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Research and Discovery

A breakthrough for organic reactions in water

Fri, 2014-07-04 10:00

By Chris Chipello

Green-chemistry researchers at McGill have discovered a way to use water as a solvent in one of the reactions most widely used to synthesize chemical products and pharmaceuticals.

The findings, published June 26 in Nature Communications, mark a potential milestone in efforts to develop organic reactions in water.

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A tiny molecule may help battle depression

Researchers find a small molecule that predicts treatment response for depressed patients

By Cynthia Lee

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Melatonin makes old bones stronger; research on elderly rats may have implications for osteoporosis

Mon, 2014-05-26 11:29

By Katherine Gombay

“Old rats are tedious to work with,” says Faleh Tamimi, a professor in the School of Dentistry. “They get sick a lot and that means they also cost a lot more. But if you’re interested in aging and diseases like osteoporosis they’re an essential part of the process.” Tamimi is the leader of a McGill team which has just discovered that supplements of melatonin make bones stronger in elderly rats and therefore, potentially, in humans too.

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What doesn’t kill you may make you live longer

Wed, 2014-05-14 12:28

McGill research finds unexpected link between cell suicide and longevity

By Cynthia Lee

What is the secret to aging more slowly and living longer? Not antioxidants, apparently.

Many people believe that free radicals, the sometimes-toxic molecules produced by our bodies as we process oxygen, are the culprit behind aging. Yet a number of studies in recent years have produced evidence that the opposite may be true.

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Neutron star magnetic fields: not so turbulent, after all?

Thu, 2014-05-08 06:29

New findings could help advance understanding of matter at extreme densities

By Chris Chipello

Neutron stars, the extraordinarily dense stellar bodies created when massive stars collapse, are known to host the strongest magnetic fields in the universe – as much as a billion times more powerful than any man-made electromagnet. But some neutron stars are much more strongly magnetized than others, and this disparity has long puzzled astrophysicists.

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Of mice and men

Mon, 2014-04-28 16:10

 

Mice and rats stressed by male experimenters; reaction may skew research findings

By Chris Chipello

Scientists’ inability to replicate research findings using mice and rats has contributed to mounting concern over the reliability of such studies.

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Pain curbs sex drive in female mice, but not in males

Wed, 2014-04-23 11:32

Findings could help scientists study pain-inhibited sexual desire in humans

By Chris Chipello

“Not tonight, dear, I have a headache.” Generally speaking, that line is attributed to the wife in a couple, implying that women’s sexual desire is more affected by pain than men’s.

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Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Sat, 2014-04-19 10:27

Youngest children from most vulnerable populations benefit most

By Cynthia Lee

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal, suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight.

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Researchers land $3.5-million DFAT grant to improve health and agriculture in Ghana

Thu, 2014-04-17 16:24

By McGill Reporter Staff

Students, faculty and staff put aside their busy end-of-term agendas at the Macdonald campus today to learn about how the Government of Canada is supporting the Building Capacity for Sustainable Livelihoods and Health project.

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Odds that global warming is due to natural factors: slim to none

Sat, 2014-04-12 08:22

Statistical analysis rules out natural-warming hypothesis with more than 99 per cent certainty

An analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth’s climate, according to a new study by McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

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