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autism

Fragile X study offers hope of new autism treatment

Drug reverses behavioural symptoms in mice with a version of autism
Thu, 2014-11-27 13:46
Fragile-X Syndrome

People affected by a common inherited form of autism could be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer, according to researchers from the University of Edinburgh and McGill University.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: McGill University
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Office Phone: 514-398-6754

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Jen Middleton
Organization: University of Edinburgh
Office Phone: +44 131 650 6514
Source Site: /newsroom

Autism spectrum disorders share common molecular causes

Overlapping features across different genetic disorders related to autism may lead to similar therapeutic approaches
Thu, 2014-10-09 14:03

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Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514.398.6754
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Source Site: /newsroom

Over $3.7M awarded to McGill researchers

Prime Minister Stephen Harper announces funding for researchers studying neurodevelopmental disorders from Government of Canada, 
The Azrieli Foundation and Brain Canada
Thu, 2014-05-01 12:46

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Source Site: /newsroom

McGill experts: Autism Awareness Month

Thu, 2014-03-27 12:15

Contact Information

Contact: Raphael Larocque-Cyr
Organization: McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6693
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Source Site: /newsroom

New hope for understanding autism spectrum disorders

Researchers at McGill University and the University of Montreal uncover a crucial link between protein synthesis and autism spectrum disorders
Wed, 2012-11-21 13:00

Researchers from McGill University and the University of Montreal have identified a crucial link between protein synthesis and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which can bolster new therapeutic avenues. Regulation of protein synthesis, also termed mRNA translation, is the process by which cells manufacture proteins. This mechanism is involved in all aspects of cell and organism function. A new study in mice has found that abnormally high synthesis of a group of neuronal proteins called neuroligins results in symptoms similar to those diagnosed in ASD. The study also reveals that autism-like behaviors can be rectified in adult mice with compounds inhibiting protein synthesis, or with gene-therapy targeting neuroligins. Their results are published in the journal Nature.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations, McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
Organization: Media Relations, Université de Montréal
Office Phone: 514-343-7593
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom