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Abstracts and other publications

Demonstrating theory in practice
Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.

Nursing approaches
Working with family strengths and resources.

Modèle de McGill et clsc
Une combinaison gagnante / The McGill model and local community service centers. A fetching combination. [Article in French]

Classification systems for health concerns, nursing strategies, and client outcomes
Nursing practice with families who have a child with a chronic illness.

The McGill model of nursing
Children with a chronic condition: Who benefits, and why?

Nursing intervention studies
Issues related to change and timing.

Integration
Nursing model into a local community service center.

Development of professional practice
Practice based on the McGill model of nursing in an ambulatory care setting.

Books

A perspective on health, family, learning, and collaborative nursing: a collection of writings on the McGill model of nursing.
Laurie N. Gottlieb, Helene Ezer, editors. McGill University, School of Nursing, Montreal, Canada c1997.

The Collaborative Partnership Approach To Care: A Delicate Balance.
Laurie N. Gottlieb, Nancy Feeley, and Cindy Dalton Toronto : Elsevier Mosby, 2005


Demonstrating theory in practice: examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.

Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing. 32(2):77-85, 2001 Mar-Apr.
Gaudine A.P.
School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's Newfoundland

An important test for a model of nursing is its usefulness in practice. One-hundred and forty-seven nurses in one hospital attended a 2-day workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing. An evaluation of this workshop showed the usefulness of the McGill model. Self-efficacy for performing the model increased, as did behaviors and performance related to nursing by this model. Self-reports and supervisor reports measured these increases 6 months after the workshop. Further, the implementation of the model led to staff nurses initiating bottom-up changes in the nursing department. Boundary conditions or factors outside of the workshop content that enhanced the adoption of the model are described.


Nursing approaches for working with family strengths and resources.
Journal of Family Nursing, 2000, 6(1), 9-24.
Feeley, N., & Gottlieb, L.
McGill School of Nursing

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in shifting the focus of clinical practice with families from a deficit to a strengths-based perspective. The concept of individual and family strengths is central to the McGill Model of Nursing, yet there has been little description of the construct and how it can be used in practice. Through an examination of the practice of expert nurses and the approached used in the assessment of families' strengths and resources, planning and interventions were elucidated. This article describes how clinicians can identify and provide feedback concerning strengths, identify resources and help families develop and call forth strengths, mobilize and use resources, and regulate the input of these resources. (PubMed Abstract).


Modèle de McGill et clsc: une combinaison gagnante / The McGill model and local community service centers. A fetching combination. [Article in French]
L'Infirmière du Québec, vol. 6 no 2, novembre/décembre 1998, 28-35.
Malo D., Cote S., Giguere V., O'Reilly L.
Service de santé au CLSC Saint-Louis-du-Parc

How can the use of a specific conceptual model help nurses provide care that is best suited to their clients' real needs? The McGill model, for example, seems to be appropriate to community health applications, for it concentrates on health promotion and brings together all the elements underlying a family-development view of care. The authors of this article describe the basics of the McGill model in terms of the four concepts of the nursing metaparadigm: health, the person, the environment and nursing, and discuss a concrete example of a health situation. (PubMed Abstract)


Classification systems for health concerns, nursing strategies, and client outcomes: Nursing practice with families who have a child with a chronic illness.
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research 1998 Spring,30(1):45-59
Feeley N., Gottlieb L.N.
Department of Nursing, Montreal Children's Hospital, Quebec.

This paper describes 3 classification systems developed from a study of the effectiveness of a nursing intervention in improving the psychosocial adjustment of children with a chronic illness. Nurses' documentation of the nursing care provided to the 163 participating families was content analyzed. Systems were developed to classify the types of: (a) health concerns or issues that were the focus of the nursing, (b) actions the nurses used to help families achieve their goals, and (c) outcomes observed by the nurses. These classification systems have furthered our understanding of the McGill Model of Nursing, and they describe the scope of nursing practice based on this nursing perspective with a particular population (families who have a child with a chronic illness). These systems could be used to describe and measure nursing practice with this and other groups of clients. Clinical trial. Randomized controlled trial. (PubMed Abstract)


The McGill model of nursing and children with a chronic condition: Who benefits, and why?
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research 1996 Fall;28(3):29-48
Gottlieb L.N., & Feeley N.
McGill University School of Nursing

This study sought to understand why and how the psychosocial adjustment of children between the ages of four and 16 with a chronic illness was improved by a year-long nursing trial (1990-1991), guided by the McGill Model of Nursing. We examined the characteristics of children whose adjustment improved (improvers), who remained within the normal range (adjusted), and who deteriorated (clinical rangers). Improvers and clinical rangers presented with similar characteristics, and a profile analysis was conducted to understand why one group improved while the other did not. Four pathways leading to improvement were identified. The effectiveness of the nursing appeared to be related to engagement with the nurse and to features of the nursing. (PubMed Abstract)


Nursing intervention studies: issues related to change and timing.
Canadian Journal of Nursing Research 1995 Spring;27(1):13-29
Gottlieb L.N., Feeley N.
McGill University School of Nursing

A variety of challenges confront clinicians and researchers involved in developing and testing nursing interventions or programs for children and their families. Many of these challenges relate to the issues of change and timing. This paper discusses some of the critical questions that must be considered when designing and evaluating interventions with this particular population. Issues are illustrated with examples from a study that tested the effectiveness of a nursing intervention (based on the McGill Model of Nursing) in improving the psychosocial adjustment of chronically ill children. The authors propose that careful consideration of these questions will improve the design of intervention studies, the evaluation of their outcomes, as well as contribute to the development of our knowledge in this domain. (PubMed Abstract)


Integration of a nursing model into a local community service center
[Article in French] Canadian Nurse/L'Infirmière canadienne, vol. 89, no 3, mars 1993, pp. 37 à 40
Dalton C., Ranger C.
McGill School of Nursing

Four years ago, maternal/child health nurses at a local community health center in Montreal found themselves in a crisis situation. Their work consisted of varying tasks, with little time to reflect on their work. The nursing team decided to meet with a nurse consultant to evaluate and further develop their clinical practice. The postnatal home visit was selected as a focus for discussion. The team soon recognized the need for nurses to have a similar framework to guide their work. The McGill Model of Nursing (1987) was chosen and integrated into the team's practice. The article describes the major concepts within the McGill Model. The ecomap by Wright and Leahy (1984) is presented as a useful tool to describe family structure and functioning. The process of integrating a nursing model within a practice setting is continuously evolving and is a rewarding experience for nurses. (Author Abstract)


Development of professional practice based on the McGill model of nursing in an ambulatory care setting.
Journal of Advanced Nursing 1992 Jul;17(7):801-8
Feeley N., Gerez-Lirette T.
McGill University, School of Nursing, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

This paper describes the efforts of nurses to explore, develop and implement professional nursing practice, based on the McGill model of nursing, within an existing ambulatory paediatric setting. The model facilitated the development of a unique role for nurses in a multidisciplinary team, as it served as the framework for the conceptualization of the nursing role, assessment of families' needs, and the development of a nursing knowledge base. Strategies utilized to develop a 'complemental role' and its inherent professional practice are described. The issues and obstacles which arose as nurses developed their practice are discussed and the outcomes of this development for clients, nurses and the profession are highlighted.(PubMed Abstract)

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