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Performance Examinations,Tutorials & Ensembles

On This Page:

Practical Exams - performance programs  | Recital Exams  | Recital Exams Programs  |
Graduate Conducting Recital Guidelines | Recording Project MUPG 605 |
Interdisciplinary Project 1 - MUPG 606 | Interdisciplinary Project 2- MUPG 607  |
Guidelines for Vocal Pedagogy Workshop | Guidelines for Perf in Recording Media - MUPG 659 | Guidelines for Programme Notes - All M.Mus and GDPP Performance Students |
Guidelines for Song Texts (Voice Students Only) | Guidelines for D.Mus. Lecture Recital & Doctoral Paper |
Performance Tutorials (practical instruction - performance program) | Vocal Repertoire Coaching (Voice Students)
Ensembles | Quick Study Guidelines

Practical examinations (performance programs)

Students intending to perform examination recitals, repertoire examinations and quick study examinations must include the appropriate course number, as listed under the program requirements listed in the Graduate Programs, Courses and University Regulations calendar[pdf]).

Recital examinations

All students in the performance programs are required to perform in one or more public recitals. These recitals are usually scheduled in Pollack Concert Hall, Redpath Hall or Tanna Schulich Hall. (Organ recitals may be held off campus where appropriate.) It is the student's responsibility to:

  1. In consultation with the Performance Tutorial teacher, book a date with the Concert Office (Room C208). Because the teacher is on the examination panel, this must be a date when the teacher is free to attend. As the deadline for submitting marks for Spring graduation is the beginning of May, students wishing to graduate in Spring (May/June convocation) must play their final recital examination before May 1.
  2. Complete a recital examination application form available here . This form should be submitted to the Graduate Studies Office three months before the recital date (five months for recitals in September or October) as they have to be approved by the Department of Performance Graduate Sub-Committee.  Please note that there will be a $100 fee for applications submitted after the deadline.

Any subsequent changes to the program must be approved by the student's teacher, the Area Chair and the Department Chair. Requests for changes must by the student's teacher, in writing, through the Graduate Studies Coordinator.

The examining panel for all Master's recitals consists of three members, one of whom is the candidate's teacher, selected from the list of approved examiners attached to the recital examination application form. For DMus solo recitals, the examination panel consists of two members from the list of approved examiners, one of whom is the student's teacher, plus one external examiner.

The final mark for the recital (except for conducting recitals) will be an average of the three grades submitted by the three examiners. See Recital Adjustication Policy [pdf]).

For the DMus Lecture-Recital, the examination panel consists of the student's Advisory Committee. The lecture-recital is judged on a Pass/Fail basis. In order to pass, all examiners must submit a passing grade for the recital.

If the examination panel wishes to have copies of the music for the examination, the student will be asked to provide these. Please note that these should not be photocopies. (See Appendix i: Music and Copyright: Questions and Answers).

If a student receives a failing grade, the student has the choice of repeating the same recital for the same panel within six weeks or devising a new program for a new panel within one year. If the student opts to play a new program, no more that 20 minutes (50% for jazz examinations) of the original program may be repeated. A failed recital may be repeated only once. Students who fail a recital a second time will be asked to withdraw from the program. Students must re-apply for this examination, and a supplemental examination fee will be charged, payable when the application is submitted.

An approved and scheduled recital may be cancelled for medical reasons only. For further information concerning cancellations please consult Appendix ii: Cancellation/Postponement Policy for Pollack Hall, Redpath Hall, Tanna Schulich Hall and Off-Campus Venues. A request for recital cancellation for medical reasons must be accompanied by a medical report from the candidate's personal physician or the McGill Health Service. Such requests should be addressed to the Chair of the Performance Department, and submitted to the Graduate Studies Office and the Concert Office.

Recital examination programs

The recital program must be determined in consultation with, and approved by, the candidate's performance teacher. Each recital program must include a minimum of 60 minutes of music, and should not exceed 75 minutes, except for conducting exams (please see below for conducting and opera roles examination guidelines).

Students are encouraged to include contemporary (particularly Canadian) works in their program. Chamber Music examination recitals may include music prepared in a chamber music ensemble course. No concerti are permitted on examination recital programs, with the exception of woodwind and brass instruments, double bass, viola and early music instruments. The repertoire for vocal examinations should be selected from solo vocal repertoire originally composed for voice and piano, unless approval is obtained from the Vocal Area prior to submission of the recital form to the Graduate Studies Office. For sample programs see Appendix iii: Sample Recital Examination Programs.

Area specific requirements for examination recitals

Graduate Conducting Recital Guidelines:

M.Mus. in Orchestral Conducting

Recital I:

30 minutes of repertoire to be performed with the Beethoven Orchestra in a semi-public performance (no publicity), in the Spring of the first year.

 •Performance will be evaluated on successful completion of a rehearsal, followed by the recital.  

•The rehearsal will be marked on a Pass/Fail basis, where pass is understood to be at the graduate level of a B+, with at least two of the three-member panel giving a passing grade.  Adjudicators must be selected in line with the policy listed on the Recital Adjudication Policy. (e.g. One of the panel members should be a member of the string area, in any case a professional orchestra musician.)

•The rehearsal will be scheduled at the mid-point of the rehearsal period.  (Students cannot proceed to do the recital until they pass the rehearsal). The recital will be graded according to the Schulich School of Music Recital Adjudication Policy.  

•Students must also prepare program notes in line with the guidelines stipulated in the Graduate Handbook. The student cannot pass a recital until the program notes have been passed.

Recital II: 30 – 40 minutes of repertoire to be performed by the Beethoven Orchestra, (which the student may augment with musicians of their own choosing in the final weeks), in semi-public performance (not publicized), usually in the Spring of the second year.  Repertoire should be selected in consultation with the teacher and the departmental chair and in light of the music’s difficulty and size of orchestra

 •The performance will be evaluated on successful completion of a rehearsal, followed by the recital.

 •The rehearsal will be marked on a Pass/Fail basis, where pass is understood to be at the graduate level of a B+, with at least two of the three-member panel giving a passing grade. Adjudicators must be selected in line with the policy listed on the Recital Adjudication Policy. (e.g. One of the panel members should be a member of the string area, in any case a professional orchestra musician.)

•The rehearsal will be scheduled at the mid-point of the rehearsal period.  (Students cannot proceed to do the recital until the rehearsal has been passed) The recital will be graded according to the Schulich School of Music Recital Adjudication Policy.  

•Students must also prepare program notes in line with the guidelines stipulated in the Graduate Handbook. The student cannot pass a recital until the program notes have been passed.

D. Mus. in Orchestral Conducting

Recital I:  

•40 minutes of repertoire with a self-arranged orchestra, in public performance, usually to be held in February or March in a public performance of the winter session in the first year.

•Repertoire should be selected in consultation with the teacher and the departmental chair and in light of the music’s difficulty and size of orchestra: it should be doable with the assembled musicians in 4 rehearsals starting approximately two – three weeks before the concert.

•Rehearsals and venues (in consultation with the Concert Office) to be arranged by the student and confirmed with the Graduate Studies Office at the time the recital program is approved by Graduate Performance Committee.

•Either this program or the second recital should include a soloist.

•Performance will be evaluated on successful completion of a rehearsal, followed by the recital.

•The rehearsal will be marked on a Pass/Fail basis, where pass is understood to be at the graduate level of a B+, with at least two of the three-member panel giving a passing grade. Adjudicators must be selected in line with the policy listed on the Recital Adjudication Policy. (e.g. One of the panel members should be a member of the string area, in any case a professional orchestra musician.)

•The rehearsal will be scheduled at the mid-point of the rehearsal period.  Students cannot proceed to do the recital until the rehearsal has been passed.

•The recital will be graded according to the Schulich School of Music Recital Adjudication Policy.  

Recital II:

•40 minutes of repertoire, consisting of some combination of repertoire with a McGill orchestral ensemble in a performance typically in February (part of Opera rotation) selected in consultation with the teacher and the departmental chair in light of the music’s difficulty and the size of the ensemble to be rehearsed in 3-4 rehearsals spread over 8 half rehearsals. The repertoire should involve a soloist if the first recital did not have one and a contemporary work, preferably a new commission by a composition student selected in collaboration with the Composition Area.

•The performance will be evaluated on successful completion of a rehearsal, followed by the recital.

•The rehearsal will be marked on a Pass/Fail basis, where pass is understood to be at the graduate level of a B+, with at least two of the three-member panel giving a passing grade. Adjudicators must be selected in line with the policy listed on the Recital Adjudication Policy. (e.g. One of the panel members should be a member of the string area, in any case a professional orchestra musician.)

•The rehearsal will be scheduled at the mid-point of the rehearsal period.  Students cannot proceed to do the recital until the rehearsal has been passed.

•The recital will be graded according to the Schulich School of Music Recital Adjudication Policy.

Lecture – Recital:

The recital component stemming from the research discussed in the lecture will consist of:

•35 minutes of repertoire to be performed by an ensemble arranged by the student according to the specific needs of the research projects.

•Performance, usually to be held in the Winter/Spring semester of the second year. Repertoire should be selected in consultation with the teacher, the student’s D. Mus. committee, and in light of the music’s difficulty.

For further details, see the complete guidelines for D.Mus. Lecture-Recital and Doctoral Paper on the music website:    http://www.mcgill.ca/music/current-students/graduate/graduate-music-handbook/performance-examstutorials-ensembles.

Piano

Memorization is compulsory, except for late twentieth-century repertoire with permission of the piano area chair.

Voice

Candidates are required to provide an accompanying document for their recitals. For details please see the Guidelines for Song Texts (voice students only) with the Recital Application Form [pdf].

The repertoire for vocal recitals (MUPG 600, MUPG 601 and MUPG 602) should be selected from repertoire originally composed for voice and keyboard or voice and chamber ensemble. Concert arias are permitted. Opera and Oratorio arias are not permitted.

Opera Roles

The following guidelines should be used for Opera Performance students and for Vocal Performance students doing an opera role as a substitution for an exam recital: The website run by AGMA (the U.S. singer’s union) that has a “schedule C” listing of practically every opera with the roles categorized: Leading, Featured, Supporting and Chorus Bit be used for determining what roles students use for an exam. This categorization is for opera companies to determine fee status for singers when negotiating with agents, as well as for determining what roles AGMA choristers should sing. Any role listed as “Leading” (“L”) should be worthy. A role listed as “Featured” (“F”) could be considered only after the student submits a reason for why the role should be considered. The website is: AGMA website.

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Recording Project, MUPG 605

Students will complete a recording project ranging in length from 25 to 40 minutes of music approved by the department.  Students will be responsible for selecting the music, selecting a sound engineer, arranging for recording facilities, and supervising post-production.  Repertoire may have been performed before, but it is expected that the student will prepare for the recording session and that the recording session will unfold outside the context of a live concert.   Students must submit a proposal describing the repertoire, reasons for the selection of the repertoire, as well as list the detail of the recording sessions, including name of sound engineer, a statement of commitment from the sound engineer, dates, recording location, and scheduled dates for post-production.  The proposal (see Section 2 of Recital Application Form [pdf] must be submitted to the Music Graduate Studies Office for approval by the Graduate Performance Sub-Committee at least three months before the project is scheduled to begin (5 months for projects to start in September or October).  The completed recording will be due, at the latest, three months, after its approval and should be accompanied by liner notes describing each selection and the themes which connect the selections one to the other as a recording.  In the context of a solo instrumental or vocal program, some chamber music may be included.

 The project will be graded as a concert recital, by a jury including the student's teacher, and two other members from the list of recommended panel members for the student's instrument and program. Consideration will be given to the musicality of the performance, the quality of the presentation, and the professionalism of the presentation, including liner notes.  For further details on the recital grading policy: see Recital Adjudication Policy [pdf].

Sound recording students may be contacted through the following link:  http://www.music.mcgill.ca/sr/. In the event that students do not work with a student sound engineer who will be receiving credit for the project, the student is responsible for all costs involved.  Students will book a hall as they do for a regular recital.

Interdisciplinary Project I, MUPG 606

Students complete a research-creation project involving collaboration between different disciplines resulting in a new work, interpretation or contribution to knowledge presented in public (i.e., performer-composer commission, 5-10 minutes in length, performer and actor/dancer collaboration, 5-10 minutes in length, subject in CIRMMT research study, etc.) with program notes as relevant. The Department must approve the project the semester before the project is to be completed.   

Students should complete a one-page proposal (section 3 of the Recital Application Form [pdf]) indicating the collaborators involved, the specific role of each of the collaborators, the specific objectives of the project and the means or methods by which the project will be completed (e.g., performance, presentation, publication, etc.) For example, in the case of a composer-performer or performer-dancer collaboration, the project proposal should detail the specific parameters of the composition or interpretative process and the way(s) in which the participants will collaborate (i.e., exploring particular techniques through which different extended techniques will be notated, developing particular gestures through which the musical language will evolve, the relationship between a performer's gestures and the bodily gestures of a dancer, the choreographic implications of a dramatic scene, etc.). In the case of a research study, the proposal should detail the goals and objectives of the study and the particular tasks that will be completed by the performer, and the importance of those tasks to the study as a whole.   

All participants are required to indicate their participation by signing the proposal. The projects must be supervised by an appropriate faculty member and the performance teacher, as relevant to the project. Projects involving a composer and/or a researcher will be approved by both Departmental committees. In the event that the project unfolds as a performance, evaluation will follow the recital guidelines with the panel consisting of the teacher and two other members selected from the list of examiners. One of the latter may be substituted with an expert from another field as relevant to the specific proposal (e.g., composer, theatre, etc.). When the project is a research study, the final grade will be assigned in the same manner as a special project (fifty percent by the performance teacher, fifty percent by the research supervisor).

 

Interdisciplinary Project 2, MUPG 607

 Students complete a research-creation project involving collaboration between different disciplines resulting in a new work, interpretation or contribution to knowledge presented in public (i.e., performer-composer commission, 10-20 minutes in length, performer and actor/dancer collaboration, 10-20 minutes in length, subject in CIRMMT research study, etc..) with program notes as relevant.  The Department must approve the project the semester before the project is to be completed.   

Students should complete a one-page proposal (section 3 of Recital Application Form ) indicating the collaborators involved, the specific role of each of the collaborators, the specific objectives of the project and the means or methods by which the project will be completed (e.g., performance, presentation, publication, etc.)  For example, in the case of a composer-performer or performer-dancer collaboration, the project proposal should detail the specific parameters of the composition or interpretative process and the way(s) in which the participants will collaborate (i.e., exploring particular techniques through which different extended techniques will be notated, developing particular gestures through which the musical language will evolve, the relationship between a performer's gestures and the bodily gestures of a dancer, the choreographic implications of a dramatic scene, etc.). In the case of a research study, the proposal should detail the goals and objectives of the study and the particular tasks that will be completed by the performer, and the importance of those tasks to the study as a whole.   

All participants are required to indicate their participation by signing the proposal. The projects must be supervised by an appropriate faculty member and the performance teacher, as relevant to the project.  Projects involving a composer and/or a researcher will be approved by both Departmental committees.  In the event that the project unfolds as a performance, evaluation will follow the recital guidelines, with the panel consisting of the teacher and two other members selected from the list of examiners.  One of the latter may be substituted with an expert from another field as relevant to the specific proposal (e.g., composer, theatre, etc.). When the project is a research study, the final grade will be assigned in the same manner as a special project (fifty percent by the performance teacher, fifty percent by the research supervisor).

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Guidelines for Vocal Pedagogy Workshop

The candidate is required to present his or her two voice students in a public mini-recital to discuss their progress and to trace the pedagogical focus and choices that have been made during their two semesters of study. Supposed to be 90 minutes in length.

General Procedures:

-student books a date and submits a proposal much like M.Mus. Recital Application Form detailing the specific content, approach, and repertoire for the workshop (see below)
-accepted at performance area committee as per recital
-examination panel consists of teacher and two other members, one of which should usually be from the music education area

General Layout:

- 30 minute talk in which the candidate discusses pedagogical issues arising from teaching the students, drawing on readings and other related research from the field as well as incorporating references to specific students as relevant

- 10 minute intermission

- 20-25 minute presentation of student one

- 6 minute description of student’s entry levels, general goals and approach charted as result of entry presentation, and challenges encountered during the course of the year (students should be encouraged to video-tape or audio-tape periodically and incorporate snippets of the year in their presentations)

- 10 minute performance, two contrasting numbers with the candidate indicating why the numbers were selected as showcases of progress

- 5 minute coaching on one piece in the spirit of, the next thing I would work on in this piece or with this student as a result of this performance would be and I would do this for the following reason (reason is very important so examiners don’t focus so much on what is being worked on, but the process of working on it, and understanding the step in the context of a relationship that has been going on for a year; also important from the sense that students should not feel that have to have so perfect that they become so nervous)

- 20 – 25 minute presentation with student two. Same process, though it would be understood that the candidate would work on something different than the first coaching to the extent that the presentation of the student allowed this (i.e., not working with both students on the expression of the words in the same way).< br/> - 10 minute-Question and Answer Period.

Candidates:

- Should provide the audience with a bibliography of materials relevant to the issues detailed in their lecture

- Should be encouraged to accompany their lecture with power-point or other video- and/or audio- examples in the manner of a professional conference or workshop presentation

Guidelines for Perf in Recording Media, MUPG 659

The candidate must submit a 60-75 minute audio and/or video document of his or her performances on the instrument they were accepted to at McGill. The recording must include only original compositions and arrangements. For students in the Jazz Improvisation or Jazz Orchestra option, the recording must demonstrate originality and competence as jazz instrumentalists. For those in Jazz Composition, the recording must demonstrate originality and competence in composing for large and small jazz ensembles

Deadline dates:

December 1 for students expecting to graduate in February (This is a conferral of degrees only, there is no convocation ceremony.  Students will be invited to the Spring convocation).

April 1 for students expecting to graduate in the Spring.

August 1 for students expecting to graduate in the Fall.

If these dates are on a weekend, the previous Friday will be the deadline date.

Number of copies:  4

Details:  

The CDs/DVDs must be of a professional quality and be labeled accordingly (title of each piece, length and musicians’ names).

Evaluation process:

 The examining panel for all Graduate recitals consists of three members, one of whom is the student’s teacher, except in the event that the student has two teachers: in this instance, the panel will consist of four members. The other panel members are selected from the list of examiners for the student’s area (i.e., horn from the horn list, voice from the voice list, etc.). In some areas, panels have additional constraints.  The student and teacher must choose four names from the Approved List of Examiners for Graduate Recitals (below) and list them on the examination application form. If the student has a particular reason why he or she does not want a particular examiner on the panel, this should be made known to the Graduate Coordinator when the application is handed in.  Teachers should note that priority in selecting examiners for graduate recitals will be given to salaried staff for budgetary reasons. External examiners are for Doctoral examinations only.  The list of examiners can be found on the Recital Application Form which is on the web at:  http://www.mcgill.ca/music/sites/mcgill.ca.music/files/mmusgdppdmusrecitalapplicationform20122013.pdf.

The final mark for the recording will be an average of the three grades submitted by the three examiners. See the Recital Adjustication Policy: http://www.mcgill.ca/music/sites/mcgill.ca.music/files/recitaladjudicationpolicy_october_2011.pdf.

GUIDELINES FOR PROGRAMME NOTES FOR ALL M.MUS.  and GDPP PERFORMANCE STUDENTS

It is essential that students research the pieces that they are performing, and that they present the results of their research in a professional fashion. For this reason, students (enrolled beginning as of Sept. 2011) will prepare an accompanying set of original program notes for all recital projects as part of the requirements for the M.Mus and GDPP.(Voice students must also provide texts and translations into English and French for all songs on their recitals, see below).

Program notes should be in a succinct, graceful, and engaging prose, and address the following factors for each composition that will be performed:
(a) discussion of the significance of the work in question;
(b) basic facts of composition, composer’s biography, and the work’s reception history;
(c) historical and cultural information that places the work or its performance into a larger context;
(d) important compositional features.

There are many ways to structure a program note and the layout will depend on the individual work.

Some helpful suggestions:

  • Begin with an initial statement or section that captures something of the overall significance of the work in a way that invites your readers to read more.
  • Give information that will pique your readers' interest, including insightful or provocative quotations by the composer or significant critical commentator, polemical statements about the work (e.g., adverse criticism which has not been borne out by posterity) or significant biographical information which could be said to have had a significant impact on the work. 
  • Relate facts about the composer and composition as an interesting narrative. Professional guidelines typically suggest that the discussion should move from when and where into broader issues of how and why.
  • It is often useful to refer to works written at the same time or comparable works either by the composer or another composer.
  • Compositional features should include, as relevant to the specific work, description of the layout of the work and program, significant ideas or movements and analytical observations which will deepen the understanding of the work's expression and performance.
  • When providing analytical information, bear in mind that bar by bar analyses do not always make for interesting reading. Also, readers will unlikely share your knowledge of technical terms.
  • Use wit and metaphor to make your writing engaging.
  • Be concise and to the point. Avoid trite commentaries, irrelevant or superficial observations and unsupported subjective opinions.

Length:

The note for each work should be tied to the length of the work and reflect standards in the professional concert context. In a 60 minute program where all the works are more or less of equal weight, a minimum target would be two paragraphs per piece with a maximum of four pages in length. Notes should be type-written, using 12 point font, and standard margins.

Submission:

Two weeks before the first recital, the student must submit 1 copy of their programme notes to the Graduate Studies Office, Room A726B) or by email to: graduatestudies [dot] music [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Grading:

The programme notes will be evaluated on a Pass/Fail basis. If a student receives more than 1 failing grade, they will be asked to redo the notes.

GUIDELINES FOR SONG TEXTS (VOICE STUDENTS ONLY)

It is important that M. Mus. Vocal Performance graduates who are about to enter the profession be fully capable of creating the written materials that are normally printed in recital programs. For this reason, the Voice Area Committee requires every student presenting a Vocal Recital, as part of the requirements for the M. Mus. Degree, to prepare song texts in the original language with English and French translation. It is intended that this document will be printed and distributed at the recital.

When presenting texts to the public, it is particularly important that the information be completely accurate and and that the document is attractively designed and printed. A good poetic translation of the texts is advised. These can often be found in appropriate reference books available in the Marvin Duchow Library or through inter-library loan, at various sites on the Internet, or in many cases, in the accompanying booklet provided with professional CD's and recordings. The Concerts and Publicity Office will help by designing, printing and distributing the final version to the audience, provided that the material is received in an acceptable format and according to the schedule listed below.

PROCEDURE:

a) In consultation with his or her teacher, the student collects the vocal texts (original language plus French & English), enters all this material in a word processor file and assembles a first draft.
b) Once the draft is written, it is reviewed by the student’s vocal teacher who will edit the texts and suggest changes. The student may be required to rewrite part, or all of the document, if in the teacher’s opinion, it is not adequate. Subsequent drafts may be necessary to ensure that the document meets the requirements for accuracy, correctness and style.
c) Song texts must be photocopy ready in a small font size (suggested size: 9), in French and English. Song texts will not be formatted by the Concerts and Publicity Office, only sent for photocopying as is. Concerts and Publicity will arrange for the vocal texts to be printed and will distribute the document at the recital.
d) In the event that a document is not submitted or submitted late, the grade for the recital will be withheld until the document has been received.

Repertoire examination (Orchestral Training option)

Application for a repertoire examination must be made three months before the student wishes to play the examination. Repertoire lists are available here. Students are required to prepare all the excerpts listed for their instrument, and the panel will select the pieces to be played. The examination lasts approximately one hour. The panel will consist of three members: the Area Chair, the student's teacher, and one other teacher from the Area. The final mark will be an average of the three grades submitted by the three examiners. See Recital Adjudication Policy [pdf]. A repertoire examination may not be cancelled less than a month before the scheduled date except for medical reasons. The repertoire examination may be repeated only once. Students who fail the examination a second time will be asked to withdraw from the program. Students must apply for re-examination. A supplemental examination fee will be charged, payable at the time of application.

Quick Study Guidelines (MUPG 614)

Upon entering the M.Mus. Opera/Voice Performance or the Collaborative Piano program, the candidate should determine, in consultation with his or her academic advisor, the semester of study in which he/she would like to perform a Quick Study. The student is required to confirm his or her intent by completing the Recital Application Form, checking the box for the Quick Study and submitting the form to the Graduate Studies Office at least 3 months in advance. The specific dates for the Quick Study are determined in the Spring for the following academic year but are scheduled in late November and March/early April.  

Three weeks before the scheduled performance date, the candidate(s) will be assigned their repertoire. 

The Vocal/Opera Quick Study will include approximately 20 minutes of music consisting of an appropriate song cycle, group of songs, opera or oratorio role, for which candidates are then required to memorize, coach and prepare. A committee comprised of the Chair of the Vocal Area, the Director of Opera Studies, the candidate's Voice Teacher (or another member of the Vocal Area if the Teacher is also Area Chair) and their Vocal Repertoire Coach will determine the repertoire to be assigned. 

The Collaborative Piano Quick Study will include approximately 20 minutes of music consisting of an appropriate song cycle, group of songs, opera or oratorio role, and instrumental work(s), which candidates are then required to help coach and prepare. A committee comprised of the candidate's Teacher (or another member of the Piano Area if the Teacher is also Area Chair) and the Collaborative Piano Coordinator (or delegate if he is the teacher) will usually determine the repertoire to be assigned.

A panel of three committee members will be chosen from the list of approved adjudicators:

For the Vocal/Opera Quick Study, the panel must include the candidate's Voice Teacher, the Vocal Repertoire Coach, and one other representative from the Vocal Area or one other member chosen from the list of approved examiners for Voice.

For the Collaborative Piano Quick Study, the panel must include the candidate's piano teacher, the Collaborative Piano Coordinator or delegate, and another member from the approved list of examiners for voice, string, wind, brass, or percussion as appropriate to the students’ specific repertoire.

The final mark will be an average of the three grades submitted by the three examiners (see Recital Adjudication Policy [pdf]). In the event of a failure, the candidate is allowed one year from the date of the performance to repeat the repertoire assignment procedure. A supplemental fee will be charged for the repeat of the Quick Study Examination. In the event of a second failure, a student would be asked to withdraw. 

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GUIDELINES FOR D.MUS. LECTURE RECITAL AND DOCTORAL PAPER

1.             Relationship with Music Research Department Supervisor.  

Students are expected to work closely with a faculty supervisor throughout the process of preparing the lecture recital proposal, the content of the lecture recital and its presentation, and the doctoral paper. Normally the supervisor for the lecture component of the lecture recital and for the doctoral paper is the Music Research Department member of the committee. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the supervisor and to provide drafts of material well in advance of the deadlines to allow the supervisor to make suggestions for revision and the student to incorporate those suggestions. 

2.             Lecture recital proposal.    

This will include the doctoral lecture-recital proposal form (with signatures of the teacher and the music research department supervisor), plus an additional proposal, 3-5 pages long, which must include:

  • a title
  • a discussion of the major issue(s) or topic(s) and methodologies to be discussed in the lecture recital
  • a discussion of the format (balance between the lecture and the performance)
  • a one-page bibliography, including material on the topic and on the methodology (model articles or books could be included) 
  • A copy of the complete concert program. Include: Title, opus number, key, movements, composer and dates, duration of piece, duration of program (Indicate intermission where applicable).  A list of all other performers involved in program, if applicable, should be included (name and instrument).  If the performers are not from McGill, a brief description of  the background or experience of each performer is required. 
  • A list of equipment needed for the lecture recital (projector for power point, etc.) 

3.             Approval process. 

The lecture-recital proposal must be approved by:

  1. The music research department supervisor and the teacher (whose signatures must be on the form), before the candidate submits the form to the Graduate Studies Office. A complete draft should be sent to the research department supervisor at least a month before the last possible submission date. 
  2. The Advisory Committee. 
  3. The Graduate Performance Sub-Committee.
  4. Faculty Council.

The proposal, with the accompanying form, must be submitted to the Music Graduate Studies office at least three months before the recital date (five months before recitals in September and October). There is a $100 fee for late proposals.

4.             The lecture recital.   

The lecture recital normally includes 35 minutes of music and 35 minutes of talking (about 12 double-spaced pages). It is followed by a short question and answer session, beginning with members of the student’s committee, followed by the members of the audience. The format is flexible, depending on the work and the material to be presented, but there should normally be a handout, overheads or power point presentation (as in academic paper presentations). Handouts should be clearly identified with the student’s name, title of the lecture recital, and date of the lecture recital. Musical examples or quotations should be clearly identified with captions indicating source and page or measure numbers. Students are encouraged to attend Graduate Colloquium not only for the value of the lectures, but also to learn about different delivery styles. 

A draft of the lecture recital text, plus presentation materials (handout, overheads, etc.) must be submitted to the advisory committee three weeks in advance of the recital.  It must be approved by the Music Research Department Supervisor two weeks in advance of the recital.  Other members of the committee are also encouraged to convey their suggestions to the student. 

The examination committee for the lecture recital is normally the D.Mus. advisory committee.  The committee will evaluate the performance and provide comments, not only on the performance, but also to aid in the successful completion of the doctoral paper.  

5.             The doctoral paper 

The doctoral paper is normally 25 to 50 pages.  It should be at a professional level of presentation, with clear and accurate written English or French, full academic citation style, and carefully presented musical examples.  The presentation should be suitable for submission to a scholarly journal, and should follow guidelines for the submission of theses on the Graduate Studies Web site: http://www.mcgill.ca/gps/students/thesis/programs/guidelines/preparation/

There is normally no need for a review of literature.  The doctoral paper needs to be approved at the following levels.

a)       the music research supervisor approves a draft for submission to the advisory committee.

b)       This draft should be submitted to the Music Graduate Studies Office for distribution to the  advisory committee no more than two months after the lecture recital.  They can pass it as is or request revisions. 

c)     after revisions, and with the approval of the music research supervisor, the final copy will be submitted to the Music Graduate Studies Office. This final copy should be submitted no more than three months after the lecture recital.   

6.             Components of the paper: 

                The paper should include:

1.     a title page (the title of the thesis; the name of the author and department followed by “McGill University, Montreal”; the month and year the paper was submitted; the following statement “A paper submitted to McGill University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of D.Mus. Performance Studies”; the universal copyright notice followed by the author’s name and the year the paper was submitted);

                2.   a detailed table of contents;

                3.   a brief abstract in both English and French;

                4.   an introduction that clearly states the rationale and objectives of the research;

                5.   a final conclusion and summary;

                6.   a bibliography or reference list. 

7.     Binding and Labeling:  The final copy must be single-sides and bound in a two-hole, stiff-cover binder (preferably Acco-Press).  Ring or spring binders will not be accepted.  The final copy must have a typed label with the candidate’s name, the complete thesis title, unit and degree sought. 

7.             Deadlines.

 Since the doctoral paper is normally the final component of the degree, the various stages in the approval process and the final date for completion of work for graduation needs to be taken into account in the scheduling of the lecture recital.  The committee needs at least two weeks in which to read the paper before the deadline for submission in order to assign the final mark.

For students who plan to graduate in the spring, the final mark must be submitted by the end of April. The lecture recital, therefore, should be scheduled for a date three months in advance of this date (before the last week of January).  For students who plan to graduate in February, the final mark must be submitted by mid-January.  The lecture recital, therefore, should be scheduled for a date three months in advance of this date (before mid-October).  For students who want to graduate in the fall, the final grade must be submitted by the end of August.  The recital therefore should be scheduled before the middle of May.  Availability of the supervisor and the advisory committee over the summer months should be taken into consideration if the doctoral paper is to be completed and revised over the summer.  

8.             Final Copy. 

The student will submit a final bound copy of the lecture-recital paper to the Music Graduate Studies Office to be kept in the music library by the deadline date for final corrected copies for graduation (see point #7 for deadline dates).

 The final copy must be single-sided and bound in a two-hole, stiff-cover binder (preferably Acco-Press or similar type binder).  Ring or spring binders will not be accepted.  The final copy must have a typed label with the candidate’s name, the complete thesis title, unit and degree sought.  Recordings should be affixed securely to the inside of the front cover and clearly labeled with the same information as on the label. 

Schulich School of Music D.Mus. doctoral papers will be soon submitted electronically to the University.  They will be published in eScholarship@McGill, registered with Library and Archives Canada and added to the full-text commercial database Dissertations and Theses published by Proquest.  Therefore, the final copy must be accompanied by the following three forms which can be filled out and printed on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website: http://www.mcgill.ca/gps/students/thesis/programs/forms/

-Library and Archives Canada Theses Non-Exclusive License
-UMI Form
-McGill Library Waiver Form

Performance tutorials (practical instruction) performance program

The MMus Performance options require 12 credits of performance tutorials (three terms of l hour lessons). Students in the DMus Performance program receive four terms of 1.5 hour lessons or six terms of 1 hour lessons. For full-time students the cost of these lessons is included in the full-time fee. However students are required to pay extra fees if they are not full-time, taking additional terms of lessons or taking elective practical instruction. (See fees and funding for more information.)

The assignment of students to teachers for performance tutorials is the responsibility of the Chair of the Department of Performance. Students' requests for specific teachers are taken into consideration where possible. In general, students will be assigned on a first-priority basis to study with full-time members of the teaching staff. It is understood that returning students will study with the same teacher unless prior arrangements have been made with the Chair of the Department in consultation with the teachers concerned. Teacher assignments will be sent to students at their official McGill email address during the first week of classes. It is then the student's responsibility to contact their teacher to arrange lesson times. The deadline for withdrawing from performance tutorials is the second week of classes in any term.

Performance tutorials missed as a consequence of the instructor's absence will be made up at the mutual convenience of the instructor and student. Lessons missed as a result of the student's absence will be made up only if notice of cancellation has been given 48 hours in advance, or if a doctor's certificate is produced and prior notice of the cancellation is given.

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Vocal repertoire coaching (voice students)

The MMus option in vocal performance requires four credits of Vocal Repertoire Coaching (two terms, 2 credits per term, 1 hour per week, MUIN 600, -601). The MMus option in opera performance requires six credits of Vocal Repertoire Coaching (three terms, 2 crfedits per term, 1 hour per week, MUIN 600, 601 and 602). The DMus in Performance program requires four terms (MUIN 700, -701, -702, -703). However students who are not full-time and those who wish to take additional terms of vocal repertoire coaching are required to pay extra fees. (See fees and funding for more information.)

Ensembles

Students are required to audition for any ensemble courses they register for at the beginning of September, and in some cases, in January. Details concerning the audition schedule may be obtained here . After the auditions, assignments are posted on the Large Ensemble notice board (across from Clara Lichtenstein Hall). Re-assignments or subsequent auditions may be made from time to time during a term and will also be posted. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that they are registered correctly for ensembles, and to make the necessary course changes before the deadline. Students who are not accepted into an ensemble they have registered for must withdraw officially from that course, as students who do not complete a course for which they remain registered are automatically given a failing grade (J or F) for that course. Students who participate in an ensemble but fail to register for it will not be given credit for the course retroactively. The deadline for ensemble course changes is the end of the second week of classes in any term.

In the case of the jazz ensembles, an open challenge system is used as follows:

  1. At any time during a term, a student may challenge for a position in a Jazz Ensemble.
  2. The challenger must speak to the band directors involved, specifying the chair being challenged.
  3. The challenger will have a private audition with not less than two Jazz Ensemble directors who will offer a non-binding recommendation to the student as to whether or not to proceed with the challenge.
  4. Should the challenger wish to proceed, the student being challenged will be notified by the Coordinator of the Jazz Ensembles.

The challenge will take the form of an audition of both the regular member of the ensemble and the challenger in full band rehearsal, followed by a decision from the directors.

Ensemble attendance

Ensembles are courses. Every student who has registered for an ensemble, has been assigned to an ensemble, or is auditing an ensemble, has made a commitment to the ensemble and is required to attend all rehearsals, concerts, performances, field trips, recordings and other activities that constitute the course requirements of that ensemble. Except for reasons of ill health or excused absence granted by the Ensemble Committee (see below), any absence may result in a failing grade for the student.

Situations will arise where students are required to miss classes because of ensemble field trips. Teaching staff in the Schulich School of Music are encouraged to assist students who approach them for information about course content and assignments that have been missed. However, the onus remains on the student who goes on a field trip to complete class work.

Any student who cannot attend a rehearsal or a coaching session for any ensemble is required to fill out an "Ensemble Excuse Form" available on the Schulich School of Music website.  Students are required to submit a completed form at least eight days (8) prior to the rehearsal or coaching session that will be missed, stating the reason for the request with supporting documents. Students who have missed a rehearsal or coaching session due to illness must submit one of these forms within three days (3) of returning to school. In such cases a doctor's certificate or statement from the Student Health Service or equivalent medical institution must be submitted either electronically to the Ensemble Resource Administrator or as a hard copy to the Office of the Ensemble Resource Administrator.

Students may be excused from a rehearsal or coaching session of an ensemble for the following reasons:

  1. Sickness, or emergency medical or dental work. NB: Any student who is experiencing pain while playing or singing should inform their practical teacher and the director of their ensemble(s) and should seek appropriate medical attention. Students should not be reluctant to admit to injury; it is entirely acceptable for students to be excused from ensemble rehearsal(s) for health reasons. The School does not want students to perform with pain or with injury.
  2. An audition for a permanent professional engagement.
  3. A master class.
  4. A major competition.
  5. A professional engagement deemed to be very important for a student's developing career.
  6. Family emergency or an especially important family occasion.
  7. A conflict between an irregularly scheduled ensemble rehearsal or coaching session and a previous important commitment made by the student (proof required).
  8. A field trip for another ensemble or class.
  9. An authorized McGill function.
  10. A religious holiday.

For Nos. 2,3,4 and 5, the request must be accompanied by authorization from the student's practical teacher and the appropriate Area Chair. This permission is given for no more than three (3) rehearsals or coaching sessions.  Note:  NO PERMISSION IS GIVEN TO BE EXCUSED FROM ANY REHEARSAL IN THE CONCERT WEEK, INCLUDING DRESS REHEARSALS, OR FROM A CONCERT EXCEPT FOR NO. 1 AND NO. 2 ABOVE.  IN THE CASE OF OPERA MCGILL, NO ONE CAN BE EXCUSED FROM REHERSALS DURING THE THREE (3) WEEKS PRECEDING THE OPENING NIGHT PERFORMANCE. 

Students are not excused from ensemble rehearsals or coaching sessions for either of the following reasons:

  • Gigs.
  • Non-emergency medical or dental appointments. Students should request appointment times that do not conflict with rehearsals or coaching sessions.

Absences or Delays (especially but no limited to lateness) without an approved Ensemble Excuse Form will result in mark deduction as follows:

  • Absences due to illness (with medical certificate) = no loss of grade.
  • Delays to rehearsal = loss of one grade point (eg; B to B-)
  • Absences without approval = loss of one full grade (eg; A to B)

Ensemble preparation and discipline

If the director of an ensemble is not satisfied with the student's quality of preparation for the ensemble, the Director shall first warn the student. This warning shall be communicated by the Director to the Ensemble Committee who will inform the student in writing. If, in the Director's opinion, this lack of preparation continues, the student will be required to perform the music for a committee consisting of the Director of the ensemble, the Chair of the Area, and the Performance Department Chair. If this committee decides that there has been a lack of sufficient preparation, the student will be required to appear before the Ensemble Committee to show cause why he or she should not be required to withdraw.

The Director may cancel any particular performance, if, after a written warning to the student(s) at least two weeks prior to the performance, with a copy to the Ensemble Committee, the Director, in consultation with his/her coaches, feels that the performance of a student or group of students will not meet a certain minimum standard established by the Director.

The Director of an ensemble may recommend that a student withdraw from an ensemble for disciplinary reasons. A student asked to do so will be required to appear before the Ensemble Committee to show cause why he or she should not be required to withdraw.

Students who are required to withdraw from an ensemble because of lack of preparation or for disciplinary reasons will be given a mark of "F" which will be reflected in their Grade Point Average (GPA).  The failure policy will apply (see section 6.14 of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office General Information, Regulations and Research Guidelines).

Loans from performance music library for ensembles

Students are responsible for the music that has been loaned to them for their use, and for its return in good condition to the Performance Music Library. Students will be required to pay for the replacement of any music that has been lost, stolen or damaged, and for rental materials not returned on time.