of World Religions 1
RELG 210 Jesus of Nazareth
RELG 252 Hinduism & Buddhism
RELG 253 Religions of East Asia
RELG 256 Women in Judaism and Islam
RELG 270 Religious Ethics & the Environment
RELG 271 Sexual Ethics

Russian & Slavic Studies

RUSS 217 Russia's Eternal Questions
RUSS 223 Russian 19c: Literary Giants 1
RUSS 224 Russian 19c. Literary Giants 2
RUSS 337 Vladimir Nabokov
RUSS 382 Russian Opera

II. Languages

NOTE:

Placement tests: All language courses have limited enrollment and, as such, may require a departmental approval (issued by the department offering the course). Consult the McGill Calendar and/or the class schedule for information about placement tests or departmental approval (if necessary). Please note that placement tests for French and English Second Language courses and for English for Academic Purposes will be held during the week prior to the beginning of classes in September. Placement Tests/FrenchEnglish as a Second Language

Courses with numbers ending in D1 and D2 are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly fall and winter). Students must register for the same section of both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms, e.g., fall 2016 and winter 2017.

No more than one 6-credit or 9-credit language at an introductory level should be taken during the Freshman year. Students with prior knowledge of the language may take higher-level courses with permission from the department.

A 6-credit intensive language course given in one term is permitted - this is equivalent to two courses both in the number of credits as well as the workload.

Classics

CLAS 210 Introductory Latin 1
CLAS 212 Introductory Latin 2
CLAS 220 Introductory Ancient Greek 1
CLAS 222 Introductory Ancient Greek 2 
CLAS 230D1 Introductory Modern Greek
and 
CLAS 230D2 Introductory Modern Greek

East Asian Studies

EAST 220D1 First Level Korean
and
EAST 220D2 First Level Korean

EAST 230D1 First Level Chinese
and
EAST 230D2 First Level Chinese

EAST 240D1 First Level Japanese
and
EAST 240D2 First Level Japanese

EAST 320D1 Second Level Korean
and
EAST 320D2 Second Level Korean

EAST 330D1 Second Level Chinese
and
EAST 330D2 Second Level Chinese

EAST 340D1 Second Level Japanese
and
EAST 340D2 Second Level Japanese

English (and English as a Second Language)

CEAP 250 Research Essay & Rhetoric
CESL 300 ESL: Academic English 2
CESL 400 ESL: Essay & Critical Thinking
CESL 500 ESL: Research Essay & Rhetoric

French Language & Literature

FREN 198 FYS: Intro. to French & Québec Lit.
FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 201 Composition 1
FREN 203 Composition 2
FREN 231 Linguistique française
FREN 239 Stylistique comparée
FREN 245 Grammaire avancée
FREN 252 Littérature québécoise

French as a Second Language

FRSL 101 Beginners French 1
FRSL 102 Beginners French 2
FRSL 103 Near Beginners French
FRSL 104 Corrective French Pronunciation
FRSL 105 Intensive Beginners French
FRSL 206 Elementary French

FRSL 207D1 Elementary French 01
and
FRSL 207D2 Elementary French 01

FRSL 208 Intensive Elementary French

FRSL 211D1 Oral and Written French 1
and
FRSL 211D2 Oral and Written French 1

FRSL 212 Oral & Written French 1
FRSL 215 Oral & Written French 1-Intensive
FRSL 216 Découvrons Montréal en français
FRSL 302 Listening Comp & Oral Exp 1
FRSL 303 Listening Comp & Oral Exp 2
FRSL 321 Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 322 Oral & Written French 2
FRSL 325 Oral & Written French 2-Intensive
FRSL 332 Intermediate French: Grammar 01
FRSL 333 Intermediate French: Grammar 02
FRSL 407 Compréhension et Expression orales
FRSL 408 Français oral: Textes et Expressions
FRSL 431 Français fonctionnel avancé
FRSL 432 Français fonctionnel
FRSL 445 Français fonctionnel, écrit 1
FRSL 446 Français fonctionnel, écrit 2
FRSL 449 Le français des médias
FRSL 455 Grammaire et création

German Studies

GERM 200 German Language Intensive Beginners

GERM 202D1 German Language, Beginners
and
GERM 202D2 German Language, Beginners

GERM 300 German Lang Intensive Intermediate

GERM 307D1 German Language - Intermediate
and
GERM 307D2 German Language - Intermediate

Hispanic Studies

HISP 199 FYS: Hispanic Literature & Culture

HISP 210D1 Spanish Language: Beginners
and
HISP 210D2 Spanish Language: Beginners

HISP 218 Spanish Lang Intensive-Elementary

HISP 219 Spanish Lang Intensive-Intermediate

HISP 220D1 Spanish Language: Intermediate
and
HISP 220D2 Spanish Language: Intermediate

HISP 244 Survey of Spanish-American Lit. 2

Islamic Studies

ISLA 521D1 Introductory Arabic
and
ISLA 521D2 Introductory Arabic

ISLA 522D1 Lower Intermediate Arabic
and
ISLA 522D2 Lower Intermediate Arabic

ISLA 532D1 Introductory Turkish
and
ISLA 532D2 Introductory Turkish

ISLA 533D1 Lower Intermediate Turkish
and
ISLA 533D2 Lower Intermediate Turkish

ISLA 541D1 Introductory Persian
and
ISLA 541D2 Introductory Persian

ISLA 542D1 Lower Intermediate Persian
and
ISLA 542D2 Lower Intermediate Persian

ISLA 551D1 Introductory Urdu-Hindi
and
ISLA 551D2 Introductory Urdu-Hindi

ISLA 552D1 Intermediate Urdu
and
ISLA 552D2 Intermediate Urdu

Italian Studies

ITAL 205D1 Italian for Beginners
and
ITAL 205D2 Italian for Beginners

ITAL 206 Beginners Italian Intensive

ITAL 210D1 Elementary Italian
and
ITAL 210D2 Elementary Italian

ITAL 215D1 Intermediate Italian
and
ITAL 215D2 Intermediate Italian

ITAL 216 Intermediate Italian Intensive

Jewish Studies

JWST 220D1 Introductory Hebrew
and
JWST 220D2 Introductory Hebrew

JWST 281D1 Introductory Yiddish 1 
and
JWST 282D2 Introductory Yiddish 2 

JWST 320D1 Intermediate Hebrew
and
JWST 320D2 Intermediate Hebrew

JWST 340D1 Advanced Hebrew
and
JWST 340D2 Advanced Hebrew

JWST 367 Hebrew Language & Israeli Culture 1
JWST 368 Hebrew Language & Israeli Culture 2
JWST 369 Hebrew Language & Israeli Culture 3
JWST 370 Hebrew Language & Israeli Culture 4

Religious Studies

RELG 257D1 Introductory Sanskrit
and
RELG 257D2 Introductory Sanskrit

RELG 264 Introductory Tibetan 1
RELG 265 Introductory Tibetan 2

RELG 280D1 Elementary New Testament Greek
and
RELG 280D2 Elementary New Testament Greek

Russian & Slavic Studies

RUSS 210 Elementary Russian Language 1
RUSS 211 Elementary Russian Language 2
RUSS 215 Elementary Russian Language Inten. 1
RUSS 310 Intermediate Russian Language 1
RUSS 311 Intermediate Russian Language 2
RUSS 316 Intermediate Russian Language Inten. 2

III. SOCIAL SCIENCES

Note: If you intend to follow a psychology program, you should not register in SOCI-216 (Social Psychology). PSYC-215 (Social Psychology) is more appropriate. Credit will not be given for both courses.

African Studies

AFRI 200 Intro to African Studies

Anthropology

ANTH 201 Prehistoric Archaeology  
ANTH 202 Socio-Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 203 Human Evolution
ANTH 204 Anthropology of Meaning
ANTH 206 Environment and Culture
ANTH 207 Ethnography Through Film
ANTH 208 Evolutionary Anthropology
ANTH 209 Anthropology of Religion
ANTH 210 Archaeology of Early Cities
ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development
ANTH 214 Violence, Warfare, Culture
ANTH 222 Legal Anthropology
ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology

Canadian Studies

CANS 200 Introduction to the Study of Canada
(also listed as a Humanities course)

Economics

ECON 199 FYS: Aspects of Globalization
ECON 205 An Intro to Political Economy
ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis & App.
ECON 209 Macroeconomic Analysis & App.
ECON 219 Current Econ Problems: Topics
ECON 223 Political Economy of Trade Policy  
ECON 225 Economics of the Environment

Gender Sexuality Feminist and Social Justice Studies

GSFS 200 Intro Feminist&Social Justice
GSFS 250 Intro: Sexual Diversity St

Geography

GEOG 200 Geo. Perspectives: World Envr. Prob. 
GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples  
GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy
GEOG 217 Cities in the Modern World
GEOG 221 Environment and Health

History

HIST 194 FYS: Jewish Concepts of Others
HIST 195 FYS: Sources of World History
HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America
HIST 198 FYS: Nation Building & Nationalism
HIST 200 Intro to African History
HIST 201 Modern African History
HIST 202 Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203 Survey: Canada since 1867
HIST 205 Ancient Mediterranean History
HIST 206 Africa & the Indian Ocean World
HIST 207 Jewish History:400 BCE to 1000
HIST 208 Intro to East Asian History
HIST 211 American History to 1865 
HIST 213 World History, 1300-2000
HIST 214 Intro to European History
HIST 215 Modern European History
HIST 216 History of Russia to 1801  
HIST 218 Modern East Asian History
HIST 219 Jewish History: 1000-2000
HIST 221 United States since 1865
HIST 223 Natives of the Americas 
HIST 226 East Central&South Eastern Europe in 20th C
HIST 236 Russia from 1801 to 1991
HIST 240 Modern History of Islamic Movement
HIST 249 Health & the Healer in West History
HIST 292 History and the Environment

Islamic Studies

ISLA 200 Islamic Civilization
(also listed under Humanities)
ISLA 210 Muslim Societies
(also listed under Humanities)

Linguistics

LING 199 FYS: Language and Mind
LING 200 Intro to the Study of Language
LING 201 Introduction to Linguistics

Political Science

POLI 199 FYS: Inside Political Campaigns  
POLI 200 Introduction to Political Science  
POLI 210 Political Science Research Methods
POLI 212 Gov't & Politics-Developed World
POLI 221 Government of Canada
POLI 222 Political Process & Behaviour in Canada
POLI 226 La vie politique Québécoise
POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction
POLI 231 Intro to Political Theory
POLI 232 Modern Political Thought
POLI 243 Intl Politics of Econ Relations  
POLI 244 Intl Politics: State Behaviour

Psychology

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 180 Critical Thinking: Biases and Illusions  
PSYC 199 FYS: Mind-Body Medicine  
PSYC 204 Intro to Psychological Statistics
PSYC 211 Intro Behavioural Neuroscience  
PSYC 212 Perception
PSYC 213 Cognition
PSYC 215 Social Psychology  

Sociology

SOCI 210 Sociological Perspectives  
SOCI 211 Sociological Inquiry  
SOCI 219 Sociology of Culture  
SOCI 222 Urban Sociology  
SOCI 225 Medicine & Health in Mod Society
SOCI 230 Sociology of Ethnic Relations
SOCI 234 Population & Society
SOCI 235 Technology and Society
SOCI 247 Family & Modern Society
SOCI 250 Social Problems
SOCI 254 Development & Underdevelopment
SOCI 270 Sociology of Gender  

IV. MATHEMATICS & SCIENCE

Note: Some of the courses listed below are not suitable for first term as they require university level prerequisites. Please check the Calendar course entries for further information about appropriate background before registering. Some Science Courses require students to also register for a mandatory lab component. For courses with a lab component, Students must register and pass both the Lecture and Lab components in order to obtain credits.

Atmospheric & Oceanic Science

ATOC 181 Intro to Atmospheric Science
ATOC 182 Intro to Oceanic Sciences
ATOC 183 Climate and Climate Change
ATOC 184 Science of Storms
ATOC 185 Natural Disasters

Biology

 

BIOL 111 Principles: Organismal Biology
BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
BIOL 115 Essential Biology
BIOL 200 Molecular Biology
BIOL 201 Cell Biology & Metabolism
BIOL 202 Basic Genetics
BIOL 205 Biology of Organisms
BIOL 206 Meth in Biology of Organisms

Chemistry

CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chem. Giants
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
CHEM 180 World of Chemistry: Environment
CHEM 181 World of Chemistry: Food
CHEM 182 World of Chemistry: Technology
CHEM 183 World of Chemistry: Drugs
CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry?
CHEM 203 Survey of Physical Chemistry
CHEM 204 Physical Chem. /Biological Sci. 1
CHEM 212 Intro Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 214 Physical Chem. /Biological Sci. 2
CHEM 217 General Analytical Chemistry Lab 1
CHEM 219 Intro to Atmospheric Chemistry
CHEM 222 Intro Organic Chemistry 2
CHEM 223 Intro Phys Chemistry 1
CHEM 243 Intro Phys Chemistry 2
CHEM 253 Intro Phys Chemistry 1 Lab
CHEM 263 Intro Phys Chemistry 2 Lab
CHEM 281 Inorganic Chemistry 1
CHEM 287 Intro Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 297 Intro Analytical Chem. Lab.

Computer Science

COMP 102 Computers & Computing
COMP 189 Computers and Society
COMP 202 Foundations of Programming
COMP 206 Intro to Software Systems
COMP 230 Logic and Computability
COMP 250 Intro to Computer Science
COMP 280 History and Philosophy of Computing

Earth & Planetary Sciences

EPSC 180 The Terrestrial Planets
EPSC 181 Environmental Geology
EPSC 182 Astrobiology
EPSC 185 Natural Disasters
EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Exploration
EPSC 201 Understanding Planet Earth
EPSC 233 Earth and Life History
EPSC 334 Invertebrate Paleontology
ESYS 104 The Earth System

Geography

GEOG 201 Intro Geo-Information Science
GEOG 205 Global Change: Past, Present & Future
GEOG 221 Environment and Health

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 112 Fundamentals of Mathematics
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
MATH 134 Enriched Linear Algebra and Geometry
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Pre-calculus
MATH 140 Calculus 1
MATH 141 Calculus 2
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 151 Calculus B
MATH 180 The Art of Mathematics
MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1
MATH 204 Principles of Statistics 2
MATH 222 Calculus 3
MATH 223 Linear Algebra

Physics

PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics
PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
PHYS 180 Space, Time & Matter
PHYS 181 Everyday Physics
PHYS 182 Our Evolving Universe
PHYS 183 The Milky Way Inside and Out
PHYS 184 Energy and the Environment
PHYS 224 Physics of Music

Psychology

PSYC 199 FYS: Mind-Body Medicine
PSYC 204 Intro to Psychological Stats

Psychiatry

PSYT 199 FYS: Mental Illness & The Brain

Important dates for advising, registration, and orientation

For a list of important upcoming dates for 2016-2017, please see here

Don't forget to attend the Arts Departmental Program Fair on Wednesday, August 31st from 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm!

 

Course Selection

As a Freshman Program student (U0 year) you will be using the Freshman Course Approval Form between June 15 and August 31 to have your course selection approved by a Faculty adviser in Arts OASIS. You will not have a departmental academic adviser until your second year (U1 year). You are, however, encouraged to contact departmental academic advisers if you have specific questions about prerequisites or about the requirements of the program(s) you are considering.

Reminder: You cannot use the S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) option for any course in the B.A. Freshman Program. You also cannot use the S/U option for courses which are required for admission to professional programs such as medical school or for courses which you intend to use toward your programs next year at the departmental level.

If this is the first time you are studying in English, we strongly recommend that you take only 4 courses (12 credits) during your first term and that, as one of these, you consider taking an English as a Second Language course. If you discover that 4 courses are quite manageable, you may wish to take 5 courses during the second term.

If you would like to improve your writing skills, you should consider taking Effective Communication EDEC 202, listed in the Faculty of Education section of the Calendar, or the Fundamentals of Academic Writing EAPR 250, listed under English for Academic Purposes in the Faculty of Arts section of the eCalendar. You may take a maximum of 6 credits of these courses and Effective Communication may not be taken for credit after the Academic Writing courses.

As the B.A. Freshman Program is intended to provide you with a broad foundation for a three-year degree program, you should take this opportunity and select courses in a variety of disciplines, keeping in mind the guidelines outlined for the program. Don't limit yourself to only one or two disciplines; explore and keep your options open. You may be surprised to find out that you have other interests. You may even discover an area of study you had never considered before, or you may learn that you are not as keen on a particular area as you had previously thought.

Courses which are chosen as part of your B.A. Freshman Program may also count towards your intended departmental programs. For example, it may be possible to count a Political Science course taken this year towards the Major Concentration, Minor Concentration or Honours program in Political Science.

Note: Advanced standing credits may exempt you from part or all of the freshman program requirements. For example, if you passed the Art History AP (6 credits) with a grade of 4 or higher, you will have fulfilled the Humanities category of the B.A. freshman program. For further information about advanced standing credits, please read Advanced Standing Credits.

Five points to keep in mind when selecting courses for
Option 1:

  1. a minimum of 3 of the 4 categories must be completed,
  2. to fulfill a category, a minimum of 6 credits must be completed in that category,
  3. a maximum of 18 credits in any one category, and 12 credits per department is permitted,
  4. courses must be selected from the list of approved courses (see "Approved Courses" link above) for the B.A. Freshman Program,
  5. you must not register for courses which are scheduled to meet at the same time.

Four points to keep in mind when selecting courses for
Option 2:

  1. contact the French Language and Literature department or French as a Second Language department for placement tests, and departmental approval when you arrive in Montreal,
  2. a minimum of 18 credits conducted in French is required for this option,
  3. remaining elective courses must be selected from the list of Approved courses for the B.A. Freshman Program,
  4. you must not register for courses which are scheduled to meet at the same time.

Examples of Course Selections

EXAMPLES FOR OPTION 1

Example 1: You're a student admitted into the B.A. Freshman Program with no advanced standing credits

In this instance, you are admitted into a 120-credit degree program, and are not permitted to exceed the maximum of 18 credits in any one category and 12 credits per department.

Using the B.A. Freshman Program Approved Courses list (select Freshman U0 > Approved Courses) and the Freshman Course Approval Form to have your course selection approved, decide on how you intend to fulfill the B.A. Freshman Program requirements.

The normal course load per term is 5 courses for a total of 10 courses per academic year. Therefore, you have 10 courses to divide among the 4 categories - Social Sciences, Humanities, Languages, and Math Science. In order to fulfill the B.A. Freshman Program core requirements and still adhere to the limitations set out above, some examples of the course distribution can be as follows:

Social Sciences
Humanities
Languages
Math and Science
 
18 credits
6 credits
6 credits
0 credits
or
12 credits
3 credits
6 credits
9 credits
or
9 credits
6 credits
12 credits
3 credits
or
3 credits
6 credits
9 credits
14 credits
 

In all these examples, you are fulfilling at least 6 credits in 3 out of 4 categories without exceeding the maximum of 18 credits in any one category keeping in mind that the maximum number of credits per department is 12.

Example 2: You're a student admitted into the B.A. Freshman Program with advanced standing (on the basis of Advanced Placements) in French Language and in Microeconomics

In this instance, you are admitted into a 111-credit degree program with 9 advance standing credits and could fulfill the B.A. Freshman Program core requirements for Option 1 as follows:

Advanced Standing Credits:

 
Social Sciences
Humanities
Languages
Math & Science
3 credits microeconomics
0 credits
6 credits French (exemption
for FRSL 211D)
0 credits

McGill Credits:

 
Social Sciences
Humanities
Languages
Math & Science
3 credits
12 credits
6 credits
0 credits
Total:
6 credits
12 credits
12 credits
30 credits

The minimum of 6 credits in one of the categories has been fulfilled (6 credits in languages). In addition, you have been granted 3 advanced standing credits in a second category, the social sciences, and you need to complete only another 3 credits in the social sciences to fulfill the minimum of 6 credits in a second category. You must also complete 6 credits in a third category.

To try and clarify the matter, let us suppose that to fulfill the core B.A. Freshman Program requirements, Option 1, you first register for 3 credits in the social sciences, 12 credits in the humanities and 6 credits in languages. At this point you will have registered for 21 credits and will have fulfilled the minimum of at least 6 credits in 3 out of 4 categories.

If you wish to register for 30 credits in your freshman year, you still have another 9 credits to select. You may select these credits from any category, including humanities or languages

In essence, keep in mind the following when selecting your courses for Option 1:

advanced standing credits + McGill credits = minimum of 6 credits to a maximum of 18 credits in each of 3 out of 4 categories

advanced standing credits + McGill credits = 24-30 credits for the freshman year

Translation: Once you have successfully completed 24 credits, including advanced standing credits, you may proceed to your U1 year.

EXAMPLES FOR OPTION 2

Example 3: You're a student admitted into the B.A. Freshman Program with no advanced standing.

In this instance, you are admitted into a 120 - credit degree program and required to complete 18 credits of core courses conducted in French. Depending on your degree of language proficiency, this may include a maximum of 12 credits of Intensive French Language. A Placement test is required before admission to any French language course including Beginner's French. Once you have chosen courses to fulfill the core requirement, the remainder of the courses can be selected from the Approved courses for the B.A. Freshman Program list, under the "Approved Courses" header above.

Example 4: You're a student admitted into the B.A. Freshman Program with advanced standing (on the basis of Advanced Placements) in French Language and in U.S. History.

In this instance, you are admitted into a 108 credit degree program and would be required to complete the B.A. Freshman core requirements for Option 2.

Keeping in mind, that the normal course load for the academic year is 10 courses, use the "B.A. Freshman Program Approval Courses" list to select your remaining elective courses.

Advanced Standing Credits:

French Language
Electives
6 credits
(exemption for FRSL 211D)
6 credits
U.S. History

Six credits out of 18 credits in French have been fulfilled. In addition, you have been granted 6 advanced standing credits as elective courses. Therefore, you must complete 12 credits in French Language to fulfill your B.A. Freshman Core requirement.

In essence, keep in mind the following when selecting your courses for Option 2:

Advanced standing credits + McGill credits = 18 credits in French and 12 credits elective courses.

Advanced standing credits + McGill credits = 30 credits for Freshman year.

Translation: Once you have successfully completed 24 credits, including advanced standing credits, you may proceed to your U1 year.

Still CONFUSED?

For both Options, an adviser will be able to help you determine how many credits you must take to complete your freshman program requirements.

First Year Seminars

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide closer interaction with professors and peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars focus on the latest scholarly developments in the field and expose students to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some have lower enrolment caps.

Arts students may take only one First-Year Seminar, from either the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science listings. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one.

Below is a complete listing of Arts courses for 2016-2017.

Arts FYS

 

HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

ISLA 199 FYS: Narr of the Middle East 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

ITAL 199 FYS:Italy's Lit in Context 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

LLCU 199 FYS: Literary Animals 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

Science FYS

CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry? 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Explor. 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 
 
 
 

Program Selection

After the completion of their first year, Freshman U0 students should be ready to select a departmental program for the upcoming academic year.

 

Students selecting a program should choose an area that fits their general academic interests and background. The bachelor's degree is intended to serve as a general preliminary step in the pursuit of major career goals. Students in the Bachelor of Arts degree follow a multi-track program permitting them to register in at least two and as many as four different Major and Minor Concentrations. This allows them to select courses from a variety of areas in their first year, from where they will able to narrow their choice later on.

It is important that students become familiar with the academic regulations of the Faculty of Arts. An intended course plan may not be feasible if it requires the completion of too many credits from other faculties, or if it is not listed in the calendar.

Undecided students should consider their basic strengths and weaknesses when considering the following:

  • preferred subjects
  • the departmental programs which include them
  • whether they have previously completed courses in these disciplines
  • programs which contain more than one of these subjects
  • whether one program stands out above all others
  • whether an Honours or a Faculty program is a viable option
  • whether there is room for electives
  • whether programs are related to vocational or personal interests
  • academic and career goals and whether there are certain academic prerequisites that must be completed to pursue them
  • the intention to develop certain skills (analytical reasoning, writing, verbal communication, teamwork, independent work, laboratory research, computer skills, etc.)
  • program requirements which may focus on weak points (e.g.: an Arts student considering a program requiring statistics if a student is not strong in math, etc.)

Students who are still unsure about their program choice should consider consulting Degree Planning. Alternatively, you can use following resources:

Once program adviser(s) have been consulted and you have chosen program(s), students must select courses according to departmental requirements.

It is important to refer to the eCalendar as well as individual departmental handbooks available on the Web and/or through the departments themselves.

Most courses chosen in the first year at McGill will be at the 200 level, with the exception of language courses, where the appropriate level will be determined by a placement test administered by the department offering the course. The first digit of the course number normally denotes the course level.

When registering for courses, it is the student's responsibility to ensure that all prerequisites have been met.

U1 Departmental

 

Arts Departmental Program Fair

This event, held during Orientation Week on the day after Discover McGill, is a great way to discover all the programs offered to you in the Faculty of Arts. You will be able to meet Departmental Advisers and ask them questions about your programs of interest and discuss your course selection. This year, the fair will take place on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 from 1:00 - 3:00 in the SSMU Ballroom. Details are available on Facebook.

First Year Seminars

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide closer interaction with professors and peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars focus on the latest scholarly developments in the field and expose students to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some have lower enrolment caps.

Arts students may take only one First-Year Seminar, from either the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science listings. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one.

Below is a complete listing of Arts courses for 2016-2017.

Arts FYS

HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

ISLA 199 FYS: Narr of the Middle East 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

ITAL 199 FYS:Italy's Lit in Context 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

LLCU 199 FYS: Literary Animals 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

Science FYS

CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry? 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Explor. 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 
 
 

Program Selection

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their B.A. degree requirements (3-year degree) must select a program at the time of registration. Students in the Bachelor of Arts degree follow the Multi-track system, Honours programs, Joint Honours programs, and Faculty programs.

  • The Multi-track system recognizes the diversity of student backgrounds and interests and the multiple routes to understanding provided by a modern university. The multi-track system includes a major concentration complemented by a second major concentration or by one or two minor concentrations.
  • Honours programs demand a high degree of specialisation, and require students to satisfy specific departmental and Faculty requirements while maintaining a good academic standing. They are designed to prepare students for graduate study within a specific discipline.
  • Joint Honours programs allow students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines to combine Joint Honours components from any two Arts disciplines.
  • Faculty programs are approved selections of courses constituting a concentration in an intellectually coherent and inter-faculty field of studies.
  • Course and program requirements
  • The McGill University eCalendar provides detailed program information and course descriptions for each academic department, but cannot alone provide assistance in realistic and meaningful program planning.

Advanced Standing

Newly admitted students may receive advanced standing for university work completed elsewhere, or in another faculty at McGill, or for results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, Advanced Placement tests or the Diploma of Collegial Studies. 

It is essential that you verify if you will be granted credit and course exemption for work completed elsewhere as you will not be given additional credit towards your degree for any McGill course if the content overlaps substantially with any other course for which you have already received credit, such as for advanced standing results. For information about advanced standing credits, please refer to the following: advanced standing and placement examinations. 

If you have completed university courses elsewhere, prior to beginning your studies at McGill, make sure that you provide your departmental program adviser with a copy of your university transcripts and course descriptions when you meet for your advising appointment. Your departmental adviser will be able to inform you about possible course equivalences and exemptions from your program requirements.

When meeting with your adviser, you should also take with you the Transfer Credit/Student Adjustment Form. Once the form is completed and signed, you should return it to Service Point for processing (don't forget to make a copy for yourself). As departmental advisers are not available until just before the start of term, please register for courses you consider appropriate, and then adjust your registration once your course equivalences have been determined

Departmental Academic Advisers

Please see here for a current list of departmental academic advisers.

There are two types of advising for U1 (departmental) students.

1. Departmental Academic Advising (Program Advisers):

Departmental Academic Advisers are very familiar with the requirements of their Honours, Major Concentration, and Minor Concentration programs. They give specific information about prerequisites, courses, approval for required courses and program selection. Since they are also generally members of McGill University's academic staff, they can also provide useful insight into potential options for further study in their respective disciplines. It is possible to change programs if necessary, provided that there has been consultation with the appropriate advisers.

These advisers will be available at CSI McGill (on June 9, 2016) and just before the start of the fall term. Some departments may have advisers available earlier. Check with your department and meet with a departmental adviser. Most departments hold orientation sessions during the last week of August. After meeting with a departmental adviser, use Minerva to make any recommended changes to courses for which you have already registered.


2.  Arts OASIS Advising (Faculty of Arts Advisers):

Arts OASIS Faculty Advisers and Peer Advisers are available to provide you with information and to answer your questions.  You can contact us in person at our counter (Dawson Hall, room 110), by telephone at 514-398-1029, by online chat or by adviser [dot] arts [at] mcgill [dot] ca (email).  For our hours of operation please visit the Arts OASIS homepageWhen emailing us, please include your name and student number in the subject line. Make sure to use your new McGill email address, which should be activated as soon as you confirm that you will be attending McGill. Allow at least seven (7) business days for an adviser to respond to your questions. Please do not send your questions to more than one adviser as this will slow the advising process and result in longer delays for you and all other students.

Important dates for advising, registration, and orientation

For a list of important upcoming dates for 2016-2017, please see here


 

Special/Visiting/Exchange

 

Orientation, advising and registration information

You are invited to attend McGill's Orientation Events August 28 to September 3, 2016 for Newly Admitted students. Advisers from Arts OASIS will be on hand to answer all your questions concerning your overall B.A. degree.

For course selection, advising, and registration information for 2016-2017 newly admitted Special, Visiting and Exchange students, please consult the Important Dates and e-calendar .

All new international students should also refer to the information offered by International Student Services.

Select your courses for the term using Minerva (you will have to sign in). You can also view course descriptions on the Programs, Courses and University Regulations website.

Discuss course changes with your departmental adviser(s) who will approve them if appropriate. Use Minerva to make the changes to your record.


Throughout the year

Continued Advising

If you have questions about your course selection, consult with an adviser in the department that administers the courses.

You will be receiving emails from Arts OASIS during your time at McGill. Make sure you read these emails carefully as they will contain important information.

If you have questions, you can meet with a Faculty Adviser during drop-in sessions held throughout the academic year. Please come to the Arts OASIS counter (Dawson Hall, Room 110) or call 514-398-1029, Monday through Friday between 10:00 am and 4:00pm. If you have a simple question, you can email adviser [dot] arts [at] mcgill [dot] ca (be sure to include your name and student number in the subject line). Also, please make sure to use your McGill email account.


General advising and course information

Steps to follow for course selection, advising, and registration for newly admitted students.

Please read the information carefully.

Please consult the Important Dates webpage for details (you can search by category).

You should plan to attend the University orientation session and one of the departmental orientation sessions offered during the last week of August. Go to the session offered by the department in which you are taking most of your courses and ensure you are assigned an adviser.

Course Selection

In order to determine which courses will be appropriate for you, your departmental academic adviser will require information about the courses you have taken at your home university. For departmental contact information, please consult the following website.

Please bring the following pieces of information to your advising appointment:

  • a copy of your academic record (courses and grades);
  • course descriptions for the courses you have taken;
  • information about the number of credits or courses required to complete your degree;
  • a list of McGill courses you think might be appropriate;
  • a list of questions you want to ask your adviser.

The departmental academic adviser will review the courses you have already completed to ensure you have the appropriate background for the McGill courses you intend to take.

For more general advice, you can contact us Arts OASIS (Dawson Hall, Room 110). The OASIS counter staff are very knowledgeable and would be more than happy to assist you. You can come in person or phone 514-398-1029. Please consult the Arts OASIS Homepage for operating hours.

Course Information

Each course has a credit weight associated with it. The normal load for a full-time student in Arts is five (5) courses or 15 credits per term. The number of credits you take in a term should be determined by your own situation. If you have commitments outside the University, you might consider reducing your load to 12 credits per term (this is normally the minimum for those studying on a student visa).

Course selection should be done with your departmental academic adviser. The courses you take should also be chosen with your personal situation in mind. If this is the first time you are studying in English, you might want to mix program courses, electives and an English as a Second Language (ESL) course. If you have studied in English before, but feel that your writing could be improved, you might want to consider taking English for Academic Purposes. Click here for more information.

During the first two weeks of the Fall or Winter term, you will have the opportunity to change the courses for which you have registered. You may drop and add courses as you wish, subject to any restrictions indicated in the eCalendar and Timetable. After this Course Change period, you may withdraw from courses until approximately the mid-point of each term. Please consult Important Dates for specific deadlines.

If you are undecided about whether to drop or withdraw from a course, you can talk to your departmental adviser or to a Faculty adviser in Arts OASIS. You should assess your progress to date in the course and try to reach a realistic evaluation of your ability to complete the course successfully.

Special, visiting or exchange students who wish to extend their studies beyond the term(s) indicated in their letter of acceptance should write to the Associate Dean of Arts (Student Affairs) and request readmission.

What to do if problems arise

Occasionally students experience serious problems which affect their ability to complete their coursework on time. If you experience medical problems, or other personal problems which prevent you from devoting sufficient time to your courses or exams, please see your course instructor and/or Faculty adviser.

If the situation interferes with the submission of term papers, the writing of midterm tests, or other class work, consult with the course instructor. It may be possible to arrange for make-up tests or extensions of deadlines. The instructor will require supporting documentation in the form of a doctor's letter, or other relevant documents.

If you are unable to write formal final exams, or feel that withdrawal from courses or the University after the normal deadline may be necessary, you should consult with a Faculty adviser in Arts OASIS. If special arrangements are to be made, supporting documentation will be required.

More detailed information on Course and University Withdrawal is available here.

Contact

adviser [dot] arts [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Arts OASIS Faculty Adviser)
Dawson Hall
514-398-1029

Transfer

You are invited to attend McGill's Transfer Student Orientation & Information Session on Thursday September 1, 2016 from 10:00-11:30 in Leacock 232

For more information on the completion of your BA Degree, please consult the information in the U1 Departmental Section of the Arts Oasis Website. Much of the information will help acquaint you with University policies and faculty regulations. You are encouraged to meet with a Faculty Adviser at Arts Oasis to better go over degree planning and track the progression of your Degree. 

Please consult McGill's Transfer Credits homepage for information on transfer credits earned prior to beginning your studies at McGill. 

The Transfer Credit/Student Adjustment Form is to be used by students enrolled in the Faculty of Arts who have already been assigned non‐specific transfer credit upon admission on the basis of university course work completed prior to entry to McGill. These non‐specific transfer credits can be seen on the McGill Minerva transcript as TRNS XXX. This form permits the relevant department to indicate specific McGill course exemption(s) arising from the assigned transfer credits, allowing students to take full advantage of course work already completed and to avoid repeating course work unnecessarily. Students should meet with their McGill departmental program advisers to discuss whether courses completed prior to McGill can be used towards their program of study and part of their degree plan.  Make a copy of the completed form for your records and bring the form toService Point for processing.

Second Undergraduate Degree Students Pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree

 

You are considered a second degree student if you have completed a previous degree at McGill University or at another recognized university/institution and are now completing a second undergraduate degree at McGill University.

Please note the following:

Applications for a second degree in the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) must be made directly to McGill University, Enrolment Services. Please go to www.mcgill.ca/applying/ for more information.

Second degree students in the B.A. degree must complete 60 credits at McGill University.

The multi-track system requires that students complete a Major Concentration (36 credits), with at least a Minor Concentration (18 credits).

1. Second degree students are permitted to complete a Major Concentration and a Minor Concentration in the same academic unit.
2. Second degree students pursuing an Honours or Faculty Program in the Faculty of Arts are not required to complete a Minor Concentration.
3. Please see general degree requirements for more information.

Second degree students are strongly advised to meet with their departmental advisers before the Add/Drop deadlines in the Fall and Winter terms.

1.Departmental advisers will ensure that second degree students are on track for their program requirements and will approve course selections. 
2. For a listing of departmental advisers, please go to here.

Credits that you have completed for your first degree may not be applied towards the 60 credits needed to complete your second degree.  Please note that the Cumulative Point Average (CGPA) from your first degree will not be calculated into the CGPA of your second degree. For further information concerning GPA calculation, please access the eCalendar.

While you cannot receive credits for courses already taken in your previous degree, you may receive course exemption for courses you passed with a grade of C or better and that have been evaluated as equivalent to a McGill course.

1. Please see your departmental adviser regarding courses you have previously taken that might exempt you from one or more program requirement(s).
2. In cases where a course exemption is approved, these credits will have to be replaced by an approved substitute course taken at McGill.

Second degree students are strongly advised to meet with their Faculty Adviser in Arts OASIS upon beginning their B.A. degree.

3. Your Faculty Adviser will ensure that you are meeting the overall requirements of your 60 credit B.A. degree. 
4. Your Faculty Adviser will assist you should you experience any issues that may have an impact on your overall academic performance.
5. How can you contact your Faculty Adviser?
       A.  You can meet with your Faculty Adviser during their drop-in advising hours (please refer to the drop-in schedule tab on the Arts OASIS homepage).
       B.  You can book an appointment with your Faculty Adviser by sending him/her an e-mail with your availabilities.
       C. You can simply e-mail your questions to your Faculty Adviser. Please include your name and ID# in all your correspondence.
       D.  You can also direct your general questions to the Arts OASIS counter (Dawson Hall, Room 110) or by telephone: 514-398-1029